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5.0 Magazine Suspension Article


stevenh
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Sometime between around January and March either 5.0 Mustang magazine or Mustangs & Fast Fords magazine did a thorough article about a complete GT500 suspension upgrade. The work was all handled by some mod shop back east. It answered every question any of us could have. So I go to get the mag in preparation of getting the work done and the wife tossed it. Does anybody know which article that was so I can try and get another copy. Thanks

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Sometime between around January and March either 5.0 Mustang magazine or Mustangs & Fast Fords magazine did a thorough article about a complete GT500 suspension upgrade. The work was all handled by some mod shop back east. It answered every question any of us could have. So I go to get the mag in preparation of getting the work done and the wife tossed it. Does anybody know which article that was so I can try and get another copy. Thanks

Hopefully not the article about Kenny Brown Performance, their parts are junk. Kenny Brown had an article in one of the magazines you've listed in the last 6 months. If you really want something that works, look at CorteX Racing. If you use the CorteX Torque Arm, Watts Link, and rear Lower Control Arms and relocation brackets, with a good set of springs and shocks you'll be more than happy with the outcome.

 

I installed Kenny Brown parts on my car and removed them after seeing a major structural failure of a K-member in another car. I also bent the relocation/lowering brackets for the panhard bar on my car.

 

Magazines only see the results of the mods for a few days afterwards and never see the long term results or the pitfalls of the products. I laughed at the article when I read about the Kenny Brown junk in the magazine. Don't believe everything you see in print, because it isn't tested long term in the real world environment that you will put your car through. I'm positive most of these manufacturers and shops set these articles up long before they are written or the writer even sees the product. The manufacturer is going to make sure everything is set up for a favorable review and knows the pitfalls of the product, before they allow someone to test it. You as the manufacturer than limit the testing in your favor for a great review.

Edited by Mr. Haney
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Thanks, I did see that one but not the one I was thinking about. I read it quick at the airport, I think kit was primarily BMR stuff but can't remember.

 

A guy from BMR (Keith is it?) is active on this site and the SVT Perf. site. Find him and he would know what you are looking for, it if was BMR.

 

 

Phill

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Just for added opinions, I have some of the Kenny Brown suspension and could not be any happier the way it performs and the control I now have.

 

On a side note 5.0 mag for the 2013 King of the Street said the GT500 with Kenny Brown setup up is one of the best handling KOTS cars ever.

 

When it was time to bring the car to a halt, the brakes were outstanding. With Baer six-piston brakes front and rear, you could probably look at the brake pedal and the car would stop. Not only that, thanks to the aforementioned Kenny Brown suspension and chassis upgrades, Phillip’s Shelby is probably the best-handling KOTS car ever. Many cars feel like there’s a front end and a back end, many times working against each other. Phillip’s car, however, felt like one solid unit, with the front and back working together in unison to handle the curves and keep coming back for more.

Read more: http://www.mustangandfords.com/events/1405-king-of-the-street-2013-twelve/#ixzz36MAEdkS2

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A guy from BMR (Keith is it?) is active on this site and the SVT Perf. site. Find him and he would know what you are looking for, it if was BMR.

 

 

Phill

 

Phil's spot on- he is thinking of Kelly. He's the ford tech at BMR and quite possibly one of the most responsive and customer service oriented individuals I have had dealings with in this industry.

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Thanks for the kind words.

 

If any of you ever need any help with anything suspension related, please don't hesitate top ask me (calling is best)

 

Kelly

 

Kelly,

 

I'm glad you chimed in here. The timing is perfect.

 

I'm having a "situation" with my Shelby (BMR) K-member and/or A-arms. I centered my strut tower tops with CS/MM Caster-Camber plates then recentered my rear axle housing (also Shelby/BMR panhard bar and brace) then went to string my toe to make sure the front was straight.

 

I found my front track was off center to the right by 1" (2" total on the left, 0" to the right). I had this situation once before but can't remember if the K-member was shifted to the right or left but I remedied it...or so I thought. By using my fingers up along the frame rails between the K-member and rail the member is only slightly off to the right but certainly not by a full inch.

 

Then with the front of the car up on stands I took a plumb line reading again and with the wheels hanging, they seem to be perfect. So either something shfted from lifting/hanging it or something strange is happening with A-arm length (longer a-arm on one side???).

 

I'll set the wheels down on ramps and re-plumb the front track again so see if something is shifting or not but this one has me scratching my head.

 

Anything come to mind?

 

In Short: Front wheels sit 1" to the right of center. Plumb line has 2" space to tire on left, 0" on right. Until I hang the front wheels, then about 1/2" space between both right and left (from fender lip).

 

 

TIA,

Phill Pollard

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Hmmmm...

 

I cannot say I have ever heard of that. I mean, I have seen instances where there may be up to maybe 1/2"....and it is usually remedied easily, by loosening and shifting, but 1" seems extreme; really extreme.

 

Our components are built on jigs that are checked 3-4 times per year, by placing the OEM components on them, and our tolerances typically run tight in the 1/16" range, sometimes up to 1/8" or so.

 

The best way to resolve your issue is by process of elimination.

 

My recommendation is:

 

-Place the car on jack stands, as level as possible

-Remove wheels/tires and strut assembly.

-Remove spindle

 

With only the a-arm end (ball joint) available for measuring, place something under each unit (a-arm) until they are exactly the same height - as parallel as possible.

 

Plumb bob/line the ball joints or the edge of the arms in relation to the string hanging from your fenders. Just like we recommend for aligning the rear with the panhard bar.

 

This should give you a better idea of how far out your track width is, side to side. Or in other words, this will be the best way to ensure the foundation is aligned properly to the chassis.

 

It is not uncommon to have the track width relation of the front VS rear, to be off slightly. As a matter of fact, an OEM S197 sometimes has 1/2" or so of difference in the alignment of the front system to the rear axle assembly.

 

The most important measurements will be your thrust angle and wheel base - to ensure the car is square and tracking straight. Of course, the other areas of the alignment are very crucial as well, but you have to get the foundation "true" before having confidence in your camber, caster and toe settings.

 

Keep me updated.

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Hmmmm...

 

I cannot say I have ever heard of that. I mean, I have seen instances where there may be up to maybe 1/2"....and it is usually remedied easily, by loosening and shifting, but 1" seems extreme; really extreme.

 

Our components are built on jigs that are checked 3-4 times per year, by placing the OEM components on them, and our tolerances typically run tight in the 1/16" range, sometimes up to 1/8" or so.

 

The best way to resolve your issue is by process of elimination.

 

My recommendation is:

 

-Place the car on jack stands, as level as possible

-Remove wheels/tires and strut assembly.

-Remove spindle

 

With only the a-arm end (ball joint) available for measuring, place something under each unit (a-arm) until they are exactly the same height - as parallel as possible.

 

Plumb bob/line the ball joints or the edge of the arms in relation to the string hanging from your fenders. Just like we recommend for aligning the rear with the panhard bar.

 

This should give you a better idea of how far out your track width is, side to side. Or in other words, this will be the best way to ensure the foundation is aligned properly to the chassis.

 

It is not uncommon to have the track width relation of the front VS rear, to be off slightly. As a matter of fact, an OEM S197 sometimes has 1/2" or so of difference in the alignment of the front system to the rear axle assembly.

 

The most important measurements will be your thrust angle and wheel base - to ensure the car is square and tracking straight. Of course, the other areas of the alignment are very crucial as well, but you have to get the foundation "true" before having confidence in your camber, caster and toe settings.

 

Keep me updated.

 

It gets stranger...

 

After finding the initial off-center track, then finding it centered while the wheels are hanging, I put the front wheels down on ramps with my Tanner Race turnstyles on the ramps.

 

Now the wheels/track is centered. Using a plumb bob there is right about 1/2" to the lip on the wheel from the fender lip, on both sides.

 

SOMETHING is moving/shifting. And I don't think it's the K-member. I ran a bolt check on all fasteners and all is tight. The only thing *remotely* close to loose were the two nylock looking nuts on the rear A-arm mount (with the poly looking washers/shims on them).

 

Ball joints are tight, struts are tight, a-arms are tight, k-member is tight.

 

I've noticed a "clunk" when backing up out of my driveway with the front wheels turned hard to left. It sounds like something shifts but at a friends house it happened multiple times (clunk-clunk-clunk) so I thought it was the wheels skipping over the asphalt rather than the subframe moving. Now I'm not at all sure what it is. I did have a ton of Camber in the wheels (which is why I centered the struts to start this latest project off with) and thought that would cause the wheels to skip but again, not so sure now.

 

I'm still looking. I'll set the toe and then put it back up and look some more. This one has me scratching my head.....

 

 

Phill

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When i put the FRPP suspension in I torqued everything to spec, however, I did have an occasional clunk from the front that I couldn't quite figure out. Went to the alignment shop to get some work done...turns out that the swaybar link nuts on one side still weren't tight enough. The tech hit them with his air gun and no more noise. You could tell on the strut and the swaybar that they had movement from wear marks. Just throwin' it out there.

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Just for added opinions, I have some of the Kenny Brown suspension and could not be any happier the way it performs and the control I now have.

 

On a side note 5.0 mag for the 2013 King of the Street said the GT500 with Kenny Brown setup up is one of the best handling KOTS cars ever.

 

When it was time to bring the car to a halt, the brakes were outstanding. With Baer six-piston brakes front and rear, you could probably look at the brake pedal and the car would stop. Not only that, thanks to the aforementioned Kenny Brown suspension and chassis upgrades, Phillip’s Shelby is probably the best-handling KOTS car ever. Many cars feel like there’s a front end and a back end, many times working against each other. Phillip’s car, however, felt like one solid unit, with the front and back working together in unison to handle the curves and keep coming back for more.

 

Read more: http://www.mustangandfords.com/events/1405-king-of-the-street-2013-twelve/#ixzz36MAEdkS2

Here is a Kenny Brown K-Member = junk

 

IMG_0192.jpg

Edited by Mr. Haney
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