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2007 Shelby GT under 3 feet of water. : (


StratGirl
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My Shelby GT has just become the latest victim of Hurricane Sandy. The tide rose too fast to get her out. Can I get some advice? I'd like to rebuild her. Any recommendations of shops in the NY area that could handle the job? I assume I should NOT try to start her at all tomorrow? Kind of overwhelmed here.

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Sorry to hear that. I hope you are safe though. I would be sick if it were me. If your Insurance company totals her out, there are alot of nice low mileage ones out there looking for a new home. Good luck with everything.

Edited by IASHELBYGT
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Man what a bummer, sorry to here about this. I think I would let the insurance company total out and find another one. Your going to have all kinds of gremlins, salt water damage, and mildew. There are just to many good Shelby's out on the market to not get one without water damage. Electronics are going to be a big problem also. It would sure make me sick.

 

GG

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Take care of your self and familiy. The car will most likley be totaled and as others stated, salt water will create more issues for you. As stated, find another low milage car once things simer down. There are alot out there.

 

Again, take care and I will keep you and others facing Sandy in my thoughts.

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My Shelby GT has just become the latest victim of Hurricane Sandy. The tide rose too fast to get her out. Can I get some advice? I'd like to rebuild her. Any recommendations of shops in the NY area that could handle the job? I assume I should NOT try to start her at all tomorrow? Kind of overwhelmed here.

 

 

Talk to Dan Carlson at Realspeed in Bohemia.

He might not be able to take the job, but he's one of the few honest shops on Long Island... he'll help you get sorted.

 

 

Jer

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Growing up on the Gulf Coast and being poor we learned at an early age how to help salvage cars when the storms would drown them. First a couple of questions did it just get fresh water (storm Run-off) or salt water, how long was it under, no matter which the insurance company is probably going to total it. First and foremost do not let anyone try to turn it over, if the engine is tight and does not get turned over you may get lucky and not kill it. If you get to keep it as soon as possible drain all fluids and replace it and all grease, as you drain you can add something similar to Marvel mystery oil or others to help pull all moisture, this will take a few fills and flushes no matter what it will take a lot of work but someone will salvage it or part it out if the insurance company totals it, so why not let it be you.

 

 

Good Luck, I hope you can bring it back to life, sorry for the loss.

Charles

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StratGirl,

 

The most important thing is that you and yours are safe from Sandy. No amount of money or insurance can fix people getting hurt. Your Shelby can be replaced. If you're properly insured, work with your carrier to decide if it's a total. If so, go out and find another. There are many well kept examples looking for a good home. And lastly, I hope your Strat was untouched... because music is the best therapy for a situation like this. Stay safe and dry!

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My condolences regarding your plight.

 

Terrible news about your car. If it were me, I would consider getting a different one.

 

None of us in your situation want to hear something like that but 3 feet of salt water is a bit much for me.

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Sorry also but may have the same problem. We just bought a GT 500 in Old Bridge N.J. and have not been able to get through to the dealer this morning. We were getting it shipped to Vegas to make an anniversery car . Maybe someone in that area can tell me how bad it is in Old Bridge.

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Sorry to hear about your Shelby. As many have said, glad you are okay and it will all work out for you.

 

If the insurance company totals your car, please be sure to contact Steve with your CSM # along with the VIN# to update the registry.

 

We'll be thinking of you. Keep us posted.

 

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Wow...what can I say that others haven't! I am sooooooo sorry to hear this.

 

I do have to agree though...while I'm sure you have an emotional attachment to the car there are others, just as deserving, looking for good homes.

 

It's all going to to hinge on your local laws and your insurance company so good luck!

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Your fine it sounds like, which is good.

 

The car, is or should be totaled.

The only way I have seen / found a flooded car successfully restored is a body off type tear down, every electronic sensor, module replaced, every connector and wiring harness replaced, all metal parts washed down, every component disassembled, clean, inspected for damage and reassembled.

Everyone not done this was, and I have seen hundreds, worked on dozens, had issue down the road.. corrosion issues on metal components, inside wiring, and electronic sensors or modules.. And this was with fresh water (creeks and rivers) it would only be worse with salt water.

 

Your safe, that’s the important part… replace the car and move on.

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Found this on another website, for what it's worth.

 

Whatever path you end up taking, my fingers are crossed that it works out for you,

 

(“We can rebuild him. We have the technology. We can make him better than he was. Better...stronger...faster.” )

 

How To Salvage A Flooded Car

 

 

Jason Torchinsky

 

With Sandy being a wet, windy jerk to most of the Northeast, we’ve been seeing lots and lots of pictures of flooded streets, underground parking lots turned into dark auto-aquariums, and generally many, many cars being submerged in way too much water. Water, like its nemesis fire, is a good servant but a cruel master, and there’s little that can be more damaging to a car than a really good soaking. So, if you’re one of the countless numbers of unlucky folks who are now the owners of a 2500 lb coral reef, is there anything you can do? Is there any way to salvage your car after it’s spent any amount of time underwater? And, if so, is it worth it?

The odds aren’t great for recovering a drowned car, but it certainly can be done. We’ll walk through the widely-agreed upon steps to try and help salvage your dampened ride.

This assumes it’s worth it to you, in most cases your insurance agent will just pay to scrap it.

 

Don’t turn anything on!

When you finally find your car after the floodwaters have receded, you may very well be tempted to put the key in and see what happens. Don’t. Every part of the car has been soaking in water, and there’s water in pretty much every place water shouldn’t be. If you even put the key in that could start electricity flowing through water-logged connections and wires, and since water conducts, that means shorts and major electrical damage. If you have power locks, don’t use them— try and do everything manually. Hopefully, your battery was ruined first and no current was flowing through the car. If at all possible, get the hood (or trunk, or lift the back seat, etc) open and get to the battery, and disconnect the ground strap first thing. While its wet, we want no electrons moving through any of the car.

 

Figure out how bad it is

If you don’t think the car was entirely submerged, you’ll want to figure out just how much it was, so look for a high water line. If it’s roughly below the dashboard area, you probably got lucky, as it’s likely your car’s electronics were spared.

 

Drain everything you can drain

Your car has many parallel fluid systems— oil, fuel, hydraulic fluid, transmission fluid, and even water, and chances are really good unwanted water is in all these systems. Check any and all dipsticks for water droplets so you can get an idea how bad things are. If you see droplets of water on the dipstick, it’s bad. So, drain the fuel system (you may need or want to remove the gas tank to drain), drain all the oil from the crankcase—if possible, it’s not a bad idea to remove the oil pan and let any water drip out — same goes for the transmission, if you’re able. If you can replace the brake fluid (and hydraulic clutch fluid, if applicable) do it. Change out spark plugs, air, fuel, and oil filters, anything that may have gotten water in it.

For all this, I’m assuming and hoping the car was off when flooded— a running car submerged is a different story, as electrical systems will short and the engine may actually take water into the cylinders, which can cause a great deal of damage. Let’s hope that’s not your car.

 

Let the electronics dry as best you can. Maybe try some rice.

This is by far the trickiest part. Almost every remotely modern car is controlled by a number of cooperating computer units, and these computers communicate via low voltage signals and data streams and have tiny connectors that are sensitive to corrosion, or may trap little pockets of moisture that could cause shorts and possibly fry your expensive ECUs. There’s a number of ways to do this, but one way I haven’t yet heard mentioned but I feel may be worth trying is the rice method. I’ve known people to place submerged iPhones in bags of rice for a few days, and the rice does a remarkably good job of absorbing the moisture from the phone. I think a similar system could work for your car’s electronics, if you can find where things are and can get rice nearby. This is a big if.

If you can remove ECUs or dash units or even radio head units, it may be worth packing those components in a Tupperware-type plastic box with a bunch of rice, and leaving it for a few days. It certainly can’t hurt. The more water you can draw out of these units the better.

 

The stink. Oh god, the stink.

Chances are your car wasn’t flooded with the purest mountain spring water or rosewater or Scope; it’s much more likely it was disgusting, muddy, partially sewer-tainted yuck-juice. All the soft, porous bits in your car have absorbed all this grossness, and there’s not a hell of a lot you can do. You can let it dry, and help the process with hair dryers or similar, but it’s very likely the seat fabric, stuffing, and carpet will retain some sort of olfactory record of the disgusting. Harder, nonporous plastics will fare better.

Try cleaning with conventional methods anything you can. It may not do much for residual smells, but it can’t hurt. Maybe cultivate an interest in other smelly things you can use to mask the scent— now could be the time for that dashboard herb garden, or possibly the center-console artisan cheese display case you’ve been considering.

The only solution here may be to rip everything soft out— carpet seats, etc, and replace them with new or used materials, or go racecar style and try a carpet-less car for a while. You may find you like it!

 

Drive it!

If you get this far, and have drained and replaced everything, dried your electronics, it’s time to give it a try. With any luck, your car has been resurrected from the screaming moist, and now you and your mechanical pal need to celebrate with a drive. Getting things running and moving should help flush out any remaining water from the system. Expect rough driving and losses of power as water works its way out of fuel lines and the engine in general. But don’t give up— heat, lubricating oil, and the action of the engine will all help your car to recover. Run the heater and a/c, and get ready for some disgusting water to spray out of the vents, and likely some rich, complex odors as well. Drive with the windows down.

Don’t give up. You’re dampened, but unbowed. And think of the great story you’ll have to tell about your car!

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I just got through to n.j. to the salesman we bought the GT 500 from and said our car is OK. They have no electricity and has no idea when they will get power. Trees are down, power lines are down and it is quite a mess. He and family are OK. So just have to wait to get our Shelby shipped to Vegas. Stratgirl I hope your car can be fixed, if not, like others have said you may find one to replace it. Make it bigger,badder and faster and of course beautiful. Good luck.

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No chance I would try to fix it, that was SALT Water that flooded it, there is a reason people will not touch flooded cars.

 

Sorry about your car, hope you and your family are safe, get the Insurance Company to total it, that will be the best decision you could ever make.

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