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Push Started the Shelby yesterday


relopez98

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Winter settling in here in Dallas. Been taking out the Shelby about once a week for short trips or 20 min to work on nice days. Noticing that it is harder to start some cold mornings. Usually the return trip is fine, after I've kept the rpms high enough to recharge the battery.

 

Yesterday was a different story! Went about 5 minuts to the gas station, filled her up while wife was messing with the radio. The Shelby refusted to turn over after that point...AND MY BUFFALO WILD WINGS WERE WAITING TO BE PICKED UP.

 

We called for a jump, but that was a ways off and no one at the station had any. I remembered my youth and said...we'll push start it.

 

It worked like a charm...short push (with the wife's help), dumped the clutch and she started right up. Kept her on and drove like a jack ass all the way to wings and home.

 

Got her home, changed the oil and air filter for the winter and put her to bed.

 

Now, where to go for a new battery.

 

Current one is stock and its about 4.5 years old now.

 

Any suggestions on where/which one/how much.

 

Thanks,

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Winter settling in here in Dallas. Been taking out the Shelby about once a week for short trips or 20 min to work on nice days. Noticing that it is harder to start some cold mornings. Usually the return trip is fine, after I've kept the rpms high enough to recharge the battery.

 

Yesterday was a different story! Went about 5 minuts to the gas station, filled her up while wife was messing with the radio. The Shelby refusted to turn over after that point...AND MY BUFFALO WILD WINGS WERE WAITING TO BE PICKED UP.

 

We called for a jump, but that was a ways off and no one at the station had any. I remembered my youth and said...we'll push start it.

 

It worked like a charm...short push (with the wife's help), dumped the clutch and she started right up. Kept her on and drove like a jack ass all the way to wings and home.

 

Got her home, changed the oil and air filter for the winter and put her to bed.

 

Now, where to go for a new battery.

 

Current one is stock and its about 4.5 years old now.

 

Any suggestions on where/which one/how much.

 

Thanks,

 

 

Interstate Megatron has been the best battery I have ever owned. I've had one in my Porsche for seven years now, dealing with the Arizona summers combined with underhood turbo temperatures.

 

Please DO NOT spend the money on a fancy (OPTIMA) battery!!! Myself and several others have learned the hard way and are now back to using a "good" conventional battery. Some Optimas work flawlessly...some make good doorstops...it truly is a crapshoot. Pay half the money now and buy a Megatron...then, in eight years, spend the other half on another Megatron.

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Interstate Megatron has been the best battery I have ever owned. I've had one in my Porsche for seven years now, dealing with the Arizona summers combined with underhood turbo temperatures.

 

Please DO NOT spend the money on a fancy (OPTIMA) battery!!! Myself and several others have learned the hard way and are now back to using a "good" conventional battery. Some Optimas work flawlessly...some make good doorstops...it truly is a crapshoot. Pay half the money now and buy a Megatron...then, in eight years, spend the other half on another Megatron.

 

 

Thanks, I'll keep that in mind when shopping.

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Interstate Megatron has been the best battery I have ever owned. I've had one in my Porsche for seven years now, dealing with the Arizona summers combined with underhood turbo temperatures.

 

Please DO NOT spend the money on a fancy (OPTIMA) battery!!! Myself and several others have learned the hard way and are now back to using a "good" conventional battery. Some Optimas work flawlessly...some make good doorstops...it truly is a crapshoot. Pay half the money now and buy a Megatron...then, in eight years, spend the other half on another Megatron.

 

 

Do you know how much a Megatron will set you back, ballpark?

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I remembered my youth and said...we'll push start it.

 

It worked like a charm...short push (with the wife's help), dumped the clutch and she started right up.

 

 

Reminds me of "push starting" a British-spec Volvo (blown starter) for a week in the German/Austrian Alps during a ski trip! Parts/labor for a British-spec starter was twice as expensive in Germany than in England!

 

Made sure I parked facing downhill everywhere I went... Even managed to get on/off the English Channel Ferry boat via a bump start. Wife was very helpful, understanding, and knew how to drive a stick shift!

 

On the battery note... had to charge my battery on Christmas day with my new charger, seems I left map light on after putting the cover on. Battery took the full charge and seems to be operating normally now.

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Just had my battery replaced under warranty....it's a Motorcraft special, but I 'spect it'll do a while. My 05 SuperCrew still has original battery and my '00 conversion van still had it's original until about a year ago.......Had a couple of interstates on previous cars & work vans. When I traded them I moved the batteries--until I bought much newer vehicles.

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Make sure you get a battery tender , each time you let your battery go dead it kills 10 per cent life of your battery

 

 

+1 on the Batt Tender

I have one car and two motorcycles that don't get driven regularly so all three have a full time Battery Tender, Jr on them. M/C batteries have a reputation for going out in about three years; the Honda lasted 7 yrs and the Harley lasted 5.5 yrs. The T-Bird has the OEM batt and is 5.5 yrs and running. :shift:

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If you want a gel battery try the diehard patinum series. lot better than Optima, and are available in ford sizes. they are pretty pricey though, 150.00 to 200.00 each.

 

 

I tried that but there is not a Mustang cross reference in the Sears battery guide. I did not drive the car there and since I did not want to "guess" which battery would fit.

I bought a Yellow Top Optima and things have been great so far...

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Thanks everyone. The weather has been cooperative and I haven't had any trouble lately. Took her out and drove her for a while, keeping the revs high. That seemed to do the trick. Once I know that we're getting an extended set of bad weather, I'll get a tender and hook her up.

 

Planning on removing the rusty butt at that time too.

 

Mother in law is still in town for the next month, so this all looks like a February project.

 

Thanks again for the support and assistance.

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Noticed the post on alternator. Though some may not suggest on our prized vehicles. A quick trick I learned many years ago, while vehicle is running, simply remove your positive lead on your battery. If the vehicle stays running, your alternator is charging. If the motor quits, your system is not charging and best indicator of bad alternator. Of course the lack of belts not slipping/squeeling would be obvious. Keep in mind, all your radio settings etc. may need to be reset. Hope you enjoy the new year.

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Just curious, :headscratch: or maybe I ain't to smart. How did you get around the clutch switch that requires the clutch to be fully depressed to start the engine????? :headscratch:

 

 

That's a good one; dunno?

 

When it stalled I was at a gas station. The wife and I pushed it a little bit towards a decline to enter the road. Once it was going about 1-2 mph, I hopped back in the driver's seat, put it in first, dropped the clutch at the same time I turned the ignition.

 

It started right up.

 

I had to quickly avoid a Miata that was entering where I was exiting...not something I want to ever repeat.

 

Once it was going, I put the clutch back in, put it in neutral, and kept the revs up enough to keep it going.

 

I've had 4 other manuals growing up, all needed the clutch engaged to start, and I've had to push start all of them at some point over their life spans. I never really thought about it, but you raise a very good point.

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Just curious, :headscratch: or maybe I ain't to smart. How did you get around the clutch switch that requires the clutch to be fully depressed to start the engine????? :headscratch:

 

 

It doesn't prevent the engine from starting, it prevents the starter from turning.

 

It's just a simple starter cut-out switch so the engine will still start but the starter will not spin/engage.

 

 

Phill

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+1 on the Batt Tender

I have one car and two motorcycles that don't get driven regularly so all three have a full time Battery Tender, Jr on them. M/C batteries have a reputation for going out in about three years; the Honda lasted 7 yrs and the Harley lasted 5.5 yrs. The T-Bird has the OEM batt and is 5.5 yrs and running. :shift:

 

 

+2

 

Even with a new one, Battery Tender :yup:

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Noticed the post on alternator. Though some may not suggest on our prized vehicles. A quick trick I learned many years ago, while vehicle is running, simply remove your positive lead on your battery. If the vehicle stays running, your alternator is charging. If the motor quits, your system is not charging and best indicator of bad alternator.

 

 

Never ever EVER do this on a modern day computer controlled vehicle.

 

The reason that works is because the battery is just there to "store" electricity to enable you to start the car and/or use the accessories when the engine is not turning the alternator. Once the engine starts, the alternator is replacing the power you used from the battery AND powering the accessories (including the Electronic Engine Control/EEC computer, better known as the Powertrain Control Module or "PCM".

 

The problem is, the alternator output voltage is determined by the Voltage Regulator. If it senses low voltage, it makes the alternator put out more voltage (and in turn, more amperage as votage and amperage are directly proportional).

 

So when you disconnect your battey cable, the voltage regulator senses NO (i.e. ZERO) volts and attempts to force the alternator to produce maximum voltage (approx 16.7-17.5 volts) and whatever amperage the alternator is rated at. If you have a 300 amp alternator, it will produce up to 300 amps of current.

 

And hence, the problem with computer controlled cars. A diode and/or transistor has a bias voltage threshold. That is, it's a "one-way" valve until you surpass the voltage threshold which is about 16 volts (realisticaly, .750 amps or 750 milliamps). 16.7 volts WILL surpass the 750ma rating of any diode/transistor out there so you will more than likely destroy your EEC/PCM if you allow your alternator to power it up at max output.

 

This is how serious this can get: I had a early 90's Corvette come in to my shop with a dead battery. We charged the battery, tested it and it was good. We tried to start the car with the recharged battery and it would not start. We pulled the alternator and sent it to our alternator shop to be tested and the diode trio was burned out. We replaced the alternator and the car still would not start. To make a long story short, EVERY SINGLE ELECTRONIC device in the car was toast. The PCM, the TCS module, the Digital Dash, the alternator, etc. etc. etc. In this case, it was because someone connected a set of battery jumper cables on using reverse polarity. The battery was dead because a battery cable connection became disconnected. The reverse polarity burned out the diodes in the alternator...the disconnected cable burned out all of the other electronic devices in the car.

 

You might get away with it once....or maybe even if you just disconnect it for a fraction of a second (so the alt. voltage never actually reaches full output), but it's that ONE TIME that will end up costing you a FORTUNE. And I assure you that your warranty WILL NOT COVER it (as it is customer induced).

 

Please, please, PLEASE, do not EVER use this method on a modern vehicle. Pre-computer control cars are no problem because there are no semi-conductors to fry. Computer controlled cars are a totally different story.

 

I use this analogy: It's like running over broken glass. We've all done it at some point in our driving careers, and we've all got away with it (no flats) but I'll bet you a cup of coffee that there isn't ONE person on this forum that will go outside and intentionally run over some broken glass to prove that it won't puncture your tire/s again.

 

Sometimes you're the windshield....sometimes you're the bug (or tree/dog).

 

 

Phill

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