Jump to content
TEAM SHELBY FORUM

Another big earthquake?


Recommended Posts

If sure seems that there are an increasing number of big earthquakes in the past few years. In particular what struck me this time is that within minutes of the 7.2 in the very southern part of California/Baja another 4. something hits northern California.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

If sure seems that there are an increasing number of big earthquakes in the past few years. In particular what struck me this time is that within minutes of the 7.2 in the very southern part of California/Baja another 4. something hits northern California.

 

 

Few Years.....try Few MONTHS. In the last couple of Months, California has had several biggies.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

There is not much that can be gleaned from the earthquake events of yesterday. I was born here in San Diego and have been through them all (60 years worth) and have been in a car, in a high rise and, yesterday, in the lobby of my local shooting range, when they struck. Each is different and yesterday's was what is termed a rolling quake -- kind of like an undulation rather than the spookier type that presents itself with hard jolts. We are way over due for a major quake. These recent quakes could have eased the stress or be the first of many to come. Bottom line, we just do not know that much about predicting quakes. In California, our building codes are strict and that helps. I rode out a major quake on the 20th floor of an office building and I can tell you that, while it is scary with the amount the building moved, there was no damage to the building. Quakes are part of the landscape here. Others have hurricanes, floods and the like. Wasn't the biggest quake in US history in Missouri?

 

Jim

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Few Years.....try Few MONTHS. In the last couple of Months, California has had several biggies.

 

 

Well, I guess it all depends on what you call a "biggie" We haven't had one in the 7 range sense 1992. But, then again a 6 under your feet sure feels like a "biggie" :hysterical: I was in the Big Bear quake which was the same day as the Landers quake. Landers was about 30 miles away and was a 7.3. It sure woke me up and got everyone in town out of bed :hysterical: . The Big Bear quake was, I believe, a 6.5 that was right under the town. It caused a lot of damage and felt much harder than the bigger Landers quake. So, I would say that "biggie" is a real relative term.

 

 

There is not much that can be gleaned from the earthquake events of yesterday. I was born here in San Diego and have been through them all (60 years worth) and have been in a car, in a high rise and, yesterday, in the lobby of my local shooting range, when they struck. Each is different and yesterday's was what is termed a rolling quake -- kind of like an undulation rather than the spookier type that presents itself with hard jolts. We are way over due for a major quake. These recent quakes could have eased the stress or be the first of many to come. Bottom line, we just do not know that much about predicting quakes. In California, our building codes are strict and that helps. I rode out a major quake on the 20th floor of an office building and I can tell you that, while it is scary with the amount the building moved, there was no damage to the building. Quakes are part of the landscape here. Others have hurricanes, floods and the like. Wasn't the biggest quake in US history in Missouri?

 

Jim

 

 

Yep, well said. I've been in tornado's, a hurricane, two typhoons, and numerous earthquakes.... I'll take the earthquake... Again I guess a "biggie" is relative to what you are used to... Yesterdays felt as if I was on the ocean...a real strong roller, that told me that it was a biggie, but it was a good distance away

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

 

Yep, well said. I've been in tornado's, a hurricane, two typhoons, and numerous earthquakes.... I'll take the earthquake... Again I guess a "biggie" is relative to what you are used to... Yesterdays felt as if I was on the ocean...a real strong roller, that told me that it was a biggie, but it was a good distance away

 

 

Remind me not to go on vacation with you :hysterical:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have to agree with Jim, I would rather have the 7.2 roller than a shaker. We were out walking the dog and heard fences rattle but not much more till we got home and my daughter asked how we liked the earth quake? Some stuff fell but nothing compared to the shaker last year. I'll still take our earthquakes over hurricanes and tornados.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Well, I guess it all depends on what you call a "biggie" We haven't had one in the 7 range sense 1992. But, then again a 6 under your feet sure feels like a "biggie" :hysterical: I was in the Big Bear quake which was the same day as the Landers quake. Landers was about 30 miles away and was a 7.3. It sure woke me up and got everyone in town out of bed :hysterical: . The Big Bear quake was, I believe, a 6.5 that was right under the town. It caused a lot of damage and felt much harder than the bigger Landers quake. So, I would say that "biggie" is a real relative term.

 

Yep, well said. I've been in tornado's, a hurricane, two typhoons, and numerous earthquakes.... I'll take the earthquake... Again I guess a "biggie" is relative to what you are used to... Yesterdays felt as if I was on the ocean...a real strong roller, that told me that it was a biggie, but it was a good distance away

 

 

It is amazing to realize the power of a strong earthquake.........I was in an open parking lot in the 92 quake approx 20 miles

from the epicenter and could easily notice the the ripples like waves from the asphalt........An earthquake is accurately

compared to the reaction of a rock dropped in water............We were real close to the epicenter of the Whittier Narrows

quake of 87 and had extensive damage to the house.........Rock and Roll is okay but you never wan't to ride the Jack Hammer........

 

At least the other powers of nature you mentioned come with some warning?????????

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I was watching HGTV "Flip this House" and while filming, there was an Earthquake. It sounded like a low but loud rumble and the ground was shaking and the guys working on the house were freaking out, a few fell. It lasted about 20 seconds and the foundation had several major Cracks as well and the Sheet rock. That was the first one I ever witnessed. I have seen them on TV Shows (Sit-Coms) but you know they faked it. Not sure how I would react if I was actually there.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

WOW......Has anyone else noticed that when California has an Earthquake with in 24 to 48 Hours another one happens somewhere in another Country just as bad?

 

http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/as_indonesia_earthquake

Link to comment
Share on other sites

WOW......Has anyone else noticed that when California has an Earthquake with in 24 to 48 Hours another one happens somewhere in another Country just as bad?

 

http://news.yahoo.co...esia_earthquake

 

:yup:

 

My son is over in Indonesia. We are still awaiting word from him to make sure he's alright.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

There are limits to the current Richter scale just as the current Saffir-Simpson for hurricanes has some draw-backs. The USGS computes a shake index map to help alleviate some of the shortcomings in the Richter scale. The Richter scale as it is currently defined, describes the amount of energy released at the epicenter. If the epicenter is deep and the intervening earth absorbs a lot of the energy, the energy felt at the surface will be less than say an earthquake with a lower Richter number but a shallower epicenter and very transmissive rocks between the epicenter and the surface.

 

The "rolling" versus "shaking" is caused by the two main wave varieties generated by the earthquake - compressional or P waves and shear or S waves. P waves travel faster usually so if you are close to the epicenter, you feel an initial jolt caused by the compressional wave followed by more intense shaking as the shear waves roll through. Predicting the movements can be very tricky however, because the energy can transfer between the P waves and the S waves at all of the layer interfaces in the earth. WE call that mode conversion. In addition, the earth tends to filter the frequency content toward the longer wavelengths with distance from the epicenter so the motion at the surface becomes more regular and less chaotic.

 

The only earthquake I have ever felt was the Mexico City earthquake while I was in Houston. I was on the 31st floor of a building and the p waves made it feel like someone hit the floor with a big hammer. The venetian blinds then slowly rocked for less than a minute.

 

I was in L.A. for a 5.9 aftershock of the Northridge earthquake but I was riding the Swiss Gondola ride at Disney with my children and the only way I knew there had been an aftershock was that the ride stopped.

 

Here's a link to the USGS site:

 

http://earthquake.usgs.gov/earthquakes/

Edited by moabman
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thank God Dan, I was praying you and Marji would get good news soon. :happy feet:

 

 

Thanks Michael. Marji always says "you are a tough man, with a big the heart". Smart gal that one.

 

 

Hugs to Dale for us.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...
...