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Need some advice on removing my transmission


SteelSteeds

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I've done some searching, but haven't found anything detailed enough. I've spent two days now working at pulling my transmission to replace the clutch. I thought today was going to be the day: exhaust is out, driveshaft is out, shifter is out, got all the wiring removed (broke one of the clips, grumble), and I got 5 bellhousing bolts loose. All that's left, as far as I know, is the last 2 bellhousing bolts and the hydraulic fitting. I also see one other tube at the top of the transmission, but I have no idea what it is.

My problem is that I cannot find any way to access those top two bolts. How is it done? I've tipped the whole engine/transmission assembly as far back as it will go, until hoses/fittings behind the supercharger start complaining against the firewall, and there is no room. I can see one of the bolts with a mirror, and if I REALLY contort my arm, I can just barely touch it with the tip of one finger. The other bolt (passenger side) is out of the question.

 

My other question is the fitting. It looks like it just has a c clip and then pulls off? When it comes off, how much fluid should I be ready for?

 

Most people just look at me like I'm insane, and ask why I haven't paid someone else to do it for me. Well, because I am insane, that's why.

 

Any help/suggestions greatly appreciated. I'm doing this on a creeper, with the car on Race Ramps. Really want to get that Spec clutch installed, I haven't driven the car in 6 months, and the weather is beautiful here now...

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It's not quite as heavy as I thought it would be, definitely lighter than the C6 out of my Bronco. Still, I am going slowly and carefully. Is that vent tube something that has enough slack to disconnect as I'm lowering the transmission, or do I need to disconnect it at its other end?

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It's not quite as heavy as I thought it would be, definitely lighter than the C6 out of my Bronco. Still, I am going slowly and carefully. Is that vent tube something that has enough slack to disconnect as I'm lowering the transmission, or do I need to disconnect it at its other end?

 

 

 

Man I hear ya! I've had the E4OD out of my 96 Bronco several times............what a bitch!

 

 

Sorry I can't help you on the 500..........I just got mine and I haven't had to get to my clutch yet, but I fear it's not too far off

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Search one of Grabber's transmissions posts, one of them has a bunch of photos he took during his clutch swap that may prove helpful.

That being said, I usually go after those top two bolts from the rear of the tranny with a long extension and swivel on the socket end. Not to be negative but getting them out is easier than getting them back in.

Chip

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Search one of Grabber's transmissions posts, one of them has a bunch of photos he took during his clutch swap that may prove helpful.

That being said, I usually go after those top two bolts from the rear of the tranny with a long extension and swivel on the socket end. Not to be negative but getting them out is easier than getting them back in.

Chip

 

 

Trust me, I've been through Grabber's posts with a fine toothed comb! He even sent me extra ones, but the actual removal of the transmission is somewhat glossed over. There are way more pictures of the clutch/flywheel, etc.

It seems like I may have to either remove some of the hoses behind the supercharger to gain more tip, or pull the motor mounts off to lower the whole assembly for better access. I hate to go the extra work if it isn't necessary, but I'm just not seeing any other way at the moment.

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Trust me, I've been through Grabber's posts with a fine toothed comb! He even sent me extra ones, but the actual removal of the transmission is somewhat glossed over. There are way more pictures of the clutch/flywheel, etc.

It seems like I may have to either remove some of the hoses behind the supercharger to gain more tip, or pull the motor mounts off to lower the whole assembly for better access. I hate to go the extra work if it isn't necessary, but I'm just not seeing any other way at the moment.

 

 

You might try loosening the cradle bolts..... that will let it drop a little more. I have loosened the front cradle bolts and removed the rears before. Another thing you could do is remove the cradle bolts one at a time and replace them with longer ones to give it more room to drop. Once you are finished you can put the stock bolts back in.

Chip

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Most people just look at me like I'm insane, and ask why I haven't paid someone else to do it for me. Well, because I am insane, that's why.

 

 

 

 

:confused:

 

 

:hysterical::hysterical2::hysterical:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

:lurk:

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Will you have the work done in time for the meet and greet Aug. 10th ? :titanic:

 

Absolutely! I was considering going to the Griot's Garage open house on May 19th, but I am far from convinced that I will have the Shelby mobile by then...

On my way to the shop now, despite a bit of a hangover. We shall see what today brings.

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Qapla!

 

A3127914-7A01-48CE-869A-64A3B0B26E2A-5636-000002FA0A367012_zpsde292cad.jpg

 

The transmission is out.

 

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My observations:

 

This is not a one person job. I would never have gotten that thing out of there alone. Maybe the dealer tech, with all the latest and greatest tools can, but I can't imagine getting this done without the help of a friend who stopped by unexpectedly. A friend with some transmission experience no less.

I now understand what was said about rotating the transmission. I was under the mistaken impression that the tranny needed to be "unlocked" somehow the way people kept talking. But no, it comes off just like any other transmission. The rotation is necessary to allow the bellhousing to clear the tunnel. And we had to spin that sucker a complete 180 degrees to get it out.

The transmission is heavy, but not unreasonable. As I guessed, lighter than a C6 automatic, but considerably heavier than a T5.

The top two bolts are a nightmare. Not only are they very hard to access, but those suckers are torqued down TIGHT. Considerable force is required, and having a bunch of extensions and wobble joints diminishes your available torque, so you have to use even more force. We had to use big breaker bars.

Wobble joints are a necessity. I didn't have any, but I will soon. My friend went home and got his. Very long extensions, wobble joints and one U-joint were all used to get those top two bolts out.

Removing the heat shields and insulation help. I didn't think it would make much difference, but it allowed a bit more clearance and way better visibility as to what we were trying to do.

 

I had way less dust than most people seem to have. I stopped driving it the day I noticed slipping, so that may have been part of it, but I was still surprised how little is in there.

This week I'll get my Spec SS-trim clutch set up and installed, and I hope to get the transmission back in place next weekend...

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Best laid plans, etc...

 

Getting sick tends to throw a wrench into any plans. My daughter was sick for several days, now I get to sit here suffering while it is 80 degrees and sunny outside. Grumble...

 

I did manage to get the factory clutch and flywheel out during the week, but couldn't get the pilot bearing out using the tried and true hydraulic method. Looks like I'll be buying a suitable bearing puller. I planned to get to the shop this weekend and try to finish up. Exceedingly doubtful that will happen at this point. MIght be another week, at least, before I get another block of time to spend on it.

 

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When I first looked at the clutch, I thought it looked really worn. But then I looked at the new SPEC clutch, and was rather surprised how little material each of those paddles actually has on it.

 

E68D0C70-7DBF-4E63-8EFD-4548FE7355CE-646-000000317D255EEA_zps813e5bb1.jpg

 

A fair bit of clutch dust on the flywheel, still not as much as I was expecting.

 

01A07A20-10B5-47BF-9381-657C5959970C-646-00000031886CC326_zps952cbe85.jpg

 

Can't seem to get that little sucker out of there using grease and a suitably sized socket. That method has always worked for me in the past...

 

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Quite a bit of wear evident on the stock flywheel.

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The new flywheel is installed, torqued to factory specs, red threadlocker applied to the bolts as directed by SPEC.

 

70471B6A-2F36-42D2-9514-E3B6A40C82EA-3650-000001EBC5B8A87E_zps0dc310e1.jpg

 

That pilot bearing was a PAIN to get out. Had to go buy a slide hammer puller, and even then I pulled the race out of the bearing first, and then finally managed to yank it out by using the slide hammer with all I had. I've never seen a pilot bearing that hard to get out. The new one tapped in relatively easily.

 

I'm not going to get much shop time for a while, no idea when this will be done... I'm hoping to get an hour or two tomorrow, but I have a lot on my plate. Won't be making the Griot's Garage meet, my wife made other plans for that weekend.

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Most people just look at me like I'm insane, and ask why I haven't paid someone else to do it for me. Well, because I am insane, that's why.

I didn't agree with insane until reading your next sentence "...on a creeper with the car on Race Ramps..." NUTS might be more fitting

However, after reading the later posts you obviously are progressing nicely!

 

Fingers crossed that on re-install the tranny slides in & lines up, then bellhousing bolts play well

Best of Luck!

 

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  • 2 months later...

Still working on it! Yes, more than 3 months in, still not done. What a PAIN. I managed to get the transmission back up in the tunnel and spun into position alone. Just about killed me, but I was smugly satisfied when I got it in there. But... I couldn't get the transmission to line up and slide together. After hours spent straining, pushing, pulling, yelling like a madman, and eventually hurting myself, I gave up and called for reinforcements. My friend who helped me get it out had been out of town for over a month doing an out of town job. He finally returned, just in time to keep me from taking a sledgehammer to my Shelby.

It took the two of us 2.5 hours to move the transmission and inch and a half. About an hour of that was dealing with the wiring harness that had slipped down between the block and bellhousing.

Anyone doing this job in the future, do yourself a favor and zip tie that sucker out of the way before you put the transmission back up in there...

 

Anyway, the transmission is now fully bolted into place and all the bolts torqued down, crossmember installed, and I have the hydraulic line hooked up. Still have a number of things to do (shifter, wiring, heat shielding, exhaust, driveshaft, braces), but I am well and truly on the downhill side. Won't get any shop time this weekend, hopefully a couple of evenings and part of next weekend. I have to get it running so I can start cleaning it for the meet!

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You'll be seeing the King Cobra in the morning, my friend. I am bringing it to the NWM&CF show! But, I will have my Shelby done for the meet, guaranteed. Though I will probably still be in the break-in period on the new clutch, so I may have to be a little less... spirited on the drive.

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You'll be seeing the King Cobra in the morning, my friend. I am bringing it to the NWM&CF show! But, I will have my Shelby done for the meet, guaranteed. Though I will probably still be in the break-in period on the new clutch, so I may have to be a little less... spirited on the drive.

Glad you can make it today. See you soon my friend.

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  • 3 weeks later...

It is DONE.

 

 

Man, what a job. Granted, I made it worse (as I tend to do) by adding in "extras" along the way. I was determined to get it back on the road by this weekend, so I put in a couple (more) late nights. Just before 1:00am Monday night/Tuesday morning, I rolled the Shelby off the Race Ramps and turned the key for the first time in almost exactly 9 months. What a great feeling! All of the work finally paying off...

 

My report:

 

I love the SPEC clutch. I read a TON of pros and cons before deciding to go for it, knowing a lot of people had problems. I hesitated a bit more since I was doing this job by myself, no professional support, but after talking it over with Alex and a few other people, trusted my skills and pulled the trigger.

 

The clutch effort seems slightly higher than stock, but not bad. Engagement is significantly closer to the floor than it was, but that's not really surprising given how worn the stocker was. It took a few minutes to get used to, and I did stall once. I am getting no shudder/chatter at all on takeoff in 1st. I did get a small shudder once today when backing uphill out of a parallel parking space. This clutch seems easier to engage smoothly than the stock clutch, to me. It is a bit more direct, more aggressive, but I got used to it within the first few blocks of driving.

I have been driving it conservatively, as recommended, so I will update my opinions after the obligatory 300+ mile break-in period. I can't wait...

I do notice the noise when the clutch pedal is depressed. It's odd that it's exactly the opposite of the OEM clutch. With the factory unit, you could hear what sounded like gear rollover noise when you put the transmission in neutral and let the clutch pedal out. With the SPEC clutch, that condition has no noise at all. But, with the clutch pedal depressed there is a slightly different noise, more of a rattle, that is quite evident outside of the car. I hear it in the car too, just slightly louder than the previous noise, but last night as I came down the alley behind my house, coasting with the clutch depressed and the windows down, with walls on both sides of me, I was surprised at how loud it was. While I would prefer that the noise were quieter, or non-existent, it doesn't really bother me, and I am happy to ignore it given all the other benefits thus far.

The lightweight aluminum flywheel makes a noticeable difference in the way the car revs! The tach climbs much more quickly than before, I am going to have to re-learn how to rev-match when I downshift. Right now if I blip the throttle as I was used to doing previously, the motor revs much too high, and engaging the clutch has to bring it back down. Not ideal, so I'm trying to use much less pressure to get the right amount of revs. That will take a bit more practice, I've only got 40 miles on the new combo.

 

I made a number of changes aside from just the new clutch kit. As I had mentioned, I removed my Shelby short-throw shifter and replaced it with an MGW shifter. So far I like it, though I have to admit it isn't a huge difference. It is a bit firmer when in gear, which was one of my complaints, but during the install I determined that the main reason there is slop in the shifter when in gear is the linkage, not the shifter itself. There is a joint in the linkage to accommodate the different angles required, and, well, it's sloppy. And I don't think there's really any way around it without compromising the reach into all 7 locations.

The shifts are good, though still not as precise as they are on the T-5 transmission in my '78. I will play with the settings, I have it set at a 6 out of 10. The manual said most people prefer to be in the 4-6 range, but I may end up at 7 or 8. Part of the reason I need a shorter shift is that I have a rather tall pistol-grip shift knob, so the throw is a bit longer than it would be with a simple ball on the end of the shifter. But, I like it, and it has the button for the line-lock on top of it...

I drained my transmission and filled it with the proper amount of Royal Purple Synchromax

I did a complete brake system flush and bleed with the OEM brake fluid.

I installed a new BMR upper control arm and heavy duty UCA mount.

I installed a new Steeda adjustable Panhard Bar and heavy duty Panhard Brace.

While I had the console out, I pulled the stereo out and installed a Parrot Bluetooth unit, mounting a screen to the passenger side of the center stack and running cables to the console for iPhone/USB hookup. I'd like to shake the hand of the Ford engineer who installed that little pop-out panel inside the console. Made it a breeze to drill the right size hole in that piece on the bench, insert the wire grommet, and pop it back in place for a completely factory-look install.

 

All that I have left to do now over the next 8 days is detail the car, run the wire for the Bluetooth microphone, swap my new SVTPP wheels and tires onto the car, flash the computer for the new tire size, and train the TPMS sensors. And smile a lot, while I enjoy driving my Shelby again. :shift:

 

 

 

 

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  • 1 month later...

Awesome thread...wish I would have seen this earlier. I am doing the same thing right now with a Spec Twin also. We had one hell of a time getting the trans back far enough to drop down...but got it last night. Anyone try droping the rear of the engine to see if it helps in the install of the new? Going tonight to attempt it....o boy.

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