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shelby's name - how much is our cars without shelby's name?


sherpa
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just wondering if we didn't have shelby's name/branding/influence, and it was called svt/cobra, would the value stay the same? or lower? or higher?

 

 

 

How much is a 1965 thru 1970 Mustang GT, Mach 1, Boss 302/429 and etc, worth as compared to a 1965 thru 1970 Shelby GT-350/500? The name and lower build numbers will always be worth more.

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How much is a 1965 thru 1970 Mustang GT, Mach 1, Boss 302/429 and etc, worth as compared to a 1965 thru 1970 Shelby GT-350/500? The name and lower build numbers will always be worth more.

 

 

While I agree historically. Not so much with the new builds. I think our cars chould hold more value (especially ones with numbers) then others, but only time will tell if they demand such an big difference.

 

Meanwhile I drive mine, almost like I stole it. :salute:

Edited by jerseygator
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Honestly, at this moment I don't believe there is much of retail/third party value added by the name alone. I would expect these cars to sell at about the same price as if the name wasn't there with the exception of the KR, and GT350 (actually, I'm uncertain about the GT350 and other post-title cars as Shelby is charging a premium for those cars.) The Shelby's from the 60's didn't sell for large sums in the 70's. Now, give these cars 20 or 30 years, we may have a different story.

 

Kelley Blue Book adds ~$1,500 over a GT for an SGT (KBB list the Bullitt for same $ as the SGT) for what ever Kelley Blue Book is worth. Right now, It more likely that because of the Shelby name owners are more likely to better protect and care for their car then a typical Mustang and that will drive retail value more than the name.

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I think in this case it might decrease value simply because people will mostly take care of the shelbys. That will mean there will be more of these cars in decent condition than than the regular mustangs 30 years from now. No one will pay big $$$ for a car if there are still plenty of them all over the place.

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Time will tell. The problem is most of us won't be around to matter by then.

 

I was around and a Mustang guy in the late sixties/early seventies. Shelby’s back then were considered fancy overpriced Mustangs (by those of us who couldn’t afford them). The 65-67’s had a 306 hp 289-4V and the ’67 could be had with a 428-4V but by 1968 thru 1970, the Shelby’s had the same engine as Mustangs and Mach 1’s. The 1968 thru 1970 Shelby GT-350/500’s were usually $1000 to $1500 plus more and heavier because of all the fiberglass add ons and unique Shelby equipment than the same year Mustangs and Mach 1’s. Extra weight meant a lot to hot rodders back then. The drivetrain and chassis were the same.

 

Heck, Shelby (actually Ford by then) couldn’t even sell all the 1969 Shelby’s and re-VIN’ed the leftovers as 1970 models. After 1966 Shelby’s were viewed as “fancy” Mustangs more in line with smaller Thunderbirds/Lincolns than performance cars. In 1973 I looked at a 1966 Shelby GT-350H with a 4-speed for $500. The wheels had been changed out to chromed slotted wheels. The deal breaker for me was it had 60,000 miles. Back then a Hi-Po 289 with that many miles was worn out. In the early 70’s you could buy 1965/66 Mustangs all day long for $400-$600. By the late 70’s prices started climbing. In 1972 my father bought my younger sister a 1965 Mustang convertible for $600. I told him he paid too much. Five years later in 1977, he sold it for $1200 and I thought he sold it for too little then (LOL). It took ten years for the prices to stop dropping and twenty years to double that. If you look at prices of cars from 1965 to 1970 multiply the original price times about five to see what they’d go for today with inflation.

 

Shelby’s will always hold their value more than regular Mustangs for the same years. The 2007 and up Shelby’s should always be worth more than similar year Mustangs due to the drivetrain and chassis setup also as well as lower production numbers compared to the normal Mustang line.

 

Bottom line, enjoy and drive'um. Let the next guy worry about restoration. :shift:

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Time will tell. The problem is most of us won't be around to matter by then.

 

I was around and a Mustang guy in the late sixties/early seventies. Shelby’s back then were considered fancy overpriced Mustangs (by those of us who couldn’t afford them). The 65-67’s had a 306 hp 289-4V and the ’67 could be had with a 428-4V but by 1968 thru 1970, the Shelby’s had the same engine as Mustangs and Mach 1’s. The 1968 thru 1970 Shelby GT-350/500’s were usually $1000 to $1500 plus more and heavier because of all the fiberglass add ons and unique Shelby equipment than the same year Mustangs and Mach 1’s. Extra weight meant a lot to hot rodders back then. The drivetrain and chassis were the same.

 

Heck, Shelby (actually Ford by then) couldn’t even sell all the 1969 Shelby’s and re-VIN’ed the leftovers as 1970 models. After 1966 Shelby’s were viewed as “fancy” Mustangs more in line with smaller Thunderbirds/Lincolns than performance cars. In 1973 I looked at a 1966 Shelby GT-350H with a 4-speed for $500. The wheels had been changed out to chromed slotted wheels. The deal breaker for me was it had 60,000 miles. Back then a Hi-Po 289 with that many miles was worn out. In the early 70’s you could buy 1965/66 Mustangs all day long for $400-$600. By the late 70’s prices started climbing. In 1972 my father bought my younger sister a 1965 Mustang convertible for $600. I told him he paid too much. Five years later in 1977, he sold it for $1200 and I thought he sold it for too little then (LOL). It took ten years for the prices to stop dropping and twenty years to double that. If you look at prices of cars from 1965 to 1970 multiply the original price times about five to see what they’d go for today with inflation.

 

Shelby’s will always hold their value more than regular Mustangs for the same years. The 2007 and up Shelby’s should always be worth more than similar year Mustangs due to the drivetrain and chassis setup also as well as lower production numbers compared to the normal Mustang line.

 

Bottom line, enjoy and drive'um. Let the next guy worry about restoration. :shift:

 

Bill- funny thing about history. I remember the SGT's sitting collecting sunlight and stripe fade in Scottsdale Az. back in '07-'08. I'm willing to bet a hundred bucks that my Scottsdale dealer sold most or all of their 'pile' of SGT's for way less than the SHELBY ADM! Just as back in the day...the average car buyer DID NOT get the whole SGT program.? Shame.

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Bill- funny thing about history. I remember the SGT's sitting collecting sunlight and stripe fade in Scottsdale Az. back in '07-'08. I'm willing to bet a hundred bucks that my Scottsdale dealer sold most or all of their 'pile' of SGT's for way less than the SHELBY ADM! Just as back in the day...the average car buyer DID NOT get the whole SGT program.? Shame.

 

 

One local Ford dealer here in the Bay Area bought three never been titled Grabber Orange SGTs in late 2009 from a defunct Socal Ford dealer. They all stickered at $43,510.00 (Shelby plus MSRP) and they let them go for $33,000.00.

 

I wish I had bought one, but went with the 350.

 

I believe this to be the SGT with the most appreciation potential.

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One local Ford dealer here in the Bay Area bought three never been titled Grabber Orange SGTs in late 2009 from a defunct Socal Ford dealer. They all stickered at $43,510.00 (Shelby plus MSRP) and they let them go for $33,000.00.

 

I wish I had bought one, but went with the 350.

 

I believe this to be the SGT with the most appreciation potential.

 

+1000 Almost bought one @ $33K myself...was gonna have it and the 500 too! Funny thing though MMcGuirk...the SoCal dealer that had it wouldn't let it go to me UNTIL they did the stripe repair. By then, they and I both lost interest. (stripe was faded and water spotted)

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just wondering if we didn't have shelby's name/branding/influence, and it was called svt/cobra, would the value stay the same? or lower? or higher?

 

 

Having Shelby's name and influence involved with the GT500 adds a lot of value to me. I am living a dream having this car, and certainly a part of that dream is having it be a Shelby.

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We drive/desire it because it's the best factory mustang produced to date. We all know SVT created this car, John Colletti to be exact.

 

When the GT600 comes out in 2013 are cars will be devalued along with 03/04 Cobras.

 

Very few people win on an investment on a late model car. I saw an IROC cross BJ auction and it brought 22k, for a car with 300 miles. They paid more then that in 90 when it was made 20 years ago.

 

The muscle cars of the 60/70s are bringing all the money right now. Restored , cloned or modded. So after 40 years a 69 camaro is starting to cost a pretty penny. We can only hope this with our cars but only time will tell.

 

Enjoy and mod them now before gas is $10 a gallon!!

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Time will tell. The problem is most of us won't be around to matter by then.

 

I was around and a Mustang guy in the late sixties/early seventies. Shelby's back then were considered fancy overpriced Mustangs (by those of us who couldn't afford them). The 65-67's had a 306 hp 289-4V and the '67 could be had with a 428-4V but by 1968 thru 1970, the Shelby's had the same engine as Mustangs and Mach 1's. The 1968 thru 1970 Shelby GT-350/500's were usually $1000 to $1500 plus more and heavier because of all the fiberglass add ons and unique Shelby equipment than the same year Mustangs and Mach 1's. Extra weight meant a lot to hot rodders back then. The drivetrain and chassis were the same.

 

Heck, Shelby (actually Ford by then) couldn't even sell all the 1969 Shelby's and re-VIN'ed the leftovers as 1970 models. After 1966 Shelby's were viewed as "fancy" Mustangs more in line with smaller Thunderbirds/Lincolns than performance cars. In 1973 I looked at a 1966 Shelby GT-350H with a 4-speed for $500. The wheels had been changed out to chromed slotted wheels. The deal breaker for me was it had 60,000 miles. Back then a Hi-Po 289 with that many miles was worn out. In the early 70's you could buy 1965/66 Mustangs all day long for $400-$600. By the late 70's prices started climbing. In 1972 my father bought my younger sister a 1965 Mustang convertible for $600. I told him he paid too much. Five years later in 1977, he sold it for $1200 and I thought he sold it for too little then (LOL). It took ten years for the prices to stop dropping and twenty years to double that. If you look at prices of cars from 1965 to 1970 multiply the original price times about five to see what they'd go for today with inflation.

 

Shelby's will always hold their value more than regular Mustangs for the same years. The 2007 and up Shelby's should always be worth more than similar year Mustangs due to the drivetrain and chassis setup also as well as lower production numbers compared to the normal Mustang line.

 

Bottom line, enjoy and drive'um. Let the next guy worry about restoration. :shift:

 

 

 

Bill you sure dated yourself as a member of AARP with this quote. It is amazing how the Mustang and Shelby's have evolved over the years since the mid 60s. We must have both purchased and did a complete read on the Shelby History Book. My first Mustang was a 1966 when I was 17 in highschool. I graduated in 1970.

 

:hysterical::hysterical::hysterical: GG

Edited by TAPD117
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