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First Oil Change.


CobraKaz
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Hi . I just started my car since its been in storage since December . Car has approx 1500 Miles on it . Change oil light came on . Anyone else have this ? When i put it away it said 87% left .

 

 

Where did it give you the percentage - I haven't seen that.

 

And no, I have not seen the light. Maybe it's being triggered by time rather than miles?

 

My first oil change is generally at 2,000 miles, then 3,000 miles later at 5,000 miles, and then every 5,000 miles from then on. It makes it easy to remember on 5,000 mile increments.

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Hi . I just started my car since its been in storage since December . Car has approx 1500 Miles on it . Change oil light came on . Anyone else have this ? When i put it away it said 87% left .

 

 

I was cautious about my first oil change---changed it at 600 miles and filter was full of shavings.Im only guessing, but your light must be "time".Id change the oil,its not worth risking the engine for a few bucks----bob

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Where did it give you the percentage - I haven't seen that.

 

And no, I have not seen the light. Maybe it's being triggered by time rather than miles?

 

My first oil change is generally at 2,000 miles, then 3,000 miles later at 5,000 miles, and then every 5,000 miles from then on. It makes it easy to remember on 5,000 mile increments.

 

If you look under the Light switch , there are INFO , RESET , and OPTION buttons . Can,t remember off hand but one of them will take you to the % of oil life remaining . Now it says Oil Change Required .

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Yes the computer will account for time as well as milage. So even if the car just sits and gathers no miles the oil life meter will change. Not sure look in the manual I think it is something like 3 months. So if your car has been sitting since December...The computer thinks it is time for a change.

 

Todd

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Yes the computer will account for time as well as milage. So even if the car just sits and gathers no miles the oil life meter will change. Not sure look in the manual I think it is something like 3 months. So if your car has been sitting since December...The computer thinks it is time for a change.

 

Todd

 

Thanks . I didn,t know that . Is theoil change straightforward or is theres a reset button you have to push when done .

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Thanks . I didn,t know that . Is theoil change straightforward or is theres a reset button you have to push when done .

 

 

Just clear the "oil change" reminder by pushing the "reset" button. Then scroll through the using the "info" button until you see the oil life screen. Then just push and hold the "reset" button for a few seconds. "oil life reset" or something close to that will be displayed.

 

The oil change itself is just like any other car/truck. no real issues.

 

Todd

Edited by tdusseau
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Just passed the 1k mark and am planning on changing the oil in the next few weeks when (hopefully) the roads clear of all the salt. Went shopping for oil and it looks like I'll have to purchase the recommended oil from the dealer, can't find the exact spec at the normal parts stores.

 

I was lucky . I found Castrol Oil 20/ 50 synthetic at our local Canadian Tire store for $38 . Got the filters from Ford dealer.

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I was lucky . I found Castrol Oil 20/ 50 synthetic at our local Canadian Tire store for $38 . Got the filters from Ford dealer.

 

 

not so lucky--the oil called for is 5/50 synthetic, not the 20/50--if its cold where you are,youll need the 5 vs the 20 just for viscosity, besdies the warrantyy.You need the B spec oil accoridng to Ford i get mine from K man---heres a link http://k-mansparts.com/items/motorcraft-filters-/fluids/motorcraft-5w-50-full-synthetic-motor-oil-xo-5w50-qgt-quart-xo-5w50-qgt-detail.htm'

He has the filter too

Edited by Torched10
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not so lucky--the oil called for is 5/50 synthetic, not the 20/50--if its cold where you are,youll need the 5 vs the 20 just for viscosity, besdies the warrantyy.You need the B spec oil accoridng to Ford i get mine from K man---heres a link http://k-mansparts.com/items/motorcraft-filters-/fluids/motorcraft-5w-50-full-synthetic-motor-oil-xo-5w50-qgt-quart-xo-5w50-qgt-detail.htm'

He has the filter too

 

Well thanks for that one . I thought it was all the same . The Castrol is B spec . I guess i,ll have to wait till summer to use the 20W . Oh well , back to the store and try ad find the 5w . Your lucky to get Mtorcraft oil that price , i bet they will Gouge me here for at least $12 .

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Well thanks for that one . I thought it was all the same . The Castrol is B spec . I guess i,ll have to wait till summer to use the 20W . Oh well , back to the store and try ad find the 5w . Your lucky to get Mtorcraft oil that price , i bet they will Gouge me here for at least $12 if i can even find it .I just found Castrol 5W50 , does anyone know if this is B spec oil .

Edited by CobraKaz
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At 1000 miles I kept the same oil in the crankcase since it is synthetic and did not appear to be signifcantly discolored. Changed the filter and cut it open (will take a few macro pics and post it this weekend). Found no metal shavings in the filter, but definitely the elements captured some blue and red-orange bits of sealant, gasket debries, etc.

 

I was cautious about my first oil change---changed it at 600 miles and filter was full of shavings.Im only guessing, but your light must be "time".Id change the oil,its not worth risking the engine for a few bucks----bob

 

Edited by Rod_Michel
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At 1000 miles I kept the same oil in the crankcase since it is synthetic and did not appear to be signifcantly discolored. Changed the filter and cut it open (will take a few macro pics and post it this weekend). Found no metal shavings in the filter, but definitely the elements captured some blue and red-orange bits of sealant, gasket debries, etc.

 

This is not the first time someone has posted about Metal shavings in the oil . Personally , i find this a little worrying . It may be a wise move to invest in some Filter Mags .

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At 1000 miles I kept the same oil in the crankcase since it is synthetic and did not appear to be signifcantly discolored. Changed the filter and cut it open (will take a few macro pics and post it this weekend). Found no metal shavings in the filter, but definitely the elements captured some blue and red-orange bits of sealant, gasket debries, etc.

 

 

 

The color of the oil is not a determining factor at all in regards to oil life and/or contaminants.

 

 

I changed my oil at 550 miles and will do another change at 3050 after which time I will continue with regular OCI's.

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This is not the first time someone has posted about Metal shavings in the oil . Personally , i find this a little worrying . It may be a wise move to invest in some Filter Mags .

 

 

I noticed it in my first couple of oil changes. It has subsided now that I have 5K miles on it. You would think that modern assembly, would result in none, yet like you said, many of us have seen it, with no apparent problems.

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Judgement of color is very relevant to the quality of petroleum products.

 

The color of the oil is not a determining factor at all in regards to oil life and/or contaminants.

 

 

I changed my oil at 550 miles and will do another change at 3050 after which time I will continue with regular OCI's.

Edited by Rod_Michel
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Just clear the "oil change" reminder by pushing the "reset" button. Then scroll through the using the "info" button until you see the oil life screen. Then just push and hold the "reset" button for a few seconds. "oil life reset" or something close to that will be displayed.

 

The oil change itself is just like any other car/truck. no real issues.

 

Todd

 

 

ONLY THING you need to be aware of... The oil filter is placed in such a way that when you unscrew it and remove it, if you're not careful, oil will run all into the crossmember. I rig up some heavy duty aluminum foil over a piece of cardboard and wedge it in there under the filter, so when you remove the filter the excess oil runs onto the foil/cardboard, and then down into my oil catch basin.

If the oil gets into that crossmember, you'll need to spray it out of there with 1/2 a can of "GUNK"

You have been warned...

Good luck,

GUS

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Judgement of color is very relevant to the quality of petroleum products.

 

 

 

Ok, so tell me the quality of Royal Purple then.....rhetorical...

 

Unless you have BIONIC eyes and can see the crap in suspension, there is no way to tell by color if an oil needs to be changed or not.

 

How can you tell by color that the additive pack or TBN is still intact or acceptable?

 

Some engines turn virgin oil black in less than 500 miles, however an oil analysis might tell you that the oil is good for another 5000 miles.

 

I'd like more than just an anecdotal response please.

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ONLY THING you need to be aware of... The oil filter is placed in such a way that when you unscrew it and remove it, if you're not careful, oil will run all into the crossmember. I rig up some heavy duty aluminum foil over a piece of cardboard and wedge it in there under the filter, so when you remove the filter the excess oil runs onto the foil/cardboard, and then down into my oil catch basin.

If the oil gets into that crossmember, you'll need to spray it out of there with 1/2 a can of "GUNK"

You have been warned...

Good luck,

GUS

 

GUS, good tip, nothing like a little alum foil and cardboard to the rescue - There must be some way to use some racing (duct) tape too biggrin.gif

 

Thanks - looking forward to doing mine soon.

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In the petroleum industry, it is standard practice to evaluate refined products based upon color. Color references similar to what you might expect to see with paints are used. If a refined product falls out of what is considered 'sales spec' the off color material is sent back into the processing stream for further refinement, consumed as plant fuel, or disposed of.

 

With regards to this discussion, the type of refined product used by Ford is based upon a 5W50 synthetic blend manufactured by Conoco Phillips. Synthetics usually are created using catalytic reforming. Numerous tests have demonstrated that synthetic oils degrade in terms of viscosity at a slower rate than more typical non synthenthic blends. Synthetics also tend to have fewer impurities such as sulfur compounds in them. Synthetic blends do change in composition within the engine from contact with metals, blowby, air intake, heat and pressure.

 

What gives the oil color? Most experienced engineers agree that the black color is usually attributed to asphaltenes. It does not take a high concentration of asphaltenes in order to visually observe a change in color. That said, paraffins and other impurities can give the oil color. What usually happens is that iron or other transition metals provide a 'node' so to speak in the body of the oil. These metallic nodes attract asphaltene compounds, generally paraffin compounds prefer bonding with asphaltenes.

 

You are absolutely correct, a laboratory analysis of the oil would provide guidance as to whether the oil was within specs. However most rational people will not spend the time or money testing their oil, instead they trust that the automakers and their vendors, in this case, Ford and Conoco-Phillips have conducted extensive testing of composition and gravity of the 5w50 synthetic blend over vastly different conditions. Most automakers recommend an oil change frequency between 5000-7500 miles, even for the first oil change!

 

Given what I have explained previously, if the oil is coal black, then statistically the oil likely has metallic ions suspended in it and there has been a compositional change with asphaltenes and paraffins. If the oil physically feels gritty, then that too is a good reason to wish to change the oil and filter. But if the oil is similar in color to fresh 5w50 synthetic and does not have a gritty texture and the filter element does not contain metal shavings visible to the naked eye or under simple 10-30x magnification (using a loupe like a Hastings Triplet), then it is unlikely to have degraded much, nor the engine suffered premature wear from extreme use, machining debries, or assembly imbalances (rods, pistons, crank, cams, bearings all installed properly and within proper tight tolerances ie good quality components).

 

Then there is a possibility that the 5w50 synthetic oil used contained special "break in" additives. Even if no additives were used, the cams, bearings, etc.. definitely do use special break in lubes which mix with the oil and assist in helping rings and bearings seat. Certainly using a sythentic from square one deviates from earlier break-in practices.

 

Many other professional petroleum engineer colleagues of mine whom run synthetic oils in their vehicles, will avoid unecessary additional expense of dumping out all of their expensive synthetic oil every 5000-7500 miles. Each of these engineers will visually inspect their oil, if it is tarry black, then most will change it, if it is still translucent and amber in color with no grit these individuals will instead just change the oil filter.

 

With all of this in mind, I thoroughly inspected my oil and cut open my oil filter to access the element. There was no compelling reason for me to believe that the oil circulating in my crankcase had deteriorated to the point that it needed to be discarded to a recycle drum. So I chose to use a new filter and topped up the crankcase with 1 quart.

 

Rod

 

 

Ok, so tell me the quality of Royal Purple then.....rhetorical...

 

Unless you have BIONIC eyes and can see the crap in suspension, there is no way to tell by color if an oil needs to be changed or not.

 

How can you tell by color that the additive pack or TBN is still intact or acceptable?

 

Some engines turn virgin oil black in less than 500 miles, however an oil analysis might tell you that the oil is good for another 5000 miles.

 

I'd like more than just an anecdotal response please.

 

Edited by Rod_Michel
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Hi . I just started my car since its been in storage since December . Car has approx 1500 Miles on it . Change oil light came on . Anyone else have this ? When i put it away it said 87% left .

 

 

I had 1500 miles on my car when I changed the oil and the info system said 3% life left. I was surprised with only 1500 miles on syn.oil. Used Ford's syn oil and a Ford Racing filter. The factory filter was a cheap piece of junk.

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In the petroleum industry, it is standard practice to evaluate refined products based upon color. Color references similar to what you might expect to see with paints are used. If a refined product falls out of what is considered 'sales spec' the off color material is sent back into the processing stream for further refinement, consumed as plant fuel, or disposed of.

 

With regards to this discussion, the type of refined product used by Ford is based upon a 5W50 synthetic blend manufactured by Conoco Phillips. Synthetics usually are created using catalytic reforming. Numerous tests have demonstrated that synthetic oils degrade in terms of viscosity at a slower rate than more typical non synthenthic blends. Synthetics also tend to have fewer impurities such as sulfur compounds in them. Synthetic blends do change in composition within the engine from contact with metals, blowby, air intake, heat and pressure.

 

What gives the oil color? Most experienced engineers agree that the black color is usually attributed to asphaltenes. It does not take a high concentration of asphaltenes in order to visually observe a change in color. That said, paraffins and other impurities can give the oil color. What usually happens is that iron or other transition metals provide a 'node' so to speak in the body of the oil. These metallic nodes attract asphaltene compounds, generally paraffin compounds prefer bonding with asphaltenes.

 

You are absolutely correct, a laboratory analysis of the oil would provide guidance as to whether the oil was within specs. However most rational people will not spend the time or money testing their oil, instead they trust that the automakers and their vendors, in this case, Ford and Conoco-Phillips have conducted extensive testing of composition and gravity of the 5w50 synthetic blend over vastly different conditions. Most automakers recommend an oil change frequency between 5000-7500 miles, even for the first oil change!

 

Given what I have explained previously, if the oil is coal black, then statistically the oil likely has metallic ions suspended in it and there has been a compositional change with asphaltenes and paraffins. If the oil physically feels gritty, then that too is a good reason to wish to change the oil and filter. But if the oil is similar in color to fresh 5w50 synthetic and does not have a gritty texture and the filter element does not contain metal shavings visible to the naked eye or under simple 10-30x magnification (using a loupe like a Hastings Triplet), then it is unlikely to have degraded much, nor the engine suffered premature wear from extreme use, machining debries, or assembly imbalances (rods, pistons, crank, cams, bearings all installed properly and within proper tight tolerances ie good quality components).

 

Then there is a possibility that the 5w50 synthetic oil used contained special "break in" additives. Even if no additives were used, the cams, bearings, etc.. definitely do use special break in lubes which mix with the oil and assist in helping rings and bearings seat. Certainly using a sythentic from square one deviates from earlier break-in practices.

 

Many other professional petroleum engineer colleagues of mine whom run synthetic oils in their vehicles, will avoid unecessary additional expense of dumping out all of their expensive synthetic oil every 5000-7500 miles. Each of these engineers will visually inspect their oil, if it is tarry black, then most will change it, if it is still translucent and amber in color with no grit these individuals will instead just change the oil filter.

 

With all of this in mind, I thoroughly inspected my oil and cut open my oil filter to access the element. There was no compelling reason for me to believe that the oil circulating in my crankcase had deteriorated to the point that it needed to be discarded to a recycle drum. So I chose to use a new filter and topped up the crankcase with 1 quart.

 

Rod

 

 

 

Excellent response. Thank you for a well thought out reply.

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In the petroleum industry, it is standard practice to evaluate refined products based upon color. Color references similar to what you might expect to see with paints are used. If a refined product falls out of what is considered 'sales spec' the off color material is sent back into the processing stream for further refinement, consumed as plant fuel, or disposed of.

 

With regards to this discussion, the type of refined product used by Ford is based upon a 5W50 synthetic blend manufactured by Conoco Phillips. Synthetics usually are created using catalytic reforming. Numerous tests have demonstrated that synthetic oils degrade in terms of viscosity at a slower rate than more typical non synthenthic blends. Synthetics also tend to have fewer impurities such as sulfur compounds in them. Synthetic blends do change in composition within the engine from contact with metals, blowby, air intake, heat and pressure.

 

What gives the oil color? Most experienced engineers agree that the black color is usually attributed to asphaltenes. It does not take a high concentration of asphaltenes in order to visually observe a change in color. That said, paraffins and other impurities can give the oil color. What usually happens is that iron or other transition metals provide a 'node' so to speak in the body of the oil. These metallic nodes attract asphaltene compounds, generally paraffin compounds prefer bonding with asphaltenes.

 

You are absolutely correct, a laboratory analysis of the oil would provide guidance as to whether the oil was within specs. However most rational people will not spend the time or money testing their oil, instead they trust that the automakers and their vendors, in this case, Ford and Conoco-Phillips have conducted extensive testing of composition and gravity of the 5w50 synthetic blend over vastly different conditions. Most automakers recommend an oil change frequency between 5000-7500 miles, even for the first oil change!

 

Given what I have explained previously, if the oil is coal black, then statistically the oil likely has metallic ions suspended in it and there has been a compositional change with asphaltenes and paraffins. If the oil physically feels gritty, then that too is a good reason to wish to change the oil and filter. But if the oil is similar in color to fresh 5w50 synthetic and does not have a gritty texture and the filter element does not contain metal shavings visible to the naked eye or under simple 10-30x magnification (using a loupe like a Hastings Triplet), then it is unlikely to have degraded much, nor the engine suffered premature wear from extreme use, machining debries, or assembly imbalances (rods, pistons, crank, cams, bearings all installed properly and within proper tight tolerances ie good quality components).

 

Then there is a possibility that the 5w50 synthetic oil used contained special "break in" additives. Even if no additives were used, the cams, bearings, etc.. definitely do use special break in lubes which mix with the oil and assist in helping rings and bearings seat. Certainly using a sythentic from square one deviates from earlier break-in practices.

 

Many other professional petroleum engineer colleagues of mine whom run synthetic oils in their vehicles, will avoid unecessary additional expense of dumping out all of their expensive synthetic oil every 5000-7500 miles. Each of these engineers will visually inspect their oil, if it is tarry black, then most will change it, if it is still translucent and amber in color with no grit these individuals will instead just change the oil filter.

 

With all of this in mind, I thoroughly inspected my oil and cut open my oil filter to access the element. There was no compelling reason for me to believe that the oil circulating in my crankcase had deteriorated to the point that it needed to be discarded to a recycle drum. So I chose to use a new filter and topped up the crankcase with 1 quart.

 

Rod

 

only the good stuff every 3000 miles ,283351-R1-26-25A.jpg :dance::dance::dance:

283351-R1-26-25A.jpg

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I had 1500 miles on my car when I changed the oil and the info system said 3% life left. I was surprised with only 1500 miles on syn.oil. Used Ford's syn oil and a Ford Racing filter. The factory filter was a cheap piece of junk.

 

 

Just so you know next time,the "oil life" is just timed as to days not actually oil qualityin the engine.Of course if you drive it alot, itll be fairly accurate,but if its a low mileage car, itll say 3% when its still in great shape

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