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Installed Bmr Lca Relocation Brackets


Cdvision
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With help from my bud Marcus we installed the BMR LCA relocation brackets on my GT500. The passenger side took about and hour to install and required a little more cursing.The drivers side only took about 15 mins. It literally slid right into place with everything lining up perfect. The LCA's now point slightly up towards the front of the car instead of down like before. The top position worked out perfect. Gotta wait for the rain to stop so I can road test it.

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20150124_132233_zps0dyjrjoh.jpg
Edited by Cdvision
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Thanks Grabber...on both counts. Ya pretty wet up here!! How about you guys?

Its been a soaker the last 8 days. Sun came out all day today. The next 2 days are dry. I am going hiking tomorrow with my wife and another couple up at Lucia Falls.

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Correcting the LCA angle after lowering the car. LCA's should be level or angle slightly up towards the front of the car. Lowering will typically see the angle pointing down towards the front of the car causing a reduction of rear tire traction under acceleration.

Edited by Cdvision
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Got to try a launch during todays road test. Felt pretty good. Pulled fairly hard..slight spin rolling on the throttle in 1st and 2nd. Feels more planted coming out of a corner too.

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Correcting the LCA angle after lowering the car. LCA's should be level or angle slightly up towards the front of the car. Lowering will typically see the angle pointing down towards the front of the car causing a reduction of rear tire traction under acceleration.

 

^^^^Yes, correcting the I.C. (instant center) is important on a lowered car, this can only be accomplished by relocating the LCA's back to a similar angle that they were before the car was lowered. The replacement of LCA's and UCA will help to eliminate wheel hop, but excessive spin (and better traction) can only be acheived by correcting the I.C.

 

 

 

 

R

Edited by Robert M
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Really helped on mine. It digs in and hooks up now. Fabulous mod and for so little money and easy to do. Before the car sort of felt like it was sitting up high and nervous on launch (don't know if I explained that well?)

 

Now it just digs in at the back like an old Mopar...!

 

Malc

 

15204616178_267d8ced22.jpgLCABracket1 by malc350, on Flickr

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  • 3 weeks later...

^^^^Yes, correcting the I.C. (instant center) is important on a lowered car, this can only be accomplished by relocating the LCA's back to a similar angle that they were before the car was lowered. The replacement of LCA's and UCA will help to eliminate wheel hop, but excessive spin (and better traction) can only be acheived by correcting the I.C.

 

 

 

 

R

Would a stock height gt500 benefit from changing out the lca's and relo brackets, would there be much to gain in the launch/traction department? I don't see much if any axel hop on my 2012 svtpp, Also what exactly is instant center?

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Would a stock height gt500 benefit from changing out the lca's and relo brackets, would there be much to gain in the launch/traction department? I don't see much if any axel hop on my 2012 svtpp, Also what exactly is instant center?

 

IC can probably be explained more thoroughly through a Google search, but basically it is where the angle of the LCA's meet at the center line of the drivetrain. The further forward this meet point (intersection) the worse the traction. If the car is lowered and the front of the LCA's are low, the intersection is way out in front of the car. In drag racing (for traction purposes), most cars attempt to get this meet point of the two lines somewhere in the drivers seat area as a general starting point. <<This angle set up starts the axle and rear suspension in a motion that aids traction quicker, rather than first overcoming the fact that the LCA's are low in the front when the weight transfer happens.

 

As for lowering the LCA's on a stock/oem ride height car? Don't know how much that would help with all of the rubber attachment points?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

R

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for what its worth, i never changed the upper or lower control arms (both pieces are OEM) and i eliminated all of my wheel hop.

 

i did tires, relocation brackets, shocks, springs. sway bars and pan-hard bar, which were all added or replaced with aftermarket upgrades.

Edited by 2007red40thGT500
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for what its worth, i never changed the upper or lower control arms (both pieces are OEM) and i eliminated all of my wheel hop.

 

i did tires, relocation brackets, shocks, springs. sway bars and pan-hard bar, which were all added or replaced with aftermarket upgrades.

 

 

^^^This is also good to know. There is a definite "plus" to keeping the oem LCA and UCA rubber attachment points when a smooth/oem comfort ride is desired.

 

 

 

 

R

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agreed. my upgrades all had poly bushings too... not rod ends, which would be a more extreme performance option.

 

 

Not to mention that the rod ends also require lubrication attention that is different from traditional mounting types, especially when exposed to normal use in all types of weather.

 

 

R

Edited by Robert M
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IC can probably be explained more thoroughly through a Google search, but basically it is where the angle of the LCA's meet at the center line of the drivetrain. The further forward this meet point (intersection) the worse the traction. If the car is lowered and the front of the LCA's are low, the intersection is way out in front of the car. In drag racing (for traction purposes), most cars attempt to get this meet point of the two lines somewhere in the drivers seat area as a general starting point. <<This angle set up starts the axle and rear suspension in a motion that aids traction quicker, rather than first overcoming the fact that the LCA's are low in the front when the weight transfer happens.

 

As for lowering the LCA's on a stock/oem ride height car? Don't know how much that would help with all of the rubber attachment points?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

R

 

^^^^^^I want to mention something about my post above, I said the IC is the intersection point of the straight line of the LCA's and the straight line of the drivetrain..................I may be wrong about the drivetrain line, it may be the imaginary UCA straight line and the imaginary LCA straight line where they meet? Either way it is the intersection of the two imaginary straight lines that are where the IC is calculated. I have not looked this up on Google to verify, but I'm sure there is information out there that is much more in depth and thorough than my simple explanation.

 

 

 

R

Edited by Robert M
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