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Why Aaron Shelby signature on GT-40 Diecast?


07SGT5687

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My car week got cut short but I am sure Aaron was at the 50th reunion during car week in Monterey (Pebble Beach) representing the Shelby family. http://www.motor1.com/news/94583/meet-the-ford-gt40s-of-the-2016-pebble-beach-concours-delegance/

 

Very appropriate IMO.

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Ok. I mean no disrespect to the Shelby Family... I worshiped the ground Carroll walked on... But... I just don't see the connection here. I mean I respect that he's the son and that he represents the family, but there is a big difference between that and signing a car he personally had no direct connection to... especially right next to Bob Bondurant's signature - a living legend.

 

Again, all due respect, I think this looks a bit misleading. Yes, Carroll is gone... that's what makes the signatures of his that are out there even more special and valuable. I just don't see what the value and/or significance will be years down the road for a signature of Carroll Shelby's son. I mean are people lining up to buy football signed by Michael Jordan's son? Brett Farve's son? Or for racing's sake... Jimmie Johnson's son? Or passed racing's sake... Buddy Baker's son? Ayrton Senna's son? (btw, I have no idea if any of those people have son's, but you get my point).

 

I appreciate all I'm sure Mr. Aaron Shelby does to further the company, legacy and foundation... I just don't see his being a relevant commemorative signature, let alone next to one as legendary as Bob Bondurant.

 

Here ends my rant... crucify away...

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Well, to share a real and better example, Dale Earnhardt Jr. has been the most popular NASCAR driver for years and years. There's a reason for this and it's not due to Jr's driving.

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Dale Earnhardt Jr. has competed for championships most of his Sprint Cup career, 26 wins, a prolific restrictor plate race winner - just like his father - and an Xfinity Series Champion. He's made the NASCAR equivalent of the playoffs 8 of 12 years (including 2 years sidelined with injuries)... pretty good run by most sports teams standards.

 

Has Aaron Shelby competed in any form of motorsports?

 

IMO, not a "better example".

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O7SGT is correct. Looks like a Kardashian ploy for notoriety by Licensing. Aaron is a nice guy but has no racing or factory shop history other than grandpa's last name. It is worthwhile that he is on the board but he is not the one that established the name notoriety. The Shelby achievements are of a family member two generations before him. Dale Jr. is an active and long time participant in NASCAR, not a family spokesperson.

 

Carroll and Bob earned their stripes that are related to the collector items. It should rest there with the signatures. IMO

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If I am not mistaken this is a diecast representative of the actual #2 car that won the 1966 Lemans. The #2 car was piloted by Bruce McLaren/Chris Amon and entered by Shelby American. This car is also sometimes called “the car that shouldn’t have won Lemans” because of the controversy surrounding the request made by Ford Executives near the end of the race to get a “photo op” of a 1-2-3 Finish of the GT40's. The Shelby American car #1 piloted by Ken Miles/Denny Hulme in the leading GT40 actually was intentionally slowed down by Miles at the very end of the race, and due to a “distance covered” rule, the win was credited to the McLaren/Amos car. As a result, Miles /Hulme were relegated to second place.

 

Mclaren died in 1970 and Amos died recently in August 2016, Ken Miles died a couple of months after the 1966 Lemans while testing the “J” car, and Hulme died in 1992 of a heart attack while driving a BMW during the Bathurst 1000, so obviously none of these individuals could sign these die cast cars. On top of that, there really aren’t that many people Shelby related people left that were involved with the GT40 of that era. Bondurant was instrumental in the development of the GT40 during prototype testing and he was also one of the first to race the GT40’s, so yes it is fitting that his signing would be perceived as adding to the value of this GT40 diecast. As most TS members already know, Aaron Shelby is the grandson of Carroll Shelby. Over the past couple of years he has actively represented the Shelby Brand at Media events and he is now a director at Shelby. I don’t know Aaron personally, but locally in Dallas he is well known, good things are written about him locally and he does a lot for the Dallas/Plano community. He is a successful individual in his own right, and an avid car enthusiast. Even before he joined Shelby he did a lot for “the brand” because The Annual Legacy Bank Car show he has organized for the past 6 or 7 years is one of the best Shelby Events in the USA. I think it is great that a Shelby family member has joined in to help insure that Carroll Shelby’s Legacy thrives. Sure, a few individuals may question the value of his signature, but there were obviously ten people who saw value in this dual signature car because this die cast sold out in a matter of minutes…..and they probably could have sold many more. I for one think it is great that both Bob and Aaron took time out of their busy schedules to sign some of these die casts and made them available for the collector community. Hopefully, much of the extra money these die cast brought in went to the Carroll Shelby Foundation to help kids in need. I also don’t think there was anything misleading, it clearly states signed by Bob Bondurant and Aaron Shelby. Kudos to both gentlemen for making an effort to support the brand and hopefully the Foundation. If you didn’t think the car had value as signed then you simply didn’t have to buy it. Congrats to the individuals who were able to get one while available.

 

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Thanks mhr1961 for bringing the most important fact to the discussion, supporting the Foundation that Carroll Shelby cherished. Bob Bondurant is the signature of a legend and the one signature that most likely matters for those buying these die casts. I think his signature could be on a VW die cast and people would purchase it. That may even be a "one off signature", lol. That said, nothing misleading just an added signature who by the way is of the grandson of Carroll Shelby. No harm, no fowl. Now this "Kardashian ploy for notoriety by Licensing" that makes no sense and may be a bit extreme.

 

I think anyone who knows the CS history also knows who Aaron is and would not get confused or mislead. That said, let's agree to disagree!

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First off Aaron is Carroll's Grandson. Having met Aaron and having done business with the Legacy Bank which leads I can attest the man is a terrific. You are welcome to your opinion on the value of Aaron's signature, however, this is an item I would be proud to own and display.

 

If it makes you feel any better, Aaron too would wonder why anyone would want his signature unless it was on a check.

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As I was well aware a topic of this nature, in this environment would result, I too will need to agree to disagree. As a reminder, I made no slight against who Aaron was as a person or contributor to the Foundation and the absolutely blessed mission it serves. I do not however think it's too far of a stretch to be confused about the juxtaposition of Aaron Shelby and Bob Bondurant on a 1966 Fors GT-40 MKII diecast.

 

BTW, you all know as well as I do that there are more than 10 people on Team Shelby that will buy whatever they offer, especially when it's "commemorative" and "limited". That, IMO, doe snot legitimize it.

 

That all said, kudos to Aaron Shelby AND BOB BONDURANT for taking part in this valuable contribution to the Carroll Shelby Foundation.. regardless of the previous "conversation".

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Ok. I mean no disrespect to the Shelby Family... I worshiped the ground Carroll walked on... But... I just don't see the connection here. I mean I respect that he's the son and that he represents the family, but there is a big difference between that and signing a car he personally had no direct connection to... especially right next to Bob Bondurant's signature - a living legend.

 

Again, all due respect, I think this looks a bit misleading. Yes, Carroll is gone... that's what makes the signatures of his that are out there even more special and valuable. I just don't see what the value and/or significance will be years down the road for a signature of Carroll Shelby's son. I mean are people lining up to buy football signed by Michael Jordan's son? Brett Farve's son? Or for racing's sake... Jimmie Johnson's son? Or passed racing's sake... Buddy Baker's son? Ayrton Senna's son? (btw, I have no idea if any of those people have son's, but you get my point).

 

I appreciate all I'm sure Mr. Aaron Shelby does to further the company, legacy and foundation... I just don't see his being a relevant commemorative signature, let alone next to one as legendary as Bob Bondurant.

 

Here ends my rant... crucify away...

Bob signed the CAR, Aaron signed the BASE that the Car sits on...............and I am sure that we can all agree that, no matter how good "Intentions" are, someone WILL complain.

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I can't comment without obvious prejudice here. I consider Aaron a friend, and I also recognize his contributions to the company that perhaps are not obvious at this point in time. His involvement has been a key component of the continuation of CSBI and all aspects of the business.

 

It's a valid question though.

 

For those that have that, I have a question-

In your opinion, do you feel that the brand has run its course and that because Carroll is no longer with us, any new product would lack legacy?

 

For racing history it is a valid issue. But I tend to look at this from a business standpoint, and like Ford, Shelby builds a vehicle product. It's a natural progression to see a business pass on to the next generation if they are capable and willing. In that respect, I see no difference between Aaron and Henry III. I think if you had anything Ford on you and had the chance, a Henry III signature would be very desireable, correct?

 

So perhaps neither view is wrong, but isn't it better to offer cool limited stuff than nothing at all?

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Dale Earnhardt Jr. has competed for championships most of his Sprint Cup career, 26 wins, a prolific restrictor plate race winner - just like his father - and an Xfinity Series Champion. He's made the NASCAR equivalent of the playoffs 8 of 12 years (including 2 years sidelined with injuries)... pretty good run by most sports teams standards.

 

Has Aaron Shelby competed in any form of motorsports?

 

IMO, not a "better example".

Much better than you provided. Also I disagree; Jr. is not the most popular driver because of his achievements. It's because he's Earnhardts son and he's in the same business.

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Much better than you provided. Also I disagree; Jr. is not the most popular driver because of his achievements. It's because he's Earnhardts son and he's in the same business.

 

Well, if you say it's better... it must be, I guess. But to say none of Dale Jr.'s many accomplishments do not significantly contribute to his popularity... is ridiculous.

 

And regardless, it's not even in the same realm;

 

1) Grandson of Carroll Shelby, involved in the business and foundation...

 

vs.

 

2) Son of Dale Earnhardt with an accomplished motorsports career of his own...

 

IMO, only one of these would even KIND OF make sense to sign his father's - or grandfather's - commemorative motorsports diecast... and even Dale Jr. signing a #3 car would be a stretch...

 

Listen, I get it. We all respect Aaron and his family/business lineage, contributions to the foundation (I've said it myself to a point of beating a dead horse)... but again, IMO this does not legitimize it as a signature commemorating a historically significant diecast.

 

I almost think it might have been more accurate or correct to have Bob sign the diecast and Aaron sign the certificate of authenticity. Bob was the significant (and still available) commemorative signature and Aaron is the family figurehead that guaranteed it to be accurate and representative of the Shelby family name...

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I would rather see a family photo of Aaron and his legendary grandpa signed by Aaron. If it were a framed piece offered by the wonderful Foundation (which I have supported since it started as the Carroll Shelby Children's Foundation 25 years ago), I would purchase it as a contribution.

 

The Foundation Shop does need more items in their catalog. There used to be cases upon cases of posters, caps, shirts, die casts, medallions, etc. in the warehouse with new items from flashlights and pocket knives to books and a variety of collectables coming out every few months. I know as I have shelves and bins of this stuff. The selection seems more limited now. While I commend the effort to introduce new items, I just do not see the signature relevance. I have met Bob many times, but not Aaron, though, I appreciate that he has joined the Board as a hands on family member.

 

Actually, I would like to hear more updates on the status of Shelby Museum with the hope that the recent auction of CS' vehicles helped get it back on track. But I digress, sorry.

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Well, if you say it's better... it must be, I guess. But to say none of Dale Jr.'s many accomplishments do not significantly contribute to his popularity... is ridiculous.

 

And regardless, it's not even in the same realm;

 

1) Grandson of Carroll Shelby, involved in the business and foundation...

 

vs.

 

2) Son of Dale Earnhardt with an accomplished motorsports career of his own...

 

IMO, only one of these would even KIND OF make sense to sign his father's - or grandfather's - commemorative motorsports diecast... and even Dale Jr. signing a #3 car would be a stretch...

 

Listen, I get it. We all respect Aaron and his family/business lineage, contributions to the foundation (I've said it myself to a point of beating a dead horse)... but again, IMO this does not legitimize it as a signature commemorating a historically significant diecast.

 

I almost think it might have been more accurate or correct to have Bob sign the diecast and Aaron sign the certificate of authenticity. Bob was the significant (and still available) commemorative signature and Aaron is the family figurehead that guaranteed it to be accurate and representative of the Shelby family name...

 

Obviously not ridiculous for the simple reason that there are many drivers who have many more accomplishments who are not near as popular. That you don't see this is very surprising; what else can I say. Anyway I'll stop now so as not to detract too much from the topic.

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I would rather see a family photo of Aaron and his legendary grandpa signed by Aaron. If it were a framed piece offered by the wonderful Foundation (which I have supported since it started as the Carroll Shelby Children's Foundation 25 years ago), I would purchase it as a contribution.

 

The Foundation Shop does need more items in their catalog. There used to be cases upon cases of posters, caps, shirts, die casts, medallions, etc. in the warehouse with new items from flashlights and pocket knives to books and a variety of collectables coming out every few months. I know as I have shelves and bins of this stuff. The selection seems more limited now. While I commend the effort to introduce new items, I just do not see the signature relevance. I have met Bob many times, but not Aaron, though, I appreciate that he has joined the Board as a hands on family member.

 

Actually, I would like to hear more updates on the status of Shelby Museum with the hope that the recent auction of CS' vehicles helped get it back on track. But I digress, sorry.

I think the Foundation lost a lot of items to the Shelby Store.

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For those that have that, I have a question-

In your opinion, do you feel that the brand has run its course and that because Carroll is no longer with us, any new product would lack legacy?

That is an interesting question that likely deserves its own thread.

 

Personally, the passing of Carroll Shelby has no impact his legacy and new products, however the actions and perceived motivations of the company absolutely do.

 

In this specific instance with Aaron's signature I have a strong doubt that this was a pre-arranged/planned signing. It was likely one done out of happenstance.

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+1000 svttim I THINK IT IS GREAT! AARON IS A DIRECT DESCENDENT AND IS ACTIVELY INVOLVED WITH HIS FORMER GRANDFATHER'S COMPANY. IF ANYONE HAS NOT NOTICED, HE DID SIGN THE BASE AND MR. BONDURANT SIGNED THE CAR, SO CLEARLY YOU CAN CONCLUDE AARON KEPT THE SIG OFF THE CAR FOR THE DRIVER. AT LEAST THAT IS WHAT I BELIEVE. NO MATTER WHAT, ARRON'S NAME DOES PLAY AN IMPORTANT ROLE FOR THE COMPANY TO KEEP CARROLLS DREAM AND LEGACY ALIVE. I, TOO, HAVE SOME SIGS ON MY CARS OF AARON, OR ANYONE WHOM I SEE FIT FOR MY MERCHINDISE. REMEMBER, COLLECTABILITY RELIES STRICTLY ON WHAT A BUYER WANTS TO PAY, REGARDLESS OF FAME OR SIGNIFICANTS. COLLECTABLE IS WHAT THE CURRENT OWNER CHERISHES ABOUT THAT ITEM/THING. JUST MY $.02

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I would rather see a family photo of Aaron and his legendary grandpa signed by Aaron. If it were a framed piece offered by the wonderful Foundation (which I have supported since it started as the Carroll Shelby Children's Foundation 25 years ago), I would purchase it as a contribution.

 

The Foundation Shop does need more items in their catalog. There used to be cases upon cases of posters, caps, shirts, die casts, medallions, etc. in the warehouse with new items from flashlights and pocket knives to books and a variety of collectables coming out every few months. I know as I have shelves and bins of this stuff. The selection seems more limited now. While I commend the effort to introduce new items, I just do not see the signature relevance. I have met Bob many times, but not Aaron, though, I appreciate that he has joined the Board as a hands on family member.

 

Actually, I would like to hear more updates on the status of Shelby Museum with the hope that the recent auction of CS' vehicles helped get it back on track. But I digress, sorry.

We did this exact thing at the Team Shelby dinner in Indianapolis. I designed this and Vance Irvin did the art work. There were two large limited edition canvas prints. One was given to Aaron as a gift, the other was auctioned off for the charity. It brought 1K. We had 8.5 x 11 copies for the attendee's.

 

20161223_081956_zpsflmejfsx_1.jpg

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We did this exact thing at the Team Shelby dinner in Indianapolis. I designed this and Vance Irwin did the art work. There were two large limited edition canvas prints. One was given to Aaron as a gift, the other was auctioned off for the charity. It brought 1K. We had 8.5 x 11 copies for the attendee's.

 

20161223_081956_zpsflmejfsx_1.jpg

 

Any 8.5 X 11 `s left?

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We did this exact thing at the Team Shelby dinner in Indianapolis. I designed this and Vance Irwin did the art work. There were two large limited edition canvas prints. One was given to Aaron as a gift, the other was auctioned off for the charity. It brought 1K. We had 8.5 x 11 copies for the attendee's.

 

20161223_081956_zpsflmejfsx_1.jpg

. I would not mind a 8x 11. Nice
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