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2010/2011 clutch question


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I recently had he 2010 kit installed on my 07 and all is good for the most part, but was curious if it is normal that when starting on a hill the clutch pedal feels a bit different (not as smooth and positive feeling as say from a flat surface start)

 

Obviously you are going to need more gas when starting on a hill but this is a difference in the feeling of the pedal.

 

Also, everyone now and then I still can get a slight chatter, slight and seldom but curious if anyone else does.

 

I recently ordered the stainless steel clutch line by FRPP because I am wondering if the high heat in the bellhousing causes the clutch fluid line to balloon and affect the clutch feeling. Also if the clutch line does not change shape at all, it should give you a slightly longer pedal travel and be consistent every single time?

 

 

thx

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My clutch has the same feel on a hill or flat ground.

No chatter whatsoever.

Interesting comment about the clutch line, but I think Ford would test that so it doesn't occur.

 

Just like anything else, if you look hard enough you will find imperfections. We all tend to microanalyze when we've had problems with a particular part. I think your clutch is fine.

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If I baby it I get a little chatter sometimes off the line. All high performance clutches that I've had chatter a little if you don't give it enough throttle from a stop.

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If I baby it I get a little chatter sometimes off the line. All high performance clutches that I've had chatter a little if you don't give it enough throttle from a stop.

 

 

How do you guys release this 2010 clutch, from a stop and a hill?

 

Curious because I do not want to over heat mine or over slip it?

 

I try and use as little throttle as possible therefore releasing the clutch slower when say in traffic?

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How do you guys release this 2010 clutch, from a stop and a hill?

 

Curious because I do not want to over heat mine or over slip it?

 

I try and use as little throttle as possible therefore releasing the clutch slower when say in traffic?

 

on a hill, if its pretty steep and your uncomfortible giving it full throttle and gardually letting the clucth out--you coould Granny it, ie pull the brake on, let the clutch up and as you start feeling the car engage,release the brake.But really, sounds like your focusing on this too much.Just give it throttle and let the clutch up and itll be fine--just dont let the clutch slip too much,let it fully engage and go.Are you sure youre in first gear--maybe with your newness with a manual, youre trying to start out in 3rd--now that'll burn up a clutch real quick

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Chuck, try this link and see if it helps: http://en.wikipedia..../Clutch_control or here it is, kinda long but it's worth the few minute read. Make sure to click "Riding the Clutch" it has good info. also along with some of the other links.

 

 

Clutch control

 

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Jump to: navigation, search Clutch control refers to the act of controlling the speed of a vehicle with a manual transmission by partially engaging the clutch plate, using the clutch pedal instead of (or in conjunction with) the accelerator pedal.

 

Overview

With the clutch pedal completely pressed or a motorcycles clutch lever pulled entirely towards you, there is no direct link between the engine and the driveshaft, so no power can pass from the engine to the driveshaft and wheels. With the pedal entirely released, there is full contact between the engine and the driveshaft, via the clutch plate, which means that the engine can apply power directly to the driveshaft. However, it is possible to have the clutch plate partially engaged, allowing the clutch to slip. As a result, only a fraction of the power from the engine reaches the driveshaft.

 

Benefits

There are benefits to the use of clutch control in specific circumstances:

 

Low gear and low speed

When a car is in first gear, small variations in engine speed translate to large changes in acceleration and engine braking. However, with a combination of clutch control and careful use of engine speed, a much smoother ride can be achieved - by allowing the clutch to slip, variations in engine revs are not immediately translated into changes in drive shaft rotation speed, but rather the friction on the clutch plate allows the drive shaft to gradually equalize with the speed of the engine.

 

Once the car reaches a suitable speed, the clutch can be fully engaged and speed can then be controlled either by varying the engine speed or by partially disengaging the clutch again if necessary.

 

This particular use of clutch control is frequently taught to learner drivers as a way to control acceleration when pulling away from a complete stop or when driving at very slow speeds while minimizing the chance of stalling the engine.

 

Uphill start

For mechanical aids to hill-starting see Hill-holder and Hill Start Assist When pulling away on an uphill slope the chance of stalling the engine is greater, and as a result it can be beneficial to engage the clutch more slowly than normal while revving higher than normal.

 

Adverse road conditions

In adverse road conditions, notably snow or ice, it is recommended to pull away in as high a gear as possible to minimize torque on the wheels and thereby maintain traction with the road. Pulling away requires progressively slower engagement of the clutch as the gear increases, and in a high gear it is necessary to engage the clutch slowly to avoid the increased risk of stalling the engine, or, in the case of adverse weather conditions, spinning the wheels.

 

Changing from first to second gear under maximum power

As the clutch slips, engine speed is lost but torque is not lost except through the effect of the new engine speed on the engine torque itself. In most car engines the torque output is higher as the engine speed increases up to 4500RPM or more [1]. So slipping the clutch actually gives more torque to the wheels even though the fraction of power wasted in the clutch increases much faster.

 

It is not necessary to maintain high engine speed to properly operate a motor vehicle. Any vehicle with a standard transmission can operate with an engine speed slightly above idle when following the proper gear sequence. The clutch can be operated normally with no sacrifice in performance; however, in certain off-road and racing conditions, to attain higher speed and better performance, the practice of clutch control plays an integral part in doing so.

 

Balancing the clutch

Normally when a vehicle is stationary on an uphill slope it is necessary to use the handbrake in conjunction with clutch control to prevent the vehicle from rolling backwards when pulling away. However, in situations where the vehicle must be stopped briefly, for example in slow moving traffic, the clutch can be used to balance the uphill force from the engine with the downhill force of gravity. The benefit of this is that there is no need for the hand- or foot-brake, and the driver can pull away more quickly. Doing this technique will wear out your clutch faster.

 

Deceleration

Typically with motorcycles and in motor sport, the clutch is often used to facilitate the use of resistance from the engine spinning at high speeds to decelerate the vehicle more quickly, often accompanied with normal braking. This is achieved by placing the vehicle in a gear that would ordinarily be too low for the current speed and momentum of the vehicle and by partly engaging the clutch. When this happens momentum energy from the inertia of the vehicle is taken away to spin the engine as close as possible to its maximum capability. As the vehicle is decelerating the clutch can be further released to transfer more energy to keep the engine spinning as quickly as possible. Once the clutch is entirely released this cycle proceeds downwards through the gears to further assist deceleration. If the clutch is controlled improperly while this is being attempted, damage or extra wear to the engine and gears is possible, as well as the risk of wheels locking up and a subsequent loss of proper vehicle control.

 

See also: Engine braking

 

Problems

Even normal use of clutch control increases the wear (and decreases the lifespan) of the clutch. Excessive use of clutch control or riding the clutch will cause further damage.

 

Prolonged use

While the use of clutch control at low speed can be used to obtain greater control of acceleration and engine braking, once a car has picked up sufficient speed the clutch should be fully engaged (pedal released).

 

Excessive engine revolutions

Excessively revving the engine while using clutch control, or keeping the clutch partially engaged while accelerating with the gas pedal, can cause unnecessary damage to the clutch.

 

Slipping the clutch (sometimes referred to as feathering the clutch) is a term used by automotive enthusiasts to describe when the driver alternately applies and releases the clutch to achieve some movement of the car. It's called slipping because the clutch plate will slip against the flywheel surface when such an action is performed. Slipping the clutch is known to be hard on the clutch surface due to the sliding friction created.

 

Drivers can frequently be observed slipping the clutch when they are trying to stay stationary on a hill without using neutral and the brake. They apply the clutch to climb a bit, then release to roll back, then apply again, etc. so that the car stays in about the same place. The alternative to this technique of staying stationary on a hill would be to put the vehicle in neutral and apply the brake.

 

Slipping the clutch is a popular term in drag racing culture and is done when launching a car, usually in a drag race. Some contend that slipping the clutch is the best way to launch a front-wheel drive (FWD) car as it prevents Torque steering that many FWD cars experience when too much power is put to the front wheels.

 

Riding the clutch

In a vehicle with a manual transmission, riding the clutch refers to the practice of needlessly keeping the clutch partially disengaged. This results in the clutch being unable to fully engage with the flywheel and so causes premature wear on the disc and flywheel.

 

A common example of riding the clutch is to keep slight continual pressure on the clutch pedal whilst driving, as when a driver habitually rests his/her foot on the clutch pedal instead of on the floorboard or dead pedal. Although this slight pressure is not enough to allow the clutch disc itself to slip, it is enough to keep the release bearing against the release springs. This causes the bearing to remain spinning, which leads to premature bearing failure.

 

When shifting properly the driver "shifts" to another gear and then releases pressure on the clutch pedal to re-engage the engine to the driveshaft. If the pedal is released quickly, a definite lurch can be felt as the engine and driveshaft re-engage and their speeds equalize. However, if the clutch is released slowly the clutch disc will "slip" against the flywheel; this friction permits the engine a smoother transition to its new rotation speed. Such routine slippage causes wear on the clutch analogous to the wear-and-tear on a brake pad when stopping. Some amount of wear is unavoidable, but with better clutching/shifting technique it can be minimized.

 

Riding the clutch occurs when the driver doesn't fully release the clutch pedal. This results in the clutch disc slipping against the flywheel and some engine power not being transferred to the drive train and wheels. Most drivers routinely use this inefficiency effectively when driving in reverse (inasmuch as fully engaging the reverse gear results in velocity too great for the short distance traveled) or in stop-and-go traffic (inasmuch as it is then easier to control the throttle and acceleration at very slow speeds).

 

Riding the clutch should not be confused with 'freewheeling' or 'coasting' where the clutch is pressed down fully allowing the car to roll either downhill or from inertia. While this isn't damaging to the car, it can be considered a dangerous way to drive since one forgoes the ability to quickly accelerate if needed. It is, however, common practice to roll into a parking space or over speed bumps via momentum.

 

See also

 

Sources

 

Retrieved from "http://en.wikipedia..../Clutch_control"

Edited by jsarkis
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good read, thanks.

 

I am not clutch crazy lol (meguiars told me car crazy though haha), the reason I may seem that is because my dealer tried to claim the driver was the reason for needing all these tsbs but I assure you after reading that, I do not do any of the "no" no's" so that is reassuring. This is just the first car Ive driven that needs throttle to get it going from a roll, normally you can just slowly but assertively and your on your way. Previous stangs for slow starts you just release the clutch pedal and go.

 

Bottom line though, you have to slip the clutch. Some people try and say you cant because it heats the flywheel and warps it. I assure you it would impossible to never slip the clutch (that goes for both street use and at the track) I say the track as well because if you don't slip the clutch off the line, you will spin your tires and same goes for on the street!

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good read, thanks.

 

I am not clutch crazy lol (meguiars told me car crazy though haha), the reason I may seem that is because my dealer tried to claim the driver was the reason for needing all these tsbs but I assure you after reading that, I do not do any of the "no" no's" so that is reassuring. This is just the first car Ive driven that needs throttle to get it going from a roll, normally you can just slowly but assertively and your on your way. Previous stangs for slow starts you just release the clutch pedal and go.

 

Bottom line though, you have to slip the clutch. Some people try and say you cant because it heats the flywheel and warps it. I assure you it would impossible to never slip the clutch (that goes for both street use and at the track) I say the track as well because if you don't slip the clutch off the line, you will spin your tires and same goes for on the street!

 

 

hey Chuck,

 

'llI give you my input. I have to slip the clutch when pulling into my garage. The driveway is steep and I can't just let it release for fear of going through the back wall :) With that being said I don't really notice any difference from a normal release/driving. Not sure if that helps but thought I would let you know.

 

DaFreak

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I have some GREAT reading that I have found on the net and from my experiences with replacing everything related to this clutch system several times

 

But I am holding off until I can get a certain part I just received today installed....

 

 

 

Full write up in the comming weeks

 

Keep in mind, that I have had at least 5 (lost count) clutch systems in my car and all with the same issues along with many others, and there is an explanation for all of it

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I have a "Late" 2010 Convertible.

 

My 2010 has never once chattered under any driving technique that I have noticed.

 

When I was looking, I test drove a 2008 that chattered ocasionally at traffic lights in the 5 miles or so that I drove it.

 

I thought it was abused or something, but apparently it is normal for that year?

 

Hope this helps...

Edited by gt320
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