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What IS Middle Class?


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What IS Middle Class? When the Government talks about Middle Class, that mention Incomes of $150,000.00 to $350,000.00 a Year. This Article says $40,000.00 to about $80,000.00..............

 

 

http://finance.yahoo.com/career-work/article/112950/middle-class-jobs-danger-marketwatch

Edited by tesgt350
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Yeah, it would be nice to know what cubby hole I fall into just for the heck of it. And, to have a a true picture, we would have to know the cost of living in our area. Otherwise, "x" amount of money could represent one thing with a "y" cost of living and another thing with a "z" cost of living. I live in southern California so cost of living is a significant factor.

 

Jim

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Well based on the numbers you posted, and yahoo states, I can report that I'm in the middle class!!! :happy feet:

 

 

 

:headscratch: Thinking like a true Politition :hysterical:

Edited by tesgt350
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Depends on where you live I think.

 

 

True...

But I'd have to believe than even here in the NY/NJ metro area. 150k to 350k isn't middle class. My recollection is that anyone making over 150k is in the top 10% of earners in the US. So something isn't right. I think Yahoo is closer to reality.

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The definition of "middle class" is whatever the politician, at a particular moment in time, spins you into believing depending upon the subject matter at hand necessary to generate campaign funds and/or votes, afterwhich, at a later time, generally following their election, you will be deemed wealthy and your taxes will be raised anyway.

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The definition of "middle class" is whatever the politician, at a particular moment in time, spins you into believing depending upon the subject matter at hand necessary to generate campaign funds and/or votes, afterwhich, at a later time, generally following their election, you will be deemed wealthy and your taxes will be raised anyway.

 

 

+1000

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Middle class is the class that pays the taxes that the rich don't and support the people that cannot support themselves.

 

 

 

Hmmmmmmm........ What about those that PAY TAXES and can BARELY support themselves?.....................................

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Hmmmmmmm........ What about those that PAY TAXES and can BARELY support themselves?.....................................

 

 

Most of them try to live beyond their means from what I've observed.

 

50%+ of Americans pay no taxes at all!

 

We should all pay the same percentage, no matter what. I vote for 25%, that would give me a nice bonus!!

 

Unfortunately, I live in CT, where we are taxed to DEATH. I'm paying way beyond my fair share IMHO, so surely many are benefiting from me!

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Most of them try to live beyond their means from what I've observed.

 

50%+ of Americans pay no taxes at all!

 

We should all pay the same percentage, no matter what. I vote for 25%, that would give me a nice bonus!!

 

Unfortunately, I live in CT, where we are taxed to DEATH. I'm paying way beyond my fair share IMHO, so surely many are benefiting from me!

 

 

 

25% has my vote...................... I would love the pay raise happy%20feet.gif

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This is a very subjective issue.

 

In my county, for example, I'm probably upper middle class.

 

When I lived in Fairfield County in CT - I was probably upper lower class! :hysterical:

 

So if what you're saying is true I'm doing the best of anyone....

 

First class is better than second class, so no class beats them all.... :happy feet:

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I for one was under the impression that there is no more middle class? I think Ron Paul has said that??? Or someone like him.

 

If there is no more middle class, then that leaves the advertised 1% of the UPPER class. Which means also then, that the remainder of us minions are in the lower class. And.....yes, I speak for myself in this!! To which that number then is 99%. So that all said, next time I'm on a flight to Phoenix for instance, (David this doesn't include you..Hahaha), should I bow to the people,( the 1% in the front of the plane in rows 1 through like 4), or curtsey or something??? Maybe kiss their feet as I lumber by with my old used up Nikes and my OP shorts from 1985!!! :hysterical:

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I for one was under the impression that there is no more middle class? I think Ron Paul has said that??? Or someone like him.

 

If there is no more middle class, then that leaves the advertised 1% of the UPPER class. Which means also then, that the remainder of us minions are in the lower class. And.....yes, I speak for myself in this!! To which that number then is 99%. So that all said, next time I'm on a flight to Phoenix for instance, (David this doesn't include you..Hahaha), should I bow to the people,( the 1% in the front of the plane in rows 1 through like 4), or curtsey or something??? Maybe kiss their feet as I lumber by with my old used up Nikes and my OP shorts from 1985!!! :hysterical:

 

 

Well, for there to not be a Middle Class, they sure do seem to like talking as if there is a huge number of people in that Class..........

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There is no standard definition, and in fact, an overwhelming majority of Americans say they are "middle class" or "upper-middle class" or "working class" in public opinion polls. Hardly anybody considers themselves "lower class" or "upper class" in America.

 

It’s possible to come up with a definition of what constitutes "middle income," but it will depend on how large a slice of the middle one prefers. If we look at U.S. Census Bureau statistics, which divide household income into quintiles, we could say that the "middle" quintile, or 20 percent, might be the "middle" class. In 2006, the average income for households in that middle group was $48,561 and the upper limit was $60,224. But we could just as reasonably use another Census figure, median family income. In 2006, the median – or "middle" – income for a family of four was $70,354. Half of all four-person families made more; half made less.

 

Journalist Chris Baker examined the ambiguous meaning of the term "middle class" in a 2003 Washington Times story. He, too, found no generally accepted definition, but he did get this broad one from Jared Bernstein, an economist at the liberal Economic Policy Institute: "There are working families who can pay their bills, but they have to really think about such minimal expenditures as picking up a pizza after work, going to the movies, making a long-distance telephone call. They may have some investments, but they depend on each paycheck for their well-being."

 

But others could have different definitions. Baker interviewed a man who earned about $100,000 a year and a woman who made $35,000, both of whom said they were middle class.

 

Public opinion polls show how slippery the term can be.

 

An Oct. 2007 poll by the Kaiser Family Foundation, Harvard School of Public Health and National Public Radio asked 1,527 adults what income level makes a family of four middle class. About 60 percent said a family earning $50,000 or $60,000 fit that description. But 42 percent answered an income of $40,000 and 48 percent said $80,000 were both middle class. Other polls suggest that 90 percent or more of Americans consider themselves to be "middle class" or "upper-middle class" or "working class." An April 2007 poll by CBS News found that of 994 adults surveyed only 2 percent said they were "upper class," and 7 percent said they were "lower class." In another poll, taken by Gallup/USA Today in May 2006, 1 percent said they were "upper class," and 6 percent said they were "lower class." Interestingly, since 12.3 percent of Americans were living below the official federal poverty level in 2006, these poll findings suggest many who are officially poor still consider themselves to be "middle class" or "working class."

 

So what do politicians mean when they say "the middle class"? Good question.

 

Each politician may be talking about a different group of Americans, but the message many voters hear is that the politician is talking about them.

 

For example, Democratic presidential candidate John Edwards called for "tax breaks to honor and strengthen three pillars of America’s middle class: savings, work, and families." One of his proposals is to expand a tax credit to give dollar-for-dollar matches on savings up to $500 a year. Some version of that credit would be available to families earning up to $75,000.

 

Republican candidate Mitt Romney, meanwhile, later proposed eliminating "taxes on dividends, capital gains, and interest on middle class families." He defined "middle class" as anyone with an adjusted gross income of under $200,000 – and acknowledged that such a proposal would affect "over 95 percent of American families."

 

http://factcheck.org/2008/01/defining-the-middle-class/

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