Jump to content
TEAM SHELBY FORUM

Royal Purple


Recommended Posts

I use Royal purple oil in my car. It is definitely a top of the line motor oil and the only one I prefer to use. American muscle also sells royal purples "purple ice" super-coolant for your radiator. It apparently cools the operating temperature of the motor down by 20 degrees. Any of you guys ever use or hear of this stuff? :headscratch:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

As for the oil, don't think I want to enter that debate again. The good news is that there are a number of excellent choices. As for cooling, there is a breakdown in terms of who must run antifreeze due to hometown ambient temperatures. I live in SoCal and do not have a need for antifreeze. Therefore, I run distilled water and Water Wetter. I have not had a problem with heat on even the hottest days at the track.

 

Jim

Link to comment
Share on other sites

+1 on the Distilled Water. But, doesn't antifreeze raise the boiling point of the water? I know that a coolant system will be under pressure as it heats thus raising the boiling point but I was under the idea that race teams use some high-end coolant that doesn't create a slick spot if spilled and is easy to clean up if spilled.

 

I would be worried about using straight water on a daily driver, even in warmer climates.

 

Having seen Distilled water basically explode when it's super heated and then a contaminate is added would be my ultimate concern.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

+1 on the Royal Purple motor oil. I've used the water wetter and the Ice in my race cars but in my every day drivers living in Wisconsin you never have to worry about it getting too hot.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

 

Feeling better about my decission to go Purple last summer, I have a fresh deliver due today from American Muscle-

 

I use to do valve adjustments on SHO engine's years back and saw some odd wear low mile on Mobile 1 cams

Never trusted the stuff after that- I've been using Valoline Durablend until last summer.

 

=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-

Link to comment
Share on other sites

With regard to distilled water in cooling systems, some serious vintage car owners and stewards were discussing its use in the RacingHistory group on Yahoo!

 

Gordon White is responsible for several aspects of the Smithsonian's auto collection; Dean Butler has a sizable collection of his own.

 

This is all concerned with the storage of racing engines, but I think it's worth posting here; seems to me the subject will eventually come up (if it hasn't been already. My concern for those engines running distilled water is that there is certainly a need to determine if the products that go into the cooling system with the pH7 water sufficiently compensate for its tendency to promote corrosion as it acidifies.

 

Begin quoted material:

 

My point of view is that engines should be stored with the cooling system

full - using medium hard water (what most of us get from our taps at home)

and a corrosion inhibitor correct for the metals that make up the engine.

Prestone brand (and similar) rust inhibitor/water pump lubricant is what I

have generally used. Nalcool (from truck service centers) makes various

versions for engines with and without a lot of non-ferrous alloys.

 

 

 

Whatever you do, never used distilled or de-ionized water in an automotive

cooling system. Medium hard tap water is the least corrosive water.

Distilled water is very corrosive - because, chemically, water wants to be

hard and water without hardness works at finding minerals. Mercedes has

written service bulletins about this over the years.

 

 

 

Also, if you keep the system wet, you are not going to have problems with

any paper seals that might shrink in the absence of water and then start

leaking when you add water.

 

 

 

E. Dean Butler

 

Broughton Green, UK

 

 

 

1c. Re: engine maintenance

Posted by: "edeanbutler" edeanbutler@yahoo.com e.deanbutler

Date: Wed Dec 29, 2010 5:25 am ((PST))

 

Gordon and other engine preservers:

 

 

 

Is the National Air & Space Museum manual something which could be put onto

the internet? Is possible for any of us to obtain a copy? It sounds like

interesting and instructive reading.

 

 

 

With regard to pH (written with a little p big H): this is a scale from 1 to

14. Distilled water is 7.0. Anything lower is acidic. Anything higher is

"basic" (like sodium hydroxide). The scale is logarithmic. Thus 6 is ten

times as acidic as distilled water, 9 is 100 times as acidic - like the

Richter scale for earthquakes. It will be interesting to see what the NA&SM

manual recommends, but I bet it is in the 7.5-7.7 range - the general

recommendation to prevent acidic conditions causing problems, yet below the

point where there are problems from being too basic. Also, if you start at

7.0, the coolant is likely to slowly become slightly acidic - so it is best

to start with a slightly basic coolant.

 

 

 

You can use household swimming pool pH strips or liquid reagents to measure

PH!

 

 

 

E. Dean Butler

 

Broughton Green, UK

 

 

 

From: RacingHistory@yahoogroups.com [mailto:RacingHistory@yahoogroups.com]

On Behalf Of gordon

Sent: 29 December 2010 12:10

To: RacingHistory@yahoogroups.com

Subject: [RH] engine maintenance

 

 

 

 

 

The Smithsonian's National Air & Space Museum has a manual for maintenance

of reciprocating aircraft engines, taken, I think, from the Air Force. I

have a copy here somewhere. We at American History try to follow that.

Aircraft engines, radial or in-line, are quite similar to racing engines, so

probably the USAF manual is a good scientific guide. As I recall the idea is

to maintain the coolant as some specified Ph. They recommend spraying light

oil into the intake while the engine is running until it stalls. You have to

be careful not to get enough liquid oil into the cylinders to "hydraulic"

them. I doubt either Air & Space or American History does all the repetitive

maintenance we should, because of lack of personnel at the Garber Facility.

I do what I can.

Gordon White, Hardyville, VA

 

End quoted material

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I use Royal purple oil in my car. It is definitely a top of the line motor oil and the only one I prefer to use. American muscle also sells royal purples "purple ice" super-coolant for your radiator. It apparently cools the operating temperature of the motor down by 20 degrees. Any of you guys ever use or hear of this stuff? :headscratch:

 

are you kidding,nothing but Royal 283351-R1-26-25A.jpg :salute:

283351-R1-26-25A.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Interesting read, however, my concern with using tap water or Hard Water is not pH level and the likelyhood for corrosion, particulary when the water is circulated and the block/heads are aluminum. My concern deals with minera deposits (calcium and magnesium) on the surfaces of the coolant passageways within the block and rad.

 

The mineral deposits will reduce coolant flow stressing the entire system and will reduce the effectiveness of the system as the deposits do not conduct heat efficently. Basically, it will insulate the block from the coolent.

 

It sounds like adding a corrosion inhibitor to Distilled water is the ideal solution if antifreeze is not used. I assume this would also address my concern (which may be silly to begin with) with super heated Distilled water.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I know people all have their personal oil preferences and I respect that. I can only speak from my experience having used a variety of motor oils in a number of different cars and trucks. As of now, I only use Royal Purple in all of my vehicles, from the Terlingua to our Ford diesel truck. I like the company and their products so much, I actively pursued them as a sponsor for my Terlingua and I'm happy to report they are one of my biggest sponsors. At Terlingua this past year, I had a major over heating problem during the "all out speed" event. The folks at Royal Purple recommended I use the Purple Ice in both the radiator and the supercharger cooling system along with their racing oil for the engine. Since then, I have seen a noticeable reduction in the cars operating temperature, and sure wish I had it in during the Terlingua event. Royal Purple sells nothing but top notch products and I highly recommend them.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Distilled or deionized water should be used for ethylene glycol solutions. City tap water may be treated with chlorine which is corrosive.

 

 

Distilled or deionized water should not be used alone, as it will strip away mineral content from the engine system.

 

 

You best solution is a combination of 50/50, 60/40 or 40/60 along with RP Purple Ice or RedLine Wetter Water.

your favorite ethlene glycol solution, ie Prestone. with Distilled or deionized water.

60/40 colder climates

40/60 ambient to warmer climates

30/70 for warmer to hotter climates

NOTE: EG (ETHYLENE GLYCOL - MOST COMMON PRODUCT) DOES LITTLE TO RAISE BOILING POINTS! THE CHART SHOWS A 15PSI PRESSURE CAP WHICH ACCOUNTS FOR 3 degrees per PSI SO NOTICE THAT THE PRODUCT ITSELF IS ONLY WORTH 8 degrees IN INCREASED BOILING POINT OVER THE KNOWN 212F AT SEA LEVEL.

 

NOTE II: ANTI-FREEZE (EG) IS A LOUSY COOLANT IN THAT IT DOES NOT TRANSFER HEAT AS WELL AS WATER ALONE BUT IS CRITICAL FOR ANTI-CORROSION PROPERTIES AND MORE IN HOT WEATHER. MORE THAN A 50/50 MIX IS NOT RECOMMENDED FOR THE VAST MAJORITY OF PEOPLE AND PLACES THEY WOULD LIKELY BE.

Must read:

http://www.superstreetonline.com/techarticles/61718_cooling_systems/index.html

Good reads:

http://www.newton.dep.anl.gov/askasci/chem03/chem03987.htm

http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_qa3828/is_200308/ai_n9294683/?tag=content;col1

 

For High Performance HP & Hot weather applications, I would consider: EVANS NPG & NPG+ COOLANT

http://www.lubricationspecialist.com/front/showcontent.aspx?fileid=21

 

http://www.evanscooling.com/npg/

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

+1 on the Distilled Water. But, doesn't antifreeze raise the boiling point of the water? I know that a coolant system will be under pressure as it heats thus raising the boiling point but I was under the idea that race teams use some high-end coolant that doesn't create a slick spot if spilled and is easy to clean up if spilled.

 

I would be worried about using straight water on a daily driver, even in warmer climates.

 

Having seen Distilled water basically explode when it's super heated and then a contaminate is added would be my ultimate concern.

 

I do have a cup (as in 8 oz) of anti-freeze in my mix (I did not see that as relevant until the later posts in this topic). In my experience, that is enough to combat any issues that are perceived to exist with straight distilled water and Water Wetter. In the end, like everything else, you should run what makes you comfortable.

 

Jim

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

×
×
  • Create New...
...