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Wheel selection help


duckgumbeaux

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I have a 2011 GT500 SVTPP and want to replace the tires after they wear out with a more touring type tire as I do not plan on tracking the car. After a lot of emails and calls, I am not sure that I can purchase tires to fit these stock rims. I am not opposed to buying a new set of rims but would like some advice on wheel size for the front and rear as well as recommended tires. I like the look of the stock rims and do not care for any chrome or polished aluminum rims. Please let me know where to look for rims that are close to the stock SVTPP rims and the advantages and disadvantages of going to a narrower rear tire or even a smaller diameter.

 

As you can tell, I need a lot of help. I did get smart and leave the Corvette owners after three of them. The GT500 is at least 10 times more fun than my Vettes!

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I'm putting Bridgestone Potenza RE970AS (high performance all-season) on my SVTPP rims. 275/35-20 in the back and 255/40-19 in front. Tires are about 1% smaller in diameter than stock, and 1cm narrower. I expect it will look nearly identical to the Goodyear G:2s. I want to be able to drive in sub-40-degree temperatures without babying it so much. Probably not a problem in Louisiana, though. :-)

 

Today, for example. Sunny outside, roads are clear and dry, temp is about 32F and was 25 when I left for work. >sigh< Had to take the truck.

 

Tires are sitting in my garage; I just have to get an appointment at the local dealer. They've got a Road Force balancer there, and the price isn't bad. I'll post up pics and driving impressions, but it'll probably be a week or two yet.

 

[Edit: corrected comment about diameter change; these tires are smaller, not larger than stock. RPM is higher.]

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I'm putting Bridgestone Potenza RE970AS (high performance all-season) on my SVTPP rims. 275/35-20 in the back and 255/40-19 in front.

 

 

I'm no expert on tires or on fit, but a few years back, I ran Bridgestone Potenzas on another sports car I owned. Best tire I've ever had. Fantastic performance wet and dry. Saved my butt a few times.

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I'm no expert on tires or on fit, but a few years back, I ran Bridgestone Potenzas on another sports car I owned. Best tire I've ever had. Fantastic performance wet and dry. Saved my butt a few times.

 

Good to hear. Based on my research, the RE970's get similar remarks from owners. I'm expecting good results.

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Guys are running Nitto 555, Invo, Continental DWS, etc.

 

Definitely. If all-season isn't a requirement there are many more options available (though none in the exact stock size). I stupidly ordered Hankook Ventus V12's first; didn't even realize they were summer-only until after they were on the UPS truck. :doh:

 

Duckgumbeaux, for what it's worth, my criteria when choosing were 1) all-season and 2) minimal change in diameter, and in the same direction (i.e. both front and rear could be a bit larger, or a bit smaller, but not front bigger/rear smaller or vice versa). I wanted to avoid speedo changes, I wanted the tires to look the same in the wheel wells, and I didn't want to change the posture of the car. I can't upload the spreadsheet I used, but here's a few tires I considered. Many other tires are available in combinations of these sizes, and you might not have the same concerns I did. The Nittos and the DWSs that zimm mentioned are both highly regarded, from what I read.

 

Key

DW = Continental ExtremeContact DW (summer tire)

DWS = Continental ExtremeContact DWS (all-season)

PSAS+ = Michelin Pilot Sport AS+ (all-season)

PS2 = Michelin Pilot Sport PS2 (summer)

Nero = Pirelli PZero Nero AS (all-season)

RE970 = Bridgestone Potenza RE970AS (all-season)

 

Front

OEM - 265/40-19: Only Goodyear G:2s in this size

275/35-19 (-2.9% dia; +1cm width): DW, DWS, PSAS+

275/40-19 (+1.1% dia; +1cm width): DW, DWS, PSAS+, PS2, Nero

255/40-19 (-1.2% dia; -1cm width): DW, PSAS+, PS2, RE970

265/35-19 (-4.0% dia; same width): DW (I did not consider this size due to diameter difference)

255/35-19 (-5.1% dia; -1cm width): DWS (I did not consider this size due to diameter difference)

 

 

Rear

OEM - 285/35-20: Dunlop SP Sport 7010 A/S are available in this size

275/35-20 (-1.0% dia; -1cm width): DW, DWS, PSAS+, Nero, RE970

295/35-20 (+1.0% dia; +1cm width): PS2

275/40-20 (+2.8% dia; -1cm width): DWS

285/30-20 (-4.2% dia; same width): DWS (I did not consider this size due to diameter difference)

295/40-20 (+4.9% dia; +1cm width): DWS (I did not consider this size due to diameter difference)

 

My choices are in red. So front and back are about 1% smaller (+1% RPM, so when odo reads 1,010 miles, I'll have traveled only 1,000 actual miles), and 1cm narrower. I was very interested in the Continental DWSs, but unfortunately I'd have to go with something like 275/40 in the back and I didn't want larger rear/smaller front.

 

It will be much easier for you if summer-only tires are an option. Lots of great choices.

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I thank you Boidster! Really great information and saves me a lot of research. As I am in Louisiana and we do not have really cold weather, I may consider the summer only tires. Not sure about the difference. I have about 6,000 miles on the OEM tires and probably will get about 3-4 more K out of them. I enjoy driving this car more than my Vette and that is why I want to get some different tires that will have more tread wear but keep the aggressive look of the car.

 

I appreciate all the help and if anyone has other knowledge, please let me know.

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Summer-only tires are just limited to warm-weather driving (dry or wet). The stock G:2s, for example, aren't supposed to be driven below 40F, and aren't supposed to be stored below 20F (risk of cracking, I think). I've driven my stock tires down as low as 29F, but they have very limited traction below 50F. Drivable, but I gotta be real careful on onramps and around corners. It hasn't gotten warm enough yet for me to see how they behave at, say, 60 or 70 degrees, but I'm not going to wait. I'm sure they'll be great in our 90+ summers, but the Bridgestones should also do me fine, given that I'm not at the track, and we have too many clear, cold days between November and March for me to keep the car garaged.

 

From what I remember reading, I gathered that other summer-only tires like the Nitto's or the Conti DW's handled very well and were quieter than the G:2s. I (mistakenly) ordered the Hankook Ventus V12s based on good reviews and my prior good experiences with Hankook tires. If I were in a warm climate I would have kept them.

 

If you're shopping online, I've had good experiences with both TireRack and Discount Tires Direct. Either will match the price of the other, and sometimes a size is not available at one or the other. Sometimes it pays to go to the manufacturer's website to see if they make a size you want, even if it's not listed at TireRack or DTD. Also, several people have been able to get the local Ford dealer to price match with online prices, which saves some shipping hassle.

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  • 2 weeks later...

I got the Bridgestone's installed this weekend. Here's the pros/cons list so far:

 

Pros

  • Slightly quieter ride, both rolling noise and over bumps/pavement seams
  • Much better traction in sub-60F temps; the G:2s would stutter and skip at 55F, nevermind 35-40 - the RE970s are solid down to 47F so far; launches can be much more aggressive now
  • Nearly identical side-view; tires are only 0.3 inch smaller in diameter and fill the wheel wells the same as stock tires
  • No speedo adjustments
  • No apparent loss in handling for normal aggressive street driving (i.e. taking 30MPH offramps at 60, turning corners at speed, and so on)

 

Cons

  • Fronts are noticeably narrower on the rims compared to stock. Not a glaring difference, but if you're used to the 265 width G:2s, the 255 width Bridgestones will look different. Rears are not so noticeable.
  • Front wheels will now touch ground when wheel is laid flat; there is no curb-rash protection from the tire in front (dumbass dealer stacked all the newly-mounted tires/wheels on top of eachother, instead of wheel-old tire-wheel-old tire; luckily they didn't add any rash to the wheels)

 

 

So far, I'm happy with the switch, given my driving style. I have to be extra-super-careful around curbs, but then it's not like the G:2s provided much curb protection either. I drove to work today in 47F temps and was pleasantly surprised at how much traction I had. Half-throttle would spin the G:2s at those temps, but the RE970s stayed planted unless I really got on the throttle.

 

The worst thing about the switch was that my F-150 dripped oil all over the dealer's service bay and when I asked them to take a look they said those magic words: "head gasket". :doh: Also "oil pan", "filter mount", and "power steering pump". Good thing the weather is nice so I can drive the GT500 around while they fix the truck and drain my bank account!

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I got the Bridgestone's installed this weekend. Here's the pros/cons list so far:

 

Pros

  • Slightly quieter ride, both rolling noise and over bumps/pavement seams

  • Much better traction in sub-60F temps; the G:2s would stutter and skip at 55F, nevermind 35-40 - the RE970s are solid down to 47F so far; launches can be much more aggressive now

  • Nearly identical side-view; tires are only 0.3 inch smaller in diameter and fill the wheel wells the same as stock tires

  • No speedo adjustments

  • No apparent loss in handling for normal aggressive street driving (i.e. taking 30MPH offramps at 60, turning corners at speed, and so on)

 

Cons

  • Fronts are noticeably narrower on the rims compared to stock. Not a glaring difference, but if you're used to the 265 width G:2s, the 255 width Bridgestones will look different. Rears are not so noticeable.

  • Front wheels will now touch ground when wheel is laid flat; there is no curb-rash protection from the tire in front (dumbass dealer stacked all the newly-mounted tires/wheels on top of eachother, instead of wheel-old tire-wheel-old tire; luckily they didn't add any rash to the wheels)

 

So far, I'm happy with the switch, given my driving style. I have to be extra-super-careful around curbs, but then it's not like the G:2s provided much curb protection either. I drove to work today in 47F temps and was pleasantly surprised at how much traction I had. Half-throttle would spin the G:2s at those temps, but the RE970s stayed planted unless I really got on the throttle.

 

The worst thing about the switch was that my F-150 dripped oil all over the dealer's service bay and when I asked them to take a look they said those magic words: "head gasket". :doh: Also "oil pan", "filter mount", and "power steering pump". Good thing the weather is nice so I can drive the GT500 around while they fix the truck and drain my bank account!

 

 

 

Great review. Sorry to hear about the truck.

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Invos are a great option for a summer-only tire like the G:2s. Since I was specifically shopping for an all-temperature tire, Nittos weren't an option. Now, if/when I get a second set of wheels for summer-only use, Invos will be high on the list.

 

Here are some crappy pictures of the tires.

 

G2s (photo is reversed; this is passenger side): G2_SideView.jpg

Bridgestone RE970ASs: RE970_SideView.jpg

Rear edge view: Rear.jpg

Front edge view: Front.jpg

Front.jpg

G2_SideView.jpg

RE970_SideView.jpg

Rear.jpg

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Invos are a great option for a summer-only tire like the G:2s. Since I was specifically shopping for an all-temperature tire, Nittos weren't an option. Now, if/when I get a second set of wheels for summer-only use, Invos will be high on the list.

 

Here are some crappy pictures of the tires.

 

G2s (photo is reversed; this is passenger side): G2_SideView.jpg

Bridgestone RE970ASs: RE970_SideView.jpg

Rear edge view: Rear.jpg

Front edge view: Front.jpg

 

Thanks for posting the pics.

Fred

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Two additional pros:

  • Less road debris is being kicked up into the rockers, at least to judge by the sound (or lack); if I drive through sand, it still gets kicked up of course, but the G:2s seemed to be finding sand and rocks wherever I went.
  • Mileage has jumped by more than the 1-2% I would expect from decreased tire diameter. It's gone from 14.6 on the G:2s to 16.0 in mixed highway/city driving. I reset the average MPG about 50 miles ago, so perhaps it hasn't settled yet. Also I need to check to make sure the tires aren't overfilled, though I'd expect the dealer to not go much higher than 35 PSI (vs. the 34 listed on the door sill; they didn't have the car so they couldn't read the sill).

 

Also, road noise is definitely reduced. There's a section of freeway on my way to work that has bad concrete seams and on the G:2s I always noticed when I was driving through that area because I had to turn up the radio - ka-thunk ka-thunk ka-thunk ka-thunk. Today I realized I was in that section of road and wasn't hearing the ka-thunking nearly as loudly as before. Softer sidewalls are helping here, I'm sure.

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  • 3 weeks later...

Glad they're working for you. I have no complaints about the switch. Except that the Goodyear F1 G:2s are apparently not worth crap in the aftermarket. They won't sell even at 30% off. Looks like I'll be keeping them as a spare set of tires.

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  • 4 weeks later...

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