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clutch and flywheel problems


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Anyone with a 2008 KR had any issues with warped flywheel and clutch failure as I just read about on the 2007-09 GT500's? There is a whole string of posts about faulty flywheels in '07-09 GT500s. I wonder with the low miles we KR owners tend to have if we are going to be in trouble. There was mention of a certain build date for the car that after that, the problems were less likely? I am concered that by the time I recognize a problem it will be too late for a remedy. Sounds like some have gotten their dealers to get work done under warranty.

Also, How do you determine what your build date is?

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The dealer you bought your car off of should be able to get the DORA which would give you the build date. If you check back in the post there is a way you can tell if you got the up graded flywheel & input spline shaft.. I think the date the new flywheel was installed was Oct/08 not sure.

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  • 1 month later...

SMART MOVE Kia on the 2009 Model!! DOH!! I had NO clue! I also have NO idea of my build date; I'll call my Dealer; he was a great guy to work with and one of our Members here turned me onto both him AND my KR that I bought. ( Mike Mangold of MANGOLD FORD in Central Illinois) Funny, after my Maiden drive after picking it up I was complaining to him about my clutch; it literally was "HISSING" loudly whenever you'd engage it...NO miles on it yet or anything but WTH?? We laughed it off as being maybe a "Deliberate HISSING Noise to replicate a hissing Cobra" BUT i really DON'T think they could've/would've ever even thought of that or done it intentionally! God I HATE having to take any car into the Dealer for ANY kind of work; or warrantly work especially! BUT guess I'd better look into the TSB(s) and figure out what the deal is! : > THANKS for posting your experiences about this on here!

 

If I'm not mistaken, I think any KR's built after 8/26/08 are good to go. One of the reasons I opt'd for a 2009 model year only during my search.

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...after my Maiden drive after picking it up I was complaining to him about my clutch; it literally was "HISSING" loudly whenever you'd engage it...NO miles on it yet or anything but WTH??..

 

They all hiss, the '07-'09 GT500s. I thought it was odd too, and mine's an '09. It's the nature of our twin-disc clutches. Haven't had any trouble with mine, so far..but I've only got around 4K miles on it. Still has some hiss in it, but the hiss seems quieter than it was when new.

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I have the 2008 kr. I have tried 3x to get the dealership that I bought the KR from to change the clutch under the tsb. They won't do it until the clutch starts displaying a specific laundry list of problems. There are about 5 of them. One for example, is that the car has to creep forward, car in first gear, clutch fully depressed. It's not disengaging completely because the flywheel is warped.

 

Bottom line in my experience so far, the dealership isn't going to replace the clutch until the flywheel is actually warped.

 

I have heard of others succesfully getting the clutch replaced before the flywheel warps. So I encourage you to try. They might do it! I've had no luck though with three attempts to date. It seems like it might change dealer to dealer.

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Here's what happened to me with my 2008 GT-500.

 

I purchased a 2008 GT-500 in late '07. Put about 2300 miles on it before I had total clutch failure. Now, I have a theory and it's just that, a theory.

 

The root problem with the entire clutch/flywheel problem is a "warped" flywheel. The fault happens when the flywheel either begins to warp, or warps past a point where you get total failure (such as what happened to me)

Now, here is my theory. I took my car out on an extremely cold November day to get oil. My buddy came to my house with his '70 Olds and he wanted me to take the GT-500 out so we could race around a bit as we went to the auto parts store. It was very cold outside and very windy. We got to the auto store and my buddy does a nice burnout in the parking lot. Not wanting to get out done by his Olds, I also lay down some rubber during a nice burnout myself. Well, I put the car in gear, shut it down, and head into the store.

When I came out, I put the car in neutral, started it, and that was it. I could NOT get the car into ANY gear. My theory is....I must have gotten that clutch and flywheel nice and hot during the burnout. After shutting the car down, the cold temps plus the wind must have cooled the flywheel too fast causing it to really warp, which in turn caused total failure.

 

This happened with only 2300 miles on the car.

 

Reason most KR owners are not having trouble is (again, a theory) that most do not drive them in the cold, most don't do burnouts with them, and the mileage is low as well.

My advice...start doing burnouts in the winter time !!......lol

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It sounds like a very viable theory...extreme heat and rapid cooling are the recipie for shaping metals...I wonder if we plotted the complete failures on a map if we'd find higher failure rates in the Northern US over the south? Either way, your point about KR owners is probably right.

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Rapid cooling of heated metal......never a good thing. On the transport category aircraft I fly, sometimes for various reasons the brakes will get smoking hot. Many reasons for this, some due to poor pilot technique, others due to conditions/weight. Landing a 630,000 pound airplane in the heat/humidity of summer in Hong Kong at the old Kai Tek airport was bound to create warm brakes. In this situation, maintenance will hook up fan shrouds to the wheels hubs. Cools them quicker, but not too fast. They wouldn't use a water hose, for example, unless a fire was imminent. We have had guys get the brakes so hot they have melted the axles. Serious heat costing millions of dollars in damage. And these brakes, the 747 for example, each wheel hub having brakes (the nosewheel doesn't have brakes), each have 8 disk assemblies. So 16 wheels combined have 128 disks working to bring the whale to a stop. I wish I could find a video of the molten metal from a high speed abort from Boeing. Used to have it somewhere.

 

Anyway, same concept be it brakes or clutch. Friction/heat/rapid cooling/warp.

 

Sounds like a good theory to me. My car has 2300 miles on it now. No problems....yet. Here in SoCal we don't get the cold extremes. Might be just the difference that keeps the clutch working.

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