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Daytona Coupe crash at Laguna Seca


Cali_KR

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I am aware that those cars were built for racing but with its past history should be in a museum and not in a track!!

 

 

I disagree. I feel it should be where the *owner* wants it to be.

 

 

Phill

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Definite ouch, but certainly looks repairable. I'm sure it's seen worse in it's day. That's the thing about these types of race cars, most of them have been lightly or heavily damaged and repaired over time.

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I disagree. I feel it should be where the *owner* wants it to be.

Phill

 

YES!

And that way, people get to see it in action and the owner get to have some fun with it.

If you want to avoid risk, you decide to avoid LIFE and excitement at the same time.

Some old racers have been resurrected from the dead several times during their life, this one will be repaired (once more) and I bet, raced again.

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I'm on the fence on this one. One one hand, I would normally tend to say that cars are ment to be driven. I would not buy a new (or relatively new) car just to have it stand still and collect dust, no matter how rare it is.

 

On the other hand, past a certain age cars like this one become a part of automotive history which in my opinion should be preserved. What if the car was damaged beyond repair? What if this was one of a kind? I view old and rare cars in a way similar to endangered species; you need to preserve them for future generations to enjoy.

 

Having said that, the owner has the right to do what he wants, no matter what others think; it's his money after all.

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I'm on the fence on this one. One one hand, I would normally tend to say that cars are ment to be driven. I would not buy a new (or relatively new) car just to have it stand still and collect dust, no matter how rare it is.

 

On the other hand, past a certain age cars like this one become a part of automotive history which in my opinion should be preserved. What if the car was damaged beyond repair? What if this was one of a kind? I view old and rare cars in a way similar to endangered species; you need to preserve them for future generations to enjoy.

 

Having said that, the owner has the right to do what he wants, no matter what others think; it's his money after all.

 

 

I agree on being really careful with such cars that are pristine original street cars. This is where I have a different view on historic race cars. Yes, there is the chance that it can be damaged beyond repair and that would be horrible, but most of these cars have been wrecked multiple times. Finding a old race car with no previous damage would be pretty unheard of. If it was fixed back in the 60-70's or today, no harm, no foul. Sure when considering a quality street car, prior damage will devistate the value. Race cars, not so much as long as they are repaired correctly. I'm helping a friend restore a recently found '65 GT350R race car out of Peru. Was pretty nicely restored, but the current owner wants it as new with all date correct metal. We are doing some pretty crazy repairs to the frame rails etc, to make it look like there was never any damage, welding in pieces of metal cut out of another '65 rust free Mustang. This will be a crazy massive restoration job. Original roll bar is there, but has had cage welded to it, which needs cut out and grinded down to the original cage. We have located some original NOS door skins etc. to replace metal which was replaced in the past with non original metal.

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There will be no stigma associated with the wreck. If we wreck one of our Shelby GTs or Ford GTs it will show up on carfax and cost you a bundle. Not so with true race cars. This car was probably wrecked more than once in it's history, and each time a world class restorer put it back together to as new or better. In the day, the dents would have been pounded out and it would be on the track the next day. It is one of the wonderful attributes of aluminum.

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wow, I watched that race and thought what is a Superformance car doing out there with all the real cars...doh!

 

In retrospect, I was certainly thrilling to see it in action, the car had more body roll than the roadsters.

 

I did learn over the weekend, from a noted Shelby authority, that CS sold 10 additional serial numbers for Daytona coupes some time in the late 80's / early 90's. I am not sure if any of those were built.

 

This car was at the Rolex last year parked in the paddock (it did not track) next to a very impressive NASCAR type Featherlite rig with matching Prevost tour bus and helicopter. The same guy owned the Scarab that John Morton wadded. He stated over the PA when interviewed "Oh, I was going to restore that anyway"

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Still trying to put all the pieces together from various sources but at least one claims this car was a LeMans winner in 1966 and is owned (and driven) by Robert(?) Walton of Walmart. He owns an original Ferrari 250 and GT40 p1075. More power to him for driving his cars!!!!

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Still trying to put all the pieces together from various sources but at least one claims this car was a LeMans winner in 1966 and is owned (and driven) by Robert(?) Walton of Walmart. He owns an original Ferrari 250 and GT40 p1075. More power to him for driving his cars!!!!

 

 

he drove the wheels of that yellow Ferrari 250LM in the B/P race

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Seems to me if you own such a car and don't drive it as it was intended, you might as well have a good picture of it on your wall; nice visual, but a real waste of a real car.

 

It's probably in the George Washington's hatchet category by now, anyway: it's had the head replaced a dozen times, and the handle a few more, but it's still George Washington's hatchet.

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That is Rob Walton (family owns Wal Mart/Sam's Club) if you notice in some of the pictures that looks like Peter Brock on the outside of the corner with the camera. Peter designed the Cobra Daytona Coupes. Peter may have felt a little pain when it crashed.

 

Yeah, Peter was there

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