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Sharing A Tire Incident - Tire Age Is Dangerous


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There have been a number of posts to the forum on when to change out your tires due to age:

 

I got a phone call from my wife, who was driving back from Dallas, Tx on I30 this week and she was pretty shaken up. She related all of a sudden the front end on her 1997 BMW Z3 began to shake and pull hard to the left at 60mph. She didn't know what caused it and had not hit anything in the road.

 

We had her car taken to Firestone in Texarkana the next day. I drove it and noted the same problems. I suspected a broken belt, but was not sure. It could have been out of alignment or slung a wheel weight. The owner called me and stated Barbie's Z3 had a tread seperation on the left front and her tires were 9 years old. The tread on them was about 90% as she only puts a couple of thousand miles on her car each year. We mainly drive our Tahoe. So what does this story have to do with a Shelby GT.

 

My 2008 Shelby GT was built in November of 2007 and I purchased it new in 2009. The tires appear to be new with only 7,300 miles on them and no visiable tire cracks. I garage park as many of us do. The moral to this story, I am going to purchase a new set of tires and get these off my Shelby. The tire shop said 5-6 six years max on tires and they need to be replaced. When I think of the possibility of a blow out and her driving this Z3 Convertible with tires that looked perfectly good, I remembered all the discussions on the forum about tire age and wanted to share this with friends.

 

I'll be buying a new set of Goodyear Speed Rated tires and getting these off my Shelby.

 

Regards..... gg

 

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Many States that have vehicle inspection laws put a 5 to 6 year age limit on tires. Check the date code. Some tires may be over a year old when the new car is finally sold. Forget the tread appearance and depth. Rubber ages. Stay safe and check the date code and replace at the recommended time. . .

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Tire Rack recommends no long than 8 yrs for tire use.

When I replace my 07SGT tires last year (w/6,303 miles) I asked for the most recent DOT tires they had in stock.

I always laugh when guys at car shows brag about driving to the show on +10 yrs old 'original tires.'

Just plan dumb.

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Glad you're wife is ok.

 

It is a toss-up. Depends on a lot of factors. Tire quality, age, U/V exposure, heat vs. cold, etc. I've known guys who've had tires 18 years w/out problems! I once owned two cars 8 years and never changed those tires. I agree with you though. I think these 2007 Shelby GT's (like mine) are becoming due for a tire change soon. I'll probably do mine next year. My wife's car is easy...she wears them out in less that 50K miles :lol:

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True story. My dad uses 80+ year old tires on some of his 80+ year old cars. Of course they don't go very fast, and once he has them up and running well he typically calls up ol' Corky at Coker tires and gets some reproductions.

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  • 1 month later...

Yehhhh....don't think I'll ever have this problem as my GT500 goes through tires in a little over a year of weekly use and the SGT probably every other year. I drive the HELL out of the cars on a regular basis though, especially hard cornering so it's expected. Good lesson to pass on though, as many don't drive like they stole it on a regular basis and can easily go 8+ years on a set of tires before the treads would wear down.

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They say that tires "age" from the inside out and condensation in the tire can cause the rot internally. I wonder if using nitrogen in the tires will help by reducing the moister?

 

I replaced a set on my 1970 Mach 1 a while back that look like new with little tread wear but upon checking the date code on the tire I found out they were 14 years old. Although they had plenty of tread they were very hard and I got a much better ride with the new tires.

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One thing that some of you may have experienced as well is dealing with trailer and RV tires. It's rare that I see them ever worn out as they are used only occasionally and sit for extended periods of time, but they blow out all of the time. It's for all the reasons that you mention.One thing I will say about the Nitrogen fill thing is that Oxygen is already mostly (80% I believe) Nitrogen. Also, when you mount a tire you don't suck out the oxgen, so you have 14.7 psi, or about 1/3 of the pressure level you'll need already in place. So you can see my feelings about Nitrogen in non-raing or high speed applications.

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One thing that some of you may have experienced as well is dealing with trailer and RV tires. It's rare that I see them ever worn out as they are used only occasionally and sit for extended periods of time, but they blow out all of the time. It's for all the reasons that you mention.One thing I will say about the Nitrogen fill thing is that Oxygen is already mostly (80% I believe) Nitrogen. Also, when you mount a tire you don't suck out the oxgen, so you have 14.7 psi, or about 1/3 of the pressure level you'll need already in place. So you can see my feelings about Nitrogen in non-raing or high speed applications.

 

 

So John, as somebody that is in the tire business, are there any advantages to using nitrogen in your tires other that stabilizing the air pressure from season to season? :cool:

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When in doubt you can decode the age:

 

https://www.tirerack.com/tires/tiretech/techpage.jsp?techid=11

 

This.

 

And don't forget the spare. On trucks I've owned I would take the best of the tire's being replaced and have it mounted on the spare wheel if the spare tire was up there in age.

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So John, as somebody that is in the tire business, are there any advantages to using nitrogen in your tires other that stabilizing the air pressure from season to season? :cool:

Bill, Other then the lack of air loss through the body of the tire (nitrogen molecules are large and don't bleed through)and the lessening of expansion due to thermal growth at high temps and speeds, I don't really see much advantage. Especially at the prices most places charge and the fact that oxygen is 80% nitrogen.

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Bill, Other then the lack of air loss through the body of the tire (nitrogen molecules are large and don't bleed through)and the lessening of expansion due to thermal growth at high temps and speeds, I don't really see much advantage. Especially at the prices most places charge and the fact that oxygen is 80% nitrogen.

 

Hey, I'm no scientist, but last time I checked oxygen is 100% oxygen... :read:

 

But you're right, nitrogen is used on track cars to reduce the expansion (pressure rise) when heated. Primarily, because it's dry and doesn't have the moisture of air.

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I guess I should have said air is 80% nitrogen (it's actually 78%). Oxygen comprises almost 21% if the air we breath, with everything else being less than 1% or only race elements.

 

How can I get my tires filled with those race elements?

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