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Fix for rear sway bar squeak


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Here is a fix I used on my rear sway bar to lube the bushings and tone-down that nasty rear sway bar squeak. That squeak was getting to me and from my experience with other urethane sway bar bushings, I knew that it wasn't normal for that much noise.

 

One lubricant I've come to use regularly on the Harleys is anti-seize lubricant, which is used on bolts that you want to get loose again later. I noticed that when I got it on my hands, it was hard to get it off - very sticky stuff. I figured that if I tried some on the bushings, maybe it might cure the dreaded rear end squeak and keep the bushings lubricated longer than regular grease.

 

It's now been over two months since the bushings were lubed, and the sway bar has been squeak-free. There are three bushings on each side of the sway bar. One at the end of each sway bar near the bottom of the shocks, and two bushings on each frame bracket connecting to the sway bar. I lubed all six bushings. Also, there are grease zerts on the bushings located below the shocks. There are holes in the bushings for the grease to reach the inner sway bar if you want to try and grease these two bushings with a grease gun. Frankly, the bushings fit very tight and I doubt a grease gun would do much good, but I did drill out the grease holes in these two bushings, making them larger, in case I try the grease gun someday.

 

To grease the bushings, you need to remove the rear tires to access the bushing bracket under the shocks. Also, the frame brackets are split where they fit around the sway bar and this piece is held in place by two small allen head bolts. The top bolt on both my brackets broke-off when they were being removed and my easy-outs wouldn't work (I probably should have heated it first.) I had to take both brackets to my machine shop to have them removed and the holes threaded again. Be prepared for this little problem.

 

I found out from someone at SAI that these sway bars, when installed, came with a small packet of grease to lube the bushings. From looking at my bushings once removed, I only saw two that had been lubed with any grease! :drool:

post-26281-127845992766_thumb.jpg

post-26281-127845992766_thumb.jpg

Edited by springer
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Here is a fix I used on my rear sway bar to lube the bushings and tone-down that nasty rear sway bar squeak. That squeak was getting to me and from my experience with other urethane sway bar bushings, I knew that it wasn't normal for the much noise.

 

One lubricant I've come to use regularly on the Harleys is anti-seize lubricant, which is used on bolts that you want to get loose again later. I noticed that when I got it on my hands, it was hard to get it off - very sticky stuff. I figured that if I tried some on the bushings, maybe it might cure the dreaded rear end squeak and keep the bushings lubricated longer than regular grease.

 

It's now been over two months since the bushings were lubed, and the sway bar has been squeak-free. There are three bushings on each side of the sway bar. One at the end of each sway bar near the bottom of the shocks, and two bushings on each frame bracket connecting to the sway bar. I lubed all six bushings. Also, there are grease zerts on the bushings located below the shocks. There are holes in the bushings for the grease to reach the inner sway bar if you want to try and grease these two bushings with a grease gun. Frankly, the bushings fit very tight and I doubt a grease gun would do much good, but I did drill out the grease holes in these two bushings, making them larger, in case I try the grease gun someday.

 

To grease the bushings, you need to remove the rear tires to access the bushing bracket under the shocks. Also, the frame brackets are split where they fit around the sway bar and this piece is held in place by two small allen head bolts. The top bolt on both my brackets broke-off when they were being removed and my easy-outs wouldn't work (I probably should have heated it first.) I had to take both brackets to my machine shop to have them removed and the holes threaded again. Be prepared for this little problem.

 

I found out from someone at SAI that these sway bars, when installed, came with a small packet of grease for the bushings. From looking at my bushings once removed, I only saw two that had been lubed with any grease! :drool:

 

 

Nice write up , I had that problem but it disappeared but good info thanks

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Here is a fix I used on my rear sway bar to lube the bushings and tone-down that nasty rear sway bar squeak. That squeak was getting to me and from my experience with other urethane sway bar bushings, I knew that it wasn't normal for the much noise.

 

One lubricant I've come to use regularly on the Harleys is anti-seize lubricant, which is used on bolts that you want to get loose again later. I noticed that when I got it on my hands, it was hard to get it off - very sticky stuff. I figured that if I tried some on the bushings, maybe it might cure the dreaded rear end squeak and keep the bushings lubricated longer than regular grease.

 

It's now been over two months since the bushings were lubed, and the sway bar has been squeak-free. There are three bushings on each side of the sway bar. One at the end of each sway bar near the bottom of the shocks, and two bushings on each frame bracket connecting to the sway bar. I lubed all six bushings. Also, there are grease zerts on the bushings located below the shocks. There are holes in the bushings for the grease to reach the inner sway bar if you want to try and grease these two bushings with a grease gun. Frankly, the bushings fit very tight and I doubt a grease gun would do much good, but I did drill out the grease holes in these two bushings, making them larger, in case I try the grease gun someday.

 

To grease the bushings, you need to remove the rear tires to access the bushing bracket under the shocks. Also, the frame brackets are split where they fit around the sway bar and this piece is held in place by two small allen head bolts. The top bolt on both my brackets broke-off when they were being removed and my easy-outs wouldn't work (I probably should have heated it first.) I had to take both brackets to my machine shop to have them removed and the holes threaded again. Be prepared for this little problem.

 

I found out from someone at SAI that these sway bars, when installed, came with a small packet of grease for the bushings. From looking at my bushings once removed, I only saw two that had been lubed with any grease! drool.gif

 

 

Hey Springer,

 

My SGT has an intermittent case of this. I plan on asking the Ford dealer to check this out when I go in for my next oil change, somedays it is worse than others depending on the weather.

 

GG

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GG, good luck with the dealer. Hopefully he hasn't read the Shelby GT owner's manual - which tells us to "get use to the squeaking sway bars."

 

 

Hey Springer,

 

Yea the owners manual states squeaks are normal on a SGT racing suspension, I don't buy it though. Will see how it does after a lube.

 

GG

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Nice write up. Good thinking with the anti-seize. I've had to literally throw piles of work clothes away after bathing in the stuff for days on any given project. It ought to stick to those bushings for quite a long time.

 

My solution was to simply delete the rear sway bar after installing the Griggs setup. I don't have any sway bar squeaks, but those heim joints make up for it. confused.gif

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Ken, I'll keep you updated. That anti-seize is some of the nastiest stuff I've ever handled too.

 

I was also looking at Harley Davidson springer front end grease which is also very hard to wash off. My tube was about empty so I went with the anti-seize. Harley's very proud of their springer grease - you'll know what I mean if you ever have to purchase a tube.

Edited by springer
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  • 6 months later...

It has got really cold here and mine have really got worse. I tired WD40 during the summer and got some relief but it has come back with the really low temps.

 

I don't like it and have said many times I don't buy the squeak stuff in the owners manual. Have not been to the dealer yet.

 

GG

Edited by TAPD117
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It has got really cold here and mine have really got worse. I tired WD40 during the summer and got some relief but it has come back with the really low temps.

 

I don't like it and have said many times I don't buy the squeak stuff in the owners manual. Have not been to the dealer yet.

 

GG

 

 

I doubt the dealer will touch it when he sees they're urethane sway bar bushings. They squeak! There are grease zerts on the bushings, so you can try that also. If you go with the grease zerts, try some Harley springer front-end grease. It's very sticky and will not wash out as easy as regular grease. Or, you can go grab some of that anti-seize and try that, it worked for me.

 

Be prepared for some stubborn bolts in the brackets. I'd use some penetrating spray on them the day before you tackle it! I had two of the bolts snap, one from each center link bracket. I had to take them to a machine shop to have them removed.

 

Good luck! That squeak can be some very annoying sheeetttt! :drool:

Edited by springer
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Thanks for the helpful info. I have actually applied some silicone spray lube to the smaller bushings which was surprisingly effective and of course easy to do, but probably not for as long as grease or anti-seize lube. Curious, what is the bar running at an angle under the rear axel? Haven't seen it before, and my coupe does not have it. Is this an extra body brace for 'verts?

 

Here is a fix I used on my rear sway bar to lube the bushings and tone-down that nasty rear sway bar squeak. That squeak was getting to me and from my experience with other urethane sway bar bushings, I knew that it wasn't normal for that much noise.

 

One lubricant I've come to use regularly on the Harleys is anti-seize lubricant, which is used on bolts that you want to get loose again later. I noticed that when I got it on my hands, it was hard to get it off - very sticky stuff. I figured that if I tried some on the bushings, maybe it might cure the dreaded rear end squeak and keep the bushings lubricated longer than regular grease.

 

It's now been over two months since the bushings were lubed, and the sway bar has been squeak-free. There are three bushings on each side of the sway bar. One at the end of each sway bar near the bottom of the shocks, and two bushings on each frame bracket connecting to the sway bar. I lubed all six bushings. Also, there are grease zerts on the bushings located below the shocks. There are holes in the bushings for the grease to reach the inner sway bar if you want to try and grease these two bushings with a grease gun. Frankly, the bushings fit very tight and I doubt a grease gun would do much good, but I did drill out the grease holes in these two bushings, making them larger, in case I try the grease gun someday.

 

To grease the bushings, you need to remove the rear tires to access the bushing bracket under the shocks. Also, the frame brackets are split where they fit around the sway bar and this piece is held in place by two small allen head bolts. The top bolt on both my brackets broke-off when they were being removed and my easy-outs wouldn't work (I probably should have heated it first.) I had to take both brackets to my machine shop to have them removed and the holes threaded again. Be prepared for this little problem.

 

I found out from someone at SAI that these sway bars, when installed, came with a small packet of grease to lube the bushings. From looking at my bushings once removed, I only saw two that had been lubed with any grease! :drool:

 

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i hardly get any squeeks in the warmer season. in winter time it squeeks. as far as anti-seize. i use 409 to get it off my skin and tools. but get it on ur clothes, as some of u have said, ur up poop creek. lol<BR><BR>edited for grammar errors lol<BR><BR>wtf?

Edited by fatboy
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Thanks for the helpful info. I have actually applied some silicone spray lube to the smaller bushings which was surprisingly effective and of course easy to do, but probably not for as long as grease or anti-seize lube. Curious, what is the bar running at an angle under the rear axel? Haven't seen it before, and my coupe does not have it. Is this an extra body brace for 'verts?

 

 

Mustang Dan, the extra bars are chassis stiffening supports probably found only on the convertibles. There are usually extra support braces found on most convertibles, and since I don't have a coupe to compare it to, my guess is that you are correct.

 

Here is another pic of the underside.post-26281-0-13732100-1295195803_thumb.jpg

post-26281-0-13732100-1295195803_thumb.jpg

Edited by springer
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Interesting. Wonder if it would be at all worthwhile to add these stiffeners to the coupe (reduction of squeaks, improvement in handling, etc.)? I had a Buick Grand National some years ago, and it was popular to add similar stiffeners in several spots. Aftermarket kits were (and I think still are) available for the Buick.

 

Mustang Dan, the extra bars are chassis stiffening supports probably found only on the convertibles. There are usually extra support braces found on most convertibles, and since I don't have a coupe to compare it to, my guess is that you are correct.

 

Here is another pic of the underside.post-26281-0-13732100-1295195803_thumb.jpg

 

 

 

 

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Dan, I don't know how much the bars would help the coupes. When they installed my Whipple supercharger they removed the strut tower brace from the engine compartment and frankly I can't tell any difference. The strut tower brace wasn't very effective anyway. Besides the strut towers, it needed to be tied into the firewall to really be effective. It really is a show piece, but it doesn't show much as it covers-up parts of the engine. :finger:

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  • 1 month later...

The weather has changed and its in the upper 70s in Texarkana, AR this week. I've had the top down all week and guess what. The winter squeak in the rear has all but disappeared, imagine that??????

 

Mine is always worse when it gets really cold. Not one squeak yesterday or today. Just thought I would pass this on. I wonder if it is possible or has anyone replaced the nylon bushing in the racing suspension.

 

:headscratch: GG

Edited by TAPD117
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I drove the Shelby down to the Autorama in Dallas today and it has now been nine months since I lubed the sway bar bushings with anti-seize. The rear end of the car is still squeak-free and the anti-seize seems to be holding its own.

Edited by springer
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  • 2 months later...
  • 3 weeks later...

Here is a link that I started that directs people to a great silicone grease that is to be used on sway bars with polyurthane bushings.

 

http://www.teamshelby.com/forums/index.php?/topic/67899-silicon-grease/

 

I just ordered a tube so I will see how well it works

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Here is a link that I started that directs people to a great silicone grease that is to be used on sway bars with polyurthane bushings.

 

http://www.teamshelby.com/forums/index.php?/topic/67899-silicon-grease/

 

I just ordered a tube so I will see how well it works

 

 

Thanks Scotty, I read that thread yesterday and Ford's recommendations made me chuckle. They used silicone grease originally, and they squeaked like hell. Anti-seize will not rot your bushings, that I know for sure. And mine are still squeak-free."

Edited by springer
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