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Shelby American and Superformance to Debut Special edition Cobra at BJ


SGT1171

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Superformance makes great cars, but isn't the body shell fiberglass making it a great replica, not an "exact replica". Or is that just mincing terminology?

 

I do like the look of these and they come with the limited edition B&M watch. I expect a good number of these Cobras will show back up individually at auctions in the near future.

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I was watching this but no clue what they were talking about. I find it odd because you have the Superformance Cobra's aka MKII and SAI building the continuation Cobra's and aren't they sort of competeing for the same buyer which is why I was like huh?

 

Always wanted a Cobra but not spending that kind of money on one so I thought one day I will do a Factory Five version as its cheap and you can beat the hell out of it until I discovered how wrong the Factory Five body is. I am now considering the Superformance one because of build quality its that simple.

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OK, here's some conclusions I garnered from a similar discussion in the other forum.

 

The 15 cars were pre-sold. Because they came with power trains installed they cannot be registered in most jurisdictions in the US. (Those power trains cannot be claimed under the new rules since they are not emissions compliant in 2016.)

 

Superformance is however selling a roller version of the fiberglass version. These would be treated just as any other component roller - get it registered according to the rules in your state just like any other Superformance or Shelby CSX.

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I was watching this but no clue what they were talking about. I find it odd because you have the Superformance Cobra's aka MKII and SAI building the continuation Cobra's and aren't they sort of competeing for the same buyer which is why I was like huh?

 

Always wanted a Cobra but not spending that kind of money on one so I thought one day I will do a Factory Five version as its cheap and you can beat the hell out of it until I discovered how wrong the Factory Five body is. I am now considering the Superformance one because of build quality its that simple.

 

Here is a general rule of thumb for Cobras

 

Factory Five and Backdraft can be had in kit versions. The cheapest of them are built on donor components (Mustang II front ends, Jaguar rear ends). They look like a Cobra but are cheap.

 

Both FF and BD offer upgrades to suspensions that are closer to the originals. These are inexpensive. Both also offer "roller" versions that do the labor of assembly but that doesn't make them any closer to the originals and they are still cheap entry level machines. Resale value for both isn't all that great. By the time you add the power train (and perhaps pay someone to do it (since it isn't just a drop in - they always require some tweeking) they usually depreciate and except for the most exemplary ones, will take some time to sell.

 

Superformance rollers are close to the originals. You pay more. Quality is very high. Resale value is pretty close to break even after a few years, and SPF cars tend to sell fairly quickly.

 

Shelby CSX rollers are as close as technology allows to the originals (even SAI agrees there are some concessions to newer technology, e.g., brakes). Yes, they are manufactured by Hi-Tech in South Africa (the same company that also manufactures Superformance) but they are NOT the same car. They are the most expensive (although a fully loaded SPF can approach a CSX price - SPF charges for some things that are included with the Shelby). Shelbys also tend to APPRECIATE.

 

I discourage first time Cobra owners from buying a new one and dealing with power train. Kits go unfinished and sold before being done at a rate of about 60-75%. Rollers are mostly finished by shops that know what they are doing, and a power train installed can run you over 30K. Staying with the small block engine will help keep hard costs down and are much easier to maintain than the FEs.

 

Before running out and buying one, please talk to folks that own one, ride in one (most won't let you drive it). Passengers tend to hate Cobras (they are uncomfortable to sit in for any long period of time) while drivers love them because of the thrill of driving it and surviving (My Cobra hissed at me "I'm going to kill you" every time I got in it.

 

They are also the 4 wheel equivalent of a Harley - you'd never knowingly drive one into a thunderstorm, so they are fair weather cars.

 

I'll also leave aluminum cars out of the discussion. Your choices there are Shelby and Kirkham, but the cost is quite high and I would never recommend an alloy car for a first time Cobra owner especially if they haven't ever had the experience of owning a fragile open 2-seat car.. (The aluminum is easily dented in some cases having been bowed by someone leaning on the car at a car show, and don't even think about the consequences of hail.)

 

P.S. All that said, I will probably own another Cobra when the GT is gone.

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Here is a general rule of thumb for Cobras

 

Factory Five and Backdraft can be had in kit versions. The cheapest of them are built on donor components (Mustang II front ends, Jaguar rear ends). They look like a Cobra but are cheap.

 

Both FF and BD offer upgrades to suspensions that are closer to the originals. These are inexpensive. Both also offer "roller" versions that do the labor of assembly but that doesn't make them any closer to the originals and they are still cheap entry level machines. Resale value for both isn't all that great. By the time you add the power train (and perhaps pay someone to do it (since it isn't just a drop in - they always require some tweeking) they usually depreciate and except for the most exemplary ones, will take some time to sell.

 

Superformance rollers are close to the originals. You pay more. Quality is very high. Resale value is pretty close to break even after a few years, and SPF cars tend to sell fairly quickly.

 

Shelby CSX rollers are as close as technology allows to the originals (even SAI agrees there are some concessions to newer technology, e.g., brakes). Yes, they are manufactured by Hi-Tech in South Africa (the same company that also manufactures Superformance) but they are NOT the same car. They are the most expensive (although a fully loaded SPF can approach a CSX price - SPF charges for some things that are included with the Shelby). Shelbys also tend to APPRECIATE.

 

I discourage first time Cobra owners from buying a new one and dealing with power train. Kits go unfinished and sold before being done at a rate of about 60-75%. Rollers are mostly finished by shops that know what they are doing, and a power train installed can run you over 30K. Staying with the small block engine will help keep hard costs down and are much easier to maintain than the FEs.

 

Before running out and buying one, please talk to folks that own one, ride in one (most won't let you drive it). Passengers tend to hate Cobras (they are uncomfortable to sit in for any long period of time) while drivers love them because of the thrill of driving it and surviving (My Cobra hissed at me "I'm going to kill you" every time I got in it.

 

They are also the 4 wheel equivalent of a Harley - you'd never knowingly drive one into a thunderstorm, so they are fair weather cars.

 

I'll also leave aluminum cars out of the discussion. Your choices there are Shelby and Kirkham, but the cost is quite high and I would never recommend an alloy car for a first time Cobra owner especially if they haven't ever had the experience of owning a fragile open 2-seat car.. (The aluminum is easily dented in some cases having been bowed by someone leaning on the car at a car show, and don't even think about the consequences of hail.)

 

P.S. All that said, I will probably own another Cobra when the GT is gone.

Wow...... So you are saying my $71,000 Backdraft Cobra is cheap. Here is what I'll offer into the conversation:

 

Having owned two Cobra's and driven many of them, I purposely chose the Backdraft car because of the more reliable and predictable setup. As you stated, most Cobra's will try to kill you and my first Cobra was no exception. I've driven Superformance cars as well and they also will try to kill you. Then I drove the Backdraft car and the BMW suspension/brakes made all the difference. 427R engine with 553 HP and I can pour on the throttle just about anytime I want to going through corners, launching hard, etc. Anytime I would merely breathe on the throttle in the other Cobras, the back end wanted to break lose and pirouette. That is not what I call fun... that is just stupid and get's really old very quickly. If you want a Cobra that is as close to an original without paying the price tag, a Kirkham or Superformance is clearly the choice. With that said, most enthusiasts want a car they can ENJOY for a long period of time. I would put my Backdraft car up against either of these high dollar replicas on a road course or twisty mountain roads at speed any day. Good luck keeping up with me.

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