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My Brother just bought a 302 Boss ( non Laguna Seca ) for cash ( no trade or financing ). Sorry if I am in the wrong forum but we both own '11 GT 500's also. Anyway we have bought 5 Shelby's from this dealer. My Bro came to my house in it and told me he paid over $50,000 for it. Come to find out the dealer charged him $5,000 over sticker for it without telling him. I had to compare the sticker to the invoice and it did not take much figuring to find out. I would have told the dealer to shove it up his a** but my brother has more money than brains and just shrugged it off. I mean the car is nice but it ain't no GT 500. Bare bones car. The Recaro's make it almost impossible to reach back for the shoulder belt. The bare bones radio has a phone button on it but it never prompted me for bluetooth. Also the 2 keys. It says the dealer has to dealer install the software to change over 200 parameters for the RED key to work. I drove the car and used both keys and I felt absolutely no difference. When I called my dealer buddy ( who is also the sales manager ) he had no idea what I was talking about. He just rattled off that it had been done by Ford. Well why does it say dealer installed software to get the key to work the way it was described???? I guess my point here is my Brother got screwed and the dealer is clueless. What would you guys have done? I told my " dealer buddy " that when the 2013's come out I will be buying elsewhere and he told me " I would never charge you guys over sticker for a Shelby " . I guess I will see. This is exactally how dealers lose long time customers. I am pissed for my Brother on this 302. And no he is not mentally challenged but maybe he needs to go in for a check up! Regards, denohew

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With all due respect, for $50,000 most people would know what, or should know what they were buying. Just saying, the car was worth $50,000 to him at the time he signed the contract. Buyers remorse doesn't count for much. Market price is defined as a willing buyer and a willing seller without outside influence or presure. Sounds like he got the deal he wanted.

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With all due respect, for $50,000 most people would know what, or should know what they were buying. Just saying, the car was worth $50,000 to him at the time he signed the contract. Buyers remorse doesn't count for much. Market price is defined as a willing buyer and a willing seller without outside influence or presure. Sounds like he got the deal he wanted.

 

 

He doesn't have buyers remorse at all, I have ( I have a dumb ass for my brother remorse! ) Also the lack of dealer knowledge ( especially with that ridiculus dealer mark up ) I look at it this way: If you hand me $5000 I will smile and have one hell of a weekend in my Boss. Regards, denohew

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My Brother just bought a 302 Boss ( non Laguna Seca ) for cash ( no trade or financing ). Sorry if I am in the wrong forum but we both own '11 GT 500's also. Anyway we have bought 5 Shelby's from this dealer. My Bro came to my house in it and told me he paid over $50,000 for it. Come to find out the dealer charged him $5,000 over sticker for it without telling him. I had to compare the sticker to the invoice and it did not take much figuring to find out. I would have told the dealer to shove it up his a** but my brother has more money than brains and just shrugged it off. I mean the car is nice but it ain't no GT 500. Bare bones car. The Recaro's make it almost impossible to reach back for the shoulder belt. The bare bones radio has a phone button on it but it never prompted me for bluetooth. Also the 2 keys. It says the dealer has to dealer install the software to change over 200 parameters for the RED key to work. I drove the car and used both keys and I felt absolutely no difference. When I called my dealer buddy ( who is also the sales manager ) he had no idea what I was talking about. He just rattled off that it had been done by Ford. Well why does it say dealer installed software to get the key to work the way it was described???? I guess my point here is my Brother got screwed and the dealer is clueless. What would you guys have done? I told my " dealer buddy " that when the 2013's come out I will be buying elsewhere and he told me " I would never charge you guys over sticker for a Shelby " . I guess I will see. This is exactally how dealers lose long time customers. I am pissed for my Brother on this 302. And no he is not mentally challenged but maybe he needs to go in for a check up! Regards, denohew

 

AS PT BARNUM said almost 100 years ago "Theres a sucker born every minute"--Did your brother buy the snake oil kit too??

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Here's some info on what the "track key" does.

 

2012 MUSTANG BOSS 302 LETS LOOSE WITH TRACKEY; CHOOSE STOCK OR FULL-RACE CALIBRATION

 

• TracKey, available for 2012 Mustang Boss 302 owners through Ford dealers, adds TracMode powertrain control software to the car for track use, providing full race calibration and two-stage launch control in addition to stock calibration, without compromising factory warranty

 

• Using a dual-path powertrain control module (PCM), TracKey software is installed after the vehicle is purchased; accessed by a specially programmed vehicle key, new code coexists with stock Boss software, allowing drivers to choose between street or track use simply by selecting a key

 

• No aftermarket chips or permanent modifications are made when TracKey is used, allowing owners to return to the stock setting by starting the car with a regular key

 

trackey_pic.jpg

You hold two keys: One has a black Boss logo, the other red: Either will start your 2012 Mustang Boss 302. Slide the all-black key into the lock cylinder, give it a twist and you're treated to 444 ponies worth of smooth, streetable driving joy. Or choose red - the TracKey - and you have a competition-ready track car.

 

Boss 302 Forum – You hold two keys: One has a black Boss logo, the other red: Either will start your 2012 Mustang Boss 302. Slide the all-black key into the lock cylinder, give it a twist and you're treated to 444 ponies worth of smooth, streetable driving joy. Or choose red – the TracKey – and you have a competition-ready track car.

 

A joint project between Mustang engineers and Ford Racing, TracKey adds a second set of powertrain control module (PCM) software to a customer's Mustang Boss 302, activated by a specially programmed vehicle key. When invoked by TracKey, the new TracMode software alters more than 200 engine management parameters, increasing low-end torque and turning the potent but well-mannered stock Boss into a competition-ready track car. Remove TracKey and start Boss with the standard key, and all factory engine settings are restored for a comfortable drive home from the course.

 

"From an engine management standpoint, we've done just about everything possible to give TracKey users a full race car experience," explains Jeff Seaman, Mustang powertrain engineer. "It's not for use on the street – for example, the deceleration is set up to preserve the brakes, and the throttle response is very aggressive. A skilled driver on a closed course will really appreciate the benefits."

 

As part of the TracKey software package, Ford engineers also devised a two-stage launch control feature similar to that used on the Cobra Jet race car. Using a combination of steering wheel buttons, drivers can set the tach needle to a desired launch rpm. Floor the throttle and the engine will rev to the preset rpm until the clutch is released, helping aid acceleration and vehicle control from a standing start.

 

One key, hundreds of changes

Devised during an all-night garage brainstorming session among core Mustang team members, TracKey introduces the concept known as the dual-path powertrain control module. The industry-first, patent-pending innovation allows two separate sets of engine management software to exist on a single PCM, selected through the existing SecuriLock® Passive Anti-Theft System (PATS) transceiver found in current production keys.

 

The TracKey PCM software, installed by an authorized Ford dealer after a customer takes delivery of the car, adjusts variable cam timing, spark maps, engine braking, fuel control and other engine parameters – more than 200 in total – to provide a complete race car calibration. The result is an aggressive, race-bred driving experience all the way down to the lopey idle rumbling through the Boss quad exhaust.

 

"Anything that could possibly affect all-out performance is deleted from the TracKey calibration," said Dave Pericak, Mustang chief engineer. "Throttle limiting and torque management – any daily driveability enhancements are removed and replaced with a pure Ford Racing competition calibration."

 

When TracKey is removed and the vehicle is started with the standard key, the PCM settings are automatically drawn from the factory Boss 302 instruction set again without any additional modifications needed – a huge advantage over aftermarket tuning chips and ECU reprogramming. The convenience is useful for enthusiasts who want all-out performance at the racetrack but stock driveability for the journey there and back.

 

An after-hours obsession

In the early stages of TracKey development, a major challenge was the complexity of installing multiple PCM computers and switching between them. However, Ford controls engineers developed a method to choose between two unique sets of software in a single powertrain control module on the Boss 302: The dual-path PCM was born.

 

"We installed the 302R software on the same PCM that held the stock Boss software," says Seaman. "Then the controls engineers developed a software system to activate one or the other, depending upon which key was used to start the vehicle. Really, all the parts to make this work existed – the Ford MyKey® system was already using the PATS transceiver to perform specific actions based on the key used to start the car, and the PCM was flexible enough to handle multiple control modules. It was just putting everything together."

 

As the project unfolded, the team was driven by the uniqueness of what they were trying to accomplish, and TracKey became an obsession. Considering the compressed time frame in which the technology was developed, motivation was essential to the creation of the finished product.

 

"We've all been really excited about TracKey, so it came together quickly," explained Pericak. "The concept was first discussed in spring 2009, and here we are 18 months later with a finished, tested, verified product. It's a perfect example of what can happen when you get a core, cross-functional team willing to contribute 24/7 to bring a great idea to life."

 

TracKey powertrain software installation and key programming will be available to 2012 Mustang Boss 302 owners through Ford Racing authorized dealers. Pricing will be announced at a later date. I love this new Muscle Car competition! I hope Dodge and GM follow suit. When the Camaro exited the market, Ford didn't do much in regards to making the Mustang better in my opinion.

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