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Oil Separators or Catch Cans


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I've received a couple emails regarding oil separators which I mentioned in another thread and some of the members here were interested in the Conceptual Polymer oil separators. These are very high quality custom made oil separators which you can read about, and order, here:

 

http://www.conceptua.../new_page_1.htm

 

Dave, the owner of Conceptual Polymers, also has a PDF explaining how oil separators work, which can be viewed here:

 

http://www.conceptua...Removal 102.pdf

 

The catch cans can be ordered here:

 

http://www.conceptualpolymer.com/new_page_1.htm

 

I purchased the glass oil separator and completed the install without a hitch, except that I needed to make my own bracket since I didn't want to drill any holes in the strut tower. The bracket wasn't that hard to make and is rather simple.

 

On the SGT's and GT/SC's, the oil separator needs to be installed on the driver's side cam/valve cover. The oil separator needs to be installed in the PCV hose - between the PCV valve and the fitting where the hose goes into the throttle body. The PCV valve is located at the front of the cam/valve cover. The PCV hose is 5/8" hose which I chose to replace with a 1/2" fuel line hose. It was tight getting it to fit, but if you work it, oil it, it will slip on with a little muscle. I also enlarged the internal ends of the new 1/2" hose with my die grinder - which definitely helped fitment. The brass barbed fittings on the end of the oil separator are 1/2" so there was no problem with the hose fitting at the separator. If you choose, you could install a larger fitting at the oil separator (5/8") but I felt the 1/2" size is plenty large.

 

Below are a few pics of the install. The numbers on the photos indicate the following:

 

1 - PCV valve

2 - Throttle body fitting

3 - Bracket attachment point on a strut bolt

4 - PCV hose

S - Oil Separator

 

The first photo indicates where everything is located before the install. The next group of photos show my fabricated bracket, and the bracket attached to the oil separator. (The finished install will be continued below.)

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Attached below are pics of the completed oil separator install. If you choose to use the Conceptual Polymer oil separator, the PCV valve hose should connect to the side of the oil separator with the " Vac C" marking and the hose going to the throttle body should connect to the side marked with the "Vac P." The yellow dots on the PCV valve indicates how the hoses are routed.

 

You won't catch as much oil with non-supercharged cars, but if you're running it hard, the last thing you need is all this extra oil being sucked back into the intake system through your PCV hose and gumming and coating everything inside your engine.

 

The numbers on the photos indicate the following:

 

1 - PCV valve

2 - Throttle body fitting

3 - Bracket attachment point on a strut bolt

4 - PCV hose

S - Oil Separator

 

Good luck.

John

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These have to be drained regularly, is that correct? Is that easy to do? If I'm looking at your pic correctly, it appears that the little glass bottle just needs to be unscrewed?

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These have to be drained regularly, is that correct? Is that easy to do? If I'm looking at your pic correctly, it appears that the little glass bottle just needs to be unscrewed?

 

 

Yes they are drained regularly - but I'd guess at least every couple thousand miles based on my driving habits. It is based on how much and how hard you drive the car. I'll post some pics later as mine fills. But, as little as I get to drive the car lately, it might be a while. The catch can depicted here unscrews from the machined top and the contents of the jar can be disposed of in your neighbors Camaro or other appropriate place. :hysterical:

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Yes they are drained regularly - but I'd guess at least every couple thousand miles based on my driving habits. It is based on how much and how hard you drive the car. I'll post some pics later as mine fills. But, as little as I get to drive the car lately, it might be a while. The catch can depicted here unscrews from the machined top and the contents of the jar can be disposed of in your neighbors Camaro or other appropriate place. :hysterical:

 

 

Get off that Harley and ,"get on that Shelby"

Dave!

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Yes they are drained regularly - but I'd guess at least every couple thousand miles based on my driving habits. It is based on how much and how hard you drive the car. I'll post some pics later as mine fills. But, as little as I get to drive the car lately, it might be a while. The catch can depicted here unscrews from the machined top and the contents of the jar can be disposed of in your neighbors Camaro or other appropriate place. :hysterical:

 

:hysterical:

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Gentlemen, I am ignorant about this, can you enlighten me?

 

 

On each cam cover, you'll find a small black hose that is routed into either side of the intake manifold. Those hoses are there to vent the excess crankcase pressure. They serve an important purpose, however, the pressurized air that vents through those hoses contains a light mist of oil, which eventually gums up the inside of your intake manifold (or supercharger), your IMRC plates, etc. An oil catch can is installed to filter that oily air after it's vented from the crankcase, but before it can enter your intake.

 

Common practice back in the day was to remove those hoses from the valve covers, plug the intake ports, and clamp a breather directly to the valve cover. This, however, isn't smog legal and will leave an oily residue underneath your hood and around the engine bay in general.

 

Crankcase_breather_002.jpg

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John, Ken, I have what may be a silly question.

 

One of the warnings on the Conceptual Polymer site talks of limiting the pressure within the cans/glass. I'm curious if you would see much of pressure increase on a SC or TC motor within the catch can. Any ideas?

 

John, it would suck to have that half full glass catch shatter under pressure when lean on the throttle.

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John, Ken, I have what may be a silly question.

 

One of the warnings on the Conceptual Polymer site talks of limiting the pressure within the cans/glass. I'm curious if you would see much of pressure increase on a SC or TC motor within the catch can. Any ideas?

 

John, it would suck to have that half full glass catch shatter under pressure when lean on the throttle

 

 

When I talked with Dave, the owner of Conceptual Polymers, he stated this glass-based separator was his best seller. The glass is fairly thick and I'm not concerned with it breaking. I know a few local guys running oil separators that they made from air compressor glass filters. These are a little small but will work. Two of the guys have them in 700 RWHP Mustangs (2004 Cobras) and swear by 'em.

 

I had the same concerns at first, regarding breakage or excessive pressure, but the owner stated there hasn't been any issues with excessive pressure or reports of them breaking. I guess I'll know in time!!! Their solid aluminum separator is also a very nice unit. When I made my bracket, I placed rubber under the bracket to minimize any vibration and the glass has a rubber sleeve on the bottom. Once the hoses are connected to the milled aluminum top of my separator, it really becomes a very stable unit.

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^I agree. Although a good question, as long as the glass was built with this application in mind, it won't be an issue.

At the power plant I run, I've installed desiccant bowls made of glass to absorb any moisture in the plant air line, just before that pressurized air reaches the pneumatic valves that it actuates. Those glass bowls are surprisingly thin and my plant air system operates at over 100 psi. They've been installed for over 5 years without an issue. I chose glass, by the way, for the same reason John did, so that I can check the color of the desiccant for moisture level without inconvenience.

Jason, you're right though that with a blower or turbo, the crankcase pressure will rise, but unless the glass can wasn't designed to be used as an oil separator at all, you ought not to have any trouble with it.

 

Ken

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  • 10 months later...
  • 2 weeks later...
  • 5 months later...

Thanks John for directling me back to your thread I remember reading this last year but I never saved the topic so now I got it saved.

 

I think I like this design the best. I am hoping you might have a little time and make me one of those brackets and rubber gaskit, and hoses, and connector ends and I will buy the separater :happy feet: .

Let me know how much this would cost and if you have some extra time to dupilcate what you did on your car.

 

I Love the billet aluminum pulley that you had made up for our Whipple cars, the one I bought works perfectly I have not had a single problem with it. Thanks a Million for your attention to detail. :hyper:

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  • 2 weeks later...

Finally got around to adding this mod!

 

What I bought:

gallery_13043_1123_58094.jpg

 

What came in the box:

gallery_13043_1123_11401.jpg

 

Put it all together and hang it from the strut tower (drain valve circled):

gallery_13043_1123_33026.jpg

 

Remove the stock PCV hose (in this case, the Edelbrock hose that came with my supercharger) and expose the PCV fittings at the valve cover and intake:

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gallery_13043_1123_51295.jpg

 

Cut the stock fittings away from the stock hose to use on the supplied new hose:

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Installed with arrows showing direction of oil/air movement from PCV to separator to intake:

gallery_13043_1123_139432.jpg

 

 

30 minutes from start to finish!

 

 

Sam

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I've received a couple emails regarding oil separators which I mentioned in another thread and some of the members here were interested in the Conceptual Polymer oil separators. These are very high quality custom made oil separators which you can read about, and order, here:

 

(edit). Removed link to a non-supporting vendor as per Team Shelby Terms of Service.

 

Dave, the owner of Conceptual Polymers, also has a PDF explaining how oil separators work, which can be viewed here:

 

(edit) Removed link

 

I purchased the glass oil separator and completed the install without a hitch, except that I needed to make my own bracket since I didn't want to drill any holes in the strut tower. The bracket wasn't that hard to make and is rather simple.

 

On the SGT's and GT/SC's, the oil separator needs to be installed on the driver's side cam/valve cover. The oil separator needs to be installed in the PCV hose - between the PCV valve and the fitting where the hose goes into the throttle body. The PCV valve is located at the front of the cam/valve cover. The PCV hose is 5/8" hose which I chose to replace with a 1/2" fuel line hose. It was tight getting it to fit, but if you work it, oil it, it will slip on with a little muscle. I also enlarged the internal ends of the new 1/2" hose with my die grinder - which definitely helped fitment. The brass barbed fittings on the end of the oil separator are 1/2" so there was no problem with the hose fitting at the separator. If you choose, you could install a larger fitting at the oil separator (5/8") but I felt the 1/2" size is plenty large.

 

Below are a few pics of the install. The numbers on the photos indicate the following:

 

1 - PCV valve

2 - Throttle body fitting

3 - Bracket attachment point on a strut bolt

4 - PCV hose

S - Oil Separator

 

The first photo indicates where everything is located before the install. The next group of photos show my fabricated bracket, and the bracket attached to the oil separator. (The finished install will be continued below.)

post-26281-126862370397_thumb.jpg

 

 

 

Chris felt it necessary to remove your link to Conceptual Polymer. I guess he really is sold that the JLT one is better. :hysterical:

 

REALLY we can not help direct people to other brands?...............If Shelby had an oil seperator I would buy thiers.

 

 

WOW who's idea is this now to go through each thread and delete all links to any NON=PAYING vendors.

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Chris felt it necessary to remove your link to Conceptual Polymer. I guess he really is sold that the JLT one is better. :hysterical:

 

REALLY we can not help direct people to other brands?...............If Shelby had an oil seperator I would buy thiers.

 

 

WOW who's idea is this now to go through each thread and delete all links to any NON=PAYING vendors.

 

 

Not cool Zeus.

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Hey Chris, who the hell removed my link and for what reason? That is a very informative article and hopefully it will keep others from buying those "junk" catch cans. Contrary to public opinion, they are not all created equal. ALso, this thread has been there over sixteen months so someone has some explaining to do here. If SAI has a problem with a sixteen-month-old thread, then let them, or in in this case you, have the common courtesy to contact me before you take it upon yourself to edit my post.

 

And for those that think JTL is better, I believe they've been making them for two months now! You get what you pay for.

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