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Tires Cupping after 2k mi.


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Like the title says. I know I need to get the camber bolt put on and re-aligned but the tires shouldn't be cupping if it's a camber problem would it? I was think more wear to the inside of the tire but cupping? I guess I should take a closer look at it but I just happen to take a quick glance at the tires as I was walking away with the wheel all the way turned to one side. Any insight would much be appreciated. I don't plan on driving much until I find a cure.

 

By the way, I am running 19's on the SGT. 8.5 front and 9.5 rears if it makes any difference, which I doubt.

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Like the title says. I know I need to get the camber bolt put on and re-aligned but the tires shouldn't be cupping if it's a camber problem would it? I was think more wear to the inside of the tire but cupping? I guess I should take a closer look at it but I just happen to take a quick glance at the tires as I was walking away with the wheel all the way turned to one side. Any insight would much be appreciated. I don't plan on driving much until I find a cure.

 

By the way, I am running 19's on the SGT. 8.5 front and 9.5 rears if it makes any difference, which I doubt.

 

 

Generally, tire cupping is caused by worn out shock absorbers and not necessarly related to caster or camber problems per se. The tires bounce along the highway, and the up and down (skipping) contact with the road causes the tread/tire to scallop or cup if you will. Are you certain that you are seeing cupping? Are you detecting vibration in your steering wheel? Out of balance tires can also be a cause of tire cupping too.

Edited by Son of GT
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I agree...cupping (uneven wear on various areas of the tire) typically indicates shock absorber problems from what I always read & heard.

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I've seen something that could be taken for "cupping" that was generated by lots and lots of hard cornering, especially if the car has significant understeer (pushing, "tight"). the sides of the tread blocks get worn off and the forward-motion wear doesn't keep up with it, so there is a big difference between highest and less-high wear on the tread blocks.

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Generally, tire cupping is caused by worn out shock absorbers and not necessarly related to caster or camber problems per se. The tires bounce along the highway, and the up and down (skipping) contact with the road causes the tread/tire to scallop or cup if you will. Are you certain that you are seeing cupping? Are you detecting vibration in your steering wheel? Out of balance tires can also be a cause of tire cupping too.

 

Correct. I didn't think about that. My tires are out of balance and I've meant to get that re-balanced but was waiting until I went ahead with camber bolts and alignment. I knew that. I definately was not thinking right. Yes my steering does vibrate at higher speeds.

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Like the title says. I know I need to get the camber bolt put on and re-aligned but the tires shouldn't be cupping if it's a camber problem would it? I was think more wear to the inside of the tire but cupping? I guess I should take a closer look at it but I just happen to take a quick glance at the tires as I was walking away with the wheel all the way turned to one side. Any insight would much be appreciated. I don't plan on driving much until I find a cure.

 

By the way, I am running 19's on the SGT. 8.5 front and 9.5 rears if it makes any difference, which I doubt.

 

 

Also what are you running on tire pressure to much also will cause the tires to bounce to much. I use to do it to my police car so when you hit the street corners you can do a drift. Since are chevy's and fords ran on the crappy gas.

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Running 40 psi up front. Although I should re-check again since I hardly ever drive it.

 

Here you go !!!

 

 

Cupping, or "scalloping" of the tires on a vehicle is a primary concern for any driver. Cupping is when a vehicle's tires are exposed to more wear and tear than normal in one of a variety of ways. Cupping can be resultant of a repair issue or from low quality tires and needs to be recognized for the hazardous condition it is.

 

What Is Cupping?

Cupping is when a vehicle's tires have indentations in them. Cupping is caused by worse than normal wear, tear and pressure on the surface of the tire that takes small pieces and sections of the tires surface off. The remaining spots are smoothed during driving so they're called "cupping" as opposed to "chipping." Cupping may be referred to by some professionals as "scalloping."

 

Driving on tires that are cupping is not a safe scenario for drivers since there is less contact between the surface of the tire and that of the road. Less contact means less traction and control for starting and stopping.

What Causes Cupping in Tires?

The majority of cases of cupping happens in inexpensive low-quality tires. Higher quality tires are better able to resist chipping by the environment that causes cupping in cheaper tires. Consumers should have high quality tires installed on their vehicles.

Another Cause of Cupping

Even if the tires are higher quality, and cupping still occurs, the problem might be with an errant suspension on the vehicle. If the suspension on a vehicle allows for the tires to bounce, as the vehicle rolls along, the extra action will make scuff marks on the tires, resulting in cupping.

 

Unfortunately, when the cause is the suspension, a qualified mechanic must replace the suspension and the tires. Since there's a risk of the cause being a serious repair like suspension, having a mechanic check the vehicle is often worth the expense, in spite of the time it will take.

Odd Cupping Situations

If the tires experiencing cupping are on the rear only, the cause of the problem may just be with the vehicle's alignment. Fortunately, in such cases, purchasing new tires and an alignment adjustment is more economical than replacing suspension and tires. If in doubt as to the condition your tires, take your vehicle to a qualified mechanic.

Two Easy Ways to Note a Problem With Your Tires

Look for indentations and an uneven surface that resembles "scallops" in the tread of the tire, where a driver should expect to see a smooth surface. You also might notice a slight rumbling sound as the vehicle moves. This sound most likely comes from the cupped spots on the tires. If either of these situations are noticed, take your vehicle to a trained mechanic.

 

 

Read more: The Causes of Cupping Tires | eHow.com http://www.ehow.com/about_5509983_causes-cupping-tires.html#ixzz0tWQCGODO

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