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2007-08 Shelby vs 1966-68 Fastback


Shelby2809

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I know this comes down to personal preference, but I would love you hear thoughts on which way you would go and why.

 

I came close yesterday to purchasing a 2008 Shelby GT, but it was sold at an auction while I waited for the dealer to "bring it back". As you all know, the Shelby guys are a special bunch and one of you offered to help me find another. I've been looking at 2007-08 SGT's in the $25,000 range (sadly, I sold my supercharged 07 SGT for $28500 2 years ago), while looking I've also looked at some 1966-68 fastback's and there are some in the same price range. Example below. Can you Shelby guys give me feedback, maybe some pro's and con's on the choices? Thank you in advance for your help,

 

Jim

 

Favorite SGT:

http://cgi.ebay.com/ebaymotors/2007-Ford-Mustang-SHELBY-GT-5k-miles-1-owner-garaged-since-new-showroom-/300891918134?_trksid=p3984.m1423.l2649&ssPageName=STRK:MEWAX:IT&forcev4exp=true#ht_23190wt_1183

 

Favorite Fastback:

http://cgi.ebay.com/ebaymotors/Ford-/281092638015?_trksid=p3984.m1423.l2649&ssPageName=STRK:MEWAX:IT&forcev4exp=true#ht_667wt_1183

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If it is not a daily driver, the classics are always an eye catcher on any road or venue. Having said that, I love my creature comforts like air conditioning, power steering, power brakes and windows, adjustable steering wheels, SAT radio, navigation, etc. If I could find a classic that had many of those features with little body rust I would seriously consider it.

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Personally, I'd get the Shelby and WANT an early model. That's exactly the situation I am in now LOL!!

 

The 66 is always going to need something maintained, whereas the Shelby won't.

 

The Shelby is, well, a Shelby, whereas the 66 isn't.

 

You really miss the SGT you had for certain reasons. Will the 66 erase those reasons?

 

 

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I've had a '65 and/or '66 stang in the stable for the past 20 years and always will have. I would never give up a vintage fastback or convertible for a late model. That being said, I recently sold my '65 Fastback GT350 clone so I could acquire a 2006 GT-H. I wouldn't have done it if I didn't have a '66 convertible to keep my vintage appetite suppressed. If you are looking for a vintage car, do yourself a huge favor and figure out exactly what you want now - that car is out there. Buy one that doesn't need any work and that is rust free. Original sheetmetal is very much worth the premium price. Rebuilt rust buckets are usually what you find so do you due diligence and have an expert inspect any such car in person. Pay for this to be done and you won't be sorry. If you want a GT350 clone, there is a LOT of junk out there. Figure out how to determine the good ones from the bad ones. The one on ebay you linked to is a bad one IMHO if coming close to what a GT350 should be is important to you.

 

For the same money ($25K) you will have a hard time finding a nice fastback that doesn't have issues or hidden stories. $30-35K would be the budget I would set aside for the right car, and that will save you money in the long run. Insuring and maintaining registration on a $35K vintage fastback is very cheap - much cheaper than doing the same on a late model Shelby that is NOT appreciating.

 

As for the differences - a late model Shelby and an early fastback are totally different animals. I prefer the visceral experience of loud pipes, smelly exhaust, manual steering/braking, and total attention to what you are doing at all times. If you want to sip your latte and talk on your phone while driving with the radio on stay away from a vintage Mustang.

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I've had a '65 and/or '66 stang in the stable for the past 20 years and always will have. I would never give up a vintage fastback or convertible for a late model. That being said, I recently sold my '65 Fastback GT350 clone so I could acquire a 2006 GT-H. I wouldn't have done it if I didn't have a '66 convertible to keep my vintage appetite suppressed. If you are looking for a vintage car, do yourself a huge favor and figure out exactly what you want now - that car is out there. Buy one that doesn't need any work and that is rust free. Original sheetmetal is very much worth the premium price. Rebuilt rust buckets are usually what you find so do you due diligence and have an expert inspect any such car in person. Pay for this to be done and you won't be sorry. If you want a GT350 clone, there is a LOT of junk out there. Figure out how to determine the good ones from the bad ones. The one on ebay you linked to is a bad one IMHO if coming close to what a GT350 should be is important to you.

 

For the same money ($25K) you will have a hard time finding a nice fastback that doesn't have issues or hidden stories. $30-35K would be the budget I would set aside for the right car, and that will save you money in the long run. Insuring and maintaining registration on a $35K vintage fastback is very cheap - much cheaper than doing the same on a late model Shelby that is NOT appreciating.

 

As for the differences - a late model Shelby and an early fastback are totally different animals. I prefer the visceral experience of loud pipes, smelly exhaust, manual steering/braking, and total attention to what you are doing at all times. If you want to sip your latte and talk on your phone while driving with the radio on stay away from a vintage Mustang.

 

AMEN! I wish I was in the position to have a classic in the stable too, but I'll probably have to wait quite a while.

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Good points, all. ilmor, agreed and leaning that way for the same reason... will the '66 erase my longing for my '07 SGT. Please keep them coming, this truly does help, and who here doesn't like talking about cars. :)

That is a good question to ask yourself. A lot of good and correct points from everyone regarding the classics. What I also like is out here in CA, my car is smog exempt! Here is my point of view as a vintage owner. I 100% do not regret getting my 65 fastback instead of an 05 or 06 GT Mustang at the time. I am sure I would have sent a GT to have it converted to a Shelby GT or SGT if I chose that route. Sometimes I often think that I could easily sell my 65 to get into a newer Shelby, but I look at my car and think that the classic is just sooo cool. I will tell you that as a daily driver, my car gets exposed to the public everyday and I love it. I always get attention by all walks of life. I always get treated with smiles and thumbs up, never a " you wanna race? " Its like people have more respect for a classic than seeing it as a "how fast can it go kind of car? " People love seeing it on the road because, lets face it, there are not that many people driving them on the road today. To me, that is the icing on the cake of owning a classic. As you already know, the classic Mustang can be built to your liking in a number of ways; performance, creature comforts, modern technology. Yeah, it will cost you, but doesn't everything in life. I opted to keep the cost down and I am restoring my car little by little towards the Shelby way from the good ol' days, with minimal personal and technological additions. Besides, I am more into simplicity! I do love seeing the new cars out there and hearing them, but there is something about hearing a sm block going thumpity-thump from good old 60's V8 technology. I could pull out a chair and just enjoy the sound for hours. I love the fact that my wife says that she can hear my car down the street coming towards the house. If I ever have a chance to get a newer Mustang or Shelby, it will be an addition, not a replacement! So my opinion is get the classic and pick up a newer Shelby later. Whatever you choose, enjoy and happy driving! Just remember at least one thing, post pics of your choice.
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I've had a '65 and/or '66 stang in the stable for the past 20 years and always will have. I would never give up a vintage fastback or convertible for a late model. That being said, I recently sold my '65 Fastback GT350 clone so I could acquire a 2006 GT-H. I wouldn't have done it if I didn't have a '66 convertible to keep my vintage appetite suppressed. If you are looking for a vintage car, do yourself a huge favor and figure out exactly what you want now - that car is out there. Buy one that doesn't need any work and that is rust free. Original sheetmetal is very much worth the premium price. Rebuilt rust buckets are usually what you find so do you due diligence and have an expert inspect any such car in person. Pay for this to be done and you won't be sorry. If you want a GT350 clone, there is a LOT of junk out there. Figure out how to determine the good ones from the bad ones. The one on ebay you linked to is a bad one IMHO if coming close to what a GT350 should be is important to you.

 

For the same money ($25K) you will have a hard time finding a nice fastback that doesn't have issues or hidden stories. $30-35K would be the budget I would set aside for the right car, and that will save you money in the long run. Insuring and maintaining registration on a $35K vintage fastback is very cheap - much cheaper than doing the same on a late model Shelby that is NOT appreciating.

 

As for the differences - a late model Shelby and an early fastback are totally different animals. I prefer the visceral experience of loud pipes, smelly exhaust, manual steering/braking, and total attention to what you are doing at all times. If you want to sip your latte and talk on your phone while driving with the radio on stay away from a vintage Mustang.

That is a good question to ask yourself. A lot of good and correct points from everyone regarding the classics. What I also like is out here in CA, my car is smog exempt! Here is my point of view as a vintage owner. I 100% do not regret getting my 65 fastback instead of an 05 or 06 GT Mustang at the time. I am sure I would have sent a GT to have it converted to a Shelby GT or SGT if I chose that route. Sometimes I often think that I could easily sell my 65 to get into a newer Shelby, but I look at my car and think that the classic is just sooo cool. I will tell you that as a daily driver, my car gets exposed to the public everyday and I love it. I always get attention by all walks of life. I always get treated with smiles and thumbs up, never a " you wanna race? " Its like people have more respect for a classic than seeing it as a "how fast can it go kind of car? " People love seeing it on the road because, lets face it, there are not that many people driving them on the road today. To me, that is the icing on the cake of owning a classic. As you already know, the classic Mustang can be built to your liking in a number of ways; performance, creature comforts, modern technology. Yeah, it will cost you, but doesn't everything in life. I opted to keep the cost down and I am restoring my car little by little towards the Shelby way from the good ol' days, with minimal personal and technological additions. Besides, I am more into simplicity! I do love seeing the new cars out there and hearing them, but there is something about hearing a sm block going thumpity-thump from good old 60's V8 technology. I could pull out a chair and just enjoy the sound for hours. I love the fact that my wife says that she can hear my car down the street coming towards the house. If I ever have a chance to get a newer Mustang or Shelby, it will be an addition, not a replacement! So my opinion is get the classic and pick up a newer Shelby later. Whatever you choose, enjoy and happy driving! Just remember at least one thing, post pics of your choice.

 

I am very thankful to have two more classic car guys respond with such detail. And I agree, the '66 I listed isn't a recreation fitting to the classic Shelby. Truly, my perfect classic is a '67 fastback and you are right, if I want a classic I should get exactly what I want and not "settle". I also agree, the price for a clean classic is in the $30-39 range. I found an '08 Shelby, priced right and a classic '67 priced right ($39k). I will do some soul searching over the weekend and make a decision on Monday. Many thanks for all the help and if I do go with a classic, I may have to enlist the classic guys for their eyes. I was born in '74, so I don't know the right look for a "tribute" car, I may think something looks cool, but the guys in the know will think it looks wrong. Thanks as always, this Shelby forum truly has the best of people.

 

Jim

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We have 3 Vintage show, cruise- nice weather cars and I love driving them --- BUT you said "FAMILY" which I take to mean maybe you have kids. My choice would be the SHELBY - my reason would be SAFETY - you have airbags and crash protection - you never know when you will need it and hopefully you won't - nice to know that it's there.

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Also born in '74... Never too old to stop learning. Like I said, $30-35K should get you there in today's market (65-66 cars). If somebody is asking nearer $40K for an early fastback it better be special. Of course, it's easy to invest 50-100K getting a car worth $25K if you start with the wrong car. Stock cars are worth more than modified cars on the resale market - the exception to this is that if it is modified in the direction of a factory car (ie Shelby Clone) and done correctly with period correct modifications/parts than you can usually recoup the modification costs at resale. I sold my '65 in December and it took less than 2 weeks. It started out as an ugly C code in pea soup green. I enjoyed it as a white/blue GT350 clone and was able to sell it for far more than if it was kept factory stock. Simply slapping on a pair of stripes does not make a Mustang a Shelby clone!!!!!!

 

As for '65/'66 vs '67 - expect to pay $8-10K more for a properly executed '67 clone as it is much harder to build than a '65/66.

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I have two late model weekend cars and would vote the Shelby GT.

The Shelby GT will start on Sat/Sun mornings (or should anyway!) and if you have a family, this will allow more time with them VS wrenching on an older model.

I had a '66 and spent more time under it than in it...

 

If you look at SPP you can buy enough 'stuff' to satisfy the wrenching desire.

Just a view from someone born in 1960.

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I am very thankful to have two more classic car guys respond with such detail. And I agree, the '66 I listed isn't a recreation fitting to the classic Shelby. Truly, my perfect classic is a '67 fastback and you are right, if I want a classic I should get exactly what I want and not "settle". I also agree, the price for a clean classic is in the $30-39 range. I found an '08 Shelby, priced right and a classic '67 priced right ($39k). I will do some soul searching over the weekend and make a decision on Monday. Many thanks for all the help and if I do go with a classic, I may have to enlist the classic guys for their eyes. I was born in '74, so I don't know the right look for a "tribute" car, I may think something looks cool, but the guys in the know will think it looks wrong. Thanks as always, this Shelby forum truly has the best of people.

 

Jim

 

Your welcome Jim. I, too, was born in 74. Your age has nothing to do with knowledge. I learned a lot by reading up and observation. I got the classic Mustang bug when I was 16 and was without a classic for a couple years and missed owning one, so I got another one. I don't know about you, but hearing stories from others that lived through that era and all the rides they let go, makes me want to keep mine. I also feel that I was born to late, I would have enjoyed that era. This is my time so I choose classic first, newer is secondary. I do not mind working on the car, I get a lot of satisfaction from it. Experience is a plus, too. So if you have any questions regarding the classic stangs, I will answer them to the best of my knowledge.

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And being born in '74 doesn't mean you are too young lol, we're damn near 40 now!!!

 

Not me, I am in denial :hysterical: I don't ever want to grow up :happy feet:

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Good point above about safety of the newer models. There is no comparison.

 

Having lived back in the day I remember how unreliable those old cars were, and the rust....

 

Still I love the old Stangs but if I had one it would be strictly as a weekend / collector vehicle.

 

Oddly enough, my 07 GT has become just that. LOL!

 

 

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^^^ I think you can thank the eleanor craze for some of that '67/'68 value bump... IMO, the 1st gen fastbacks are better looking anyway, especially as an R model :) .... says the guy with a '68 coupe lol

 

Is it me or am I the only one that thinks that real '65-'66 Shelby GT350's are worth more than real '67-'70 Shelby GT 350/500's ,yet '67-'70 recreations sell for a lot more that '65-'66 recreations? By the way, you do not have just any ol' '68 coupe,thats for sure! Your coupe is awesome and I enjoyed seeing the build pics. Thank you again for sharing them.

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Good point above about safety of the newer models. There is no comparison.

 

Having lived back in the day I remember how unreliable those old cars were, and the rust....

 

Still I love the old Stangs but if I had one it would be strictly as a weekend / collector vehicle.

 

Oddly enough, my 07 GT has become just that. LOL!

 

That is true. I feel that, regardless of new or old, defensive driving and not driving like a dumb ass will lower the risk of an accident. Adding safety equipment can, in some ways, be made into a safer vehicle. I noticed under you avatar that you mentioned you have an RV. Do you ever use it as a tow vehicle for your car? Is it a gas or diesel pusher? What kind of fuel mileage do you get when towing? Just curious and wanted to rob the thread :hysterical2:

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Yeah, thanks! but just think what it'd be worth if I did it to a fastback!! of course with higher value, there comes a point at which I'd be scared to actually put it on the track....

 

Don't be scared. Its only a car, and can be fixed. Its like NIKE's motto, JUST DO IT!
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I am married and very happy, so this is just for talking purposes and the fact we are men. I would not treat a hot looking women any different to an average looking women. By the end of the night, they both can give you the same fulfillment, just wrapped in different packages.

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