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New car question


smbullett
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Group,

 

I took delivery of my Shelby last weekend. The paint on it is very clean and the body surface is as smooth as glass. At the dealership, the salesman asked if I wanted to do an initial claybar and detail on the car to maintain that new car look, just thinking of only taking care of my investment I said sure.

 

After talking with some of my car buddies at work during the week, they all agreed that I shouldn't have to claybar a new car. On top of that they also said that I shouldn't let the dealership put a wax or sealer coat on the car for at least 3 months. Reason being that the paint on the car is still out gasing as a part of it's drying process. Putting on a coat of wax or sealer would trap the gases and would not allow the paint to cure correctly.

 

Can anyone knowledgeable in auto detailing or automotive painting confirm this? Thanks.

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A new car with a factory paint job can be waxed the moment it is rolled out of the manufacturing plant. Cars that have factory paint jobs are cured at much higher temperatures, sometimes as high as 300 degrees in special baking ovens. At a factory level, the car goes through the painting and baking process without any of the rubber, plastic, and cloth components installed. This is why they can expose the car and it's fresh paint to such high temperatures. These high temperatures and special paints used at the factory level insures the paint is fully cured by the time the car is completely assembled.

 

After-market paint finishes however, are cured at a much lower temperature to ensure the method of baking or heating the paint doesn't melt non-metal components such as wiring and vinyl. For this reason, it's best to follow the specific paint manufactures recommendations for care and maintenance of fresh paint. Most paint manufactures that supply paint to the refinish industry recommend that you allow anywhere from 30 to 90 days curing time after the paint is applied before you apply the first application of wax.

 

 

SOURCE CITED

 

I've clay barred my last two new cars as soon as I got them. I also slapped on a coat of AIO and SG after claying. This one will be no different.

Edited by lawdude
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What was mentioned to those of us who bought SGT's is that they came to Las Vegas by rail. Shipment by rail leaves, apparently, tailings that are quite fine and that need to be removed by clay bar. My understanding is that most domestic cars travel, for at least part of their journey, by rail.

 

Bottom line, there is nothing but good that can come from clay barring a new car. Much earlier on this forum, before it was named Team Shelby, many early members reported that clay barring their new Shelby was a great bonding experience between owner and car in that you touch, with your own hands, every square inch of the car. That has a secondary benefit of allowing you to notice little (and not so little) bits of damage or imperfections.

 

Clay barring a car is a ton of work but never a wasted effort IMHO.

 

Jim

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Ive used clay bar on a show car,but havent on the Shelby.The finish was pretty smooth,just a little train dust,so used Meguiars Mirror Glaze,which really deepens the color.Do it once a month.The car wont see rain, so wont be waxing it.On show cars,Ive found waxing over time tends to oxidize,reduces the sheen, IMHO.But if i drove it id wax it for sure.

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smbullet,

 

I am in the collision repair business and can tell you that by the time you actually received your car from the dealer, it is already cured as much as needed. Waxing it is a good idea, to keep it shiny and new looking. As far as the clay baring goes, if it needed to be done, the dealer should have done it as part of their pre-delivery process. It is true that some cars get "Rail Dust" when transported by rail road and it does often take using a clay bar to get it off. However, its a pretty intrusive process to the finish on your clear coat and often needs to be waxed afterward to get the "fine" scratches out that the clay bar causes. I do dealer work for a Lexus dealership here in Dallas and have to clay bar their cars from time to time for them. It's a very time consuming process but does clean the entire car of any surface debris.

 

 

Shane

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smbullet,

 

I am in the collision repair business and can tell you that by the time you actually received your car from the dealer, it is already cured as much as needed. Waxing it is a good idea, to keep it shiny and new looking. As far as the clay baring goes, if it needed to be done, the dealer should have done it as part of their pre-delivery process. It is true that some cars get "Rail Dust" when transported by rail road and it does often take using a clay bar to get it off. However, its a pretty intrusive process to the finish on your clear coat and often needs to be waxed afterward to get the "fine" scratches out that the clay bar causes. I do dealer work for a Lexus dealership here in Dallas and have to clay bar their cars from time to time for them. It's a very time consuming process but does clean the entire car of any surface debris.

 

 

Shane

If you prepped your car, clay bar doesn't leave scratches. And if it did, how will wax get them out?

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for very small scrtaches,not thru the clear,i use Meguiars light compound, it used to be #3.Then use the swirl remover.it used to be #9, but the recent bottle is #2.After you use the 3 and get the scrtach out, then use the swirl remover in a lateral or horizontal path, to buff aqway the very slight duyllness youll see after you use #3. Wax is just that, wax--it doesnt remove anything at all.

 

I think the names are now ScrtachX (#3) and swirllX2 (#9)

Edited by Torched10
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The debris that clay baring gets off leaves small scratches in the clear coat. Waxing doesn't necessarily get rid of them but hides them with the wax.

 

You said it...waxing doesn’t get rid of the problem, it just hides the problem. To actually repair the scratches, you need to polish the surface. You must prepared the car correctly, handle the clay correctly, and apply the clay correctly to avoid scratching the surface. After clay, you use a polish that is abrasive enough to repair and imperfections in the surface. Waxes and sealants protect the finish.

 

It seems you use a filler wax to "hide" scratches. When the filler wears out, the scratches reappear. If they were properly repaired the first time, they would not reappear.

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for very small scrtaches,not thru the clear,i use Meguiars light compound, it used to be #3.Then use the swirl remover.it used to be #9, but the recent bottle is #2.After you use the 3 and get the scrtach out, then use the swirl remover in a lateral or horizontal path, to buff aqway the very slight duyllness youll see after you use #3. Wax is just that, wax--it doesnt remove anything at all.

 

I think the names are now ScrtachX (#3) and swirllX2 (#9)

 

 

This is exactly what I would suggest. The scratches become finer with each step until they are nearly gone. The wax will only seal off the finished product and mask any final imperfections that don't buff out.

 

 

The beginning of this post was a simple question if a new car should be clay bared by the dealer. I was only offering my suggestion that it really shouldn't need it. If it does, and the dealer does it, then expect to have to do some buffing afterward. They do not have the most competent people completing the task.

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XtremeShelby

 

What is the best product to remove wax(start with a clean bare finish)?

 

I have some haze/light swirls and would like to start from square one.

 

 

Dawn...plain Dawn dishwashing liquid. Mix a bit of it with hot water and wash your car with it. You don't want to do this very often because it is rather harsh but it is the best way to remove, wax, oil and dirt...start from square one. The instructions for Zaino actually advocate washing your car with dawn to get rid of other finishes and grease.

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XtremeShelby

 

What is the best product to remove wax(start with a clean bare finish)?

 

I have some haze/light swirls and would like to start from square one.

Todd if you've got swirls,youre rubbing too hard with what ever your using.Swirls are in the clear, and taking off the wax wont get rid of them.As Ive mentioned earlier, I would use the maguiars swirl remover---just rub it on lightly,across the grain of the swirls)( it may take several applcaitons), then Id use the glaze product,and if you use wax,put that on at the end.If you want a demo,we could meet somehwhere in between--bob

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Every new vehicle needs to be clayed. If you dont clay you are just protecting dirt when you wax. Clay can scratch the clear coat if it is to aggresive and or very contaminated with particles. Claying a vehicle is no worse than washing or drying a car if its done right. If you really want to start with a clean paint surface use car soap and use two to three times the recommended capfuls. Most car soaps will strip away wax (with one capful of soap)because the manufactorers want you to buy more soap and wax. Its clever marketing. My Show Car Wash does not strip wax or sealant. Now for swirls and scratch removal, most over the counter removers only cover up the damage because most consumers DO NOT know how to use a compound properly to remove swirls and could cause more damage to the car. Here is a good link for reading and learning about what works on our shelby's.

 

http://www.teamshelby.com/forums/index.php?showtopic=24464

 

Now if you have questions about proper detailing give me a call and ask away. I do this for a living and see what works and what doesnt first hand. 773-612-1332.

 

I own a black Shelby GT and it sees alot of abuse but looks awesome in any light.

DSC02551.jpg

 

Heres a picture of a 1990 LX 7Up car with 20 year old original swirled up paint. The drivers side is after a proper buff.

DSC02638.jpg

 

One last point, the EPA would not let a car leave the plant with uncured paint. Cars now a days with the great technology we have are cured and ready to be protected right before the leave for the dealer. Take a tour one day and see how the cars are built and painted and you will be amazed at what you see.

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Todd if you've got swirls,youre rubbing too hard with what ever your using.Swirls are in the clear, and taking off the wax wont get rid of them.As Ive mentioned earlier, I would use the maguiars swirl remover---just rub it on lightly,across the grain of the swirls)( it may take several applcaitons), then Id use the glaze product,and if you use wax,put that on at the end.If you want a demo,we could meet somehwhere in between--bob

 

Bob

Dont have any real swirl marks just some light lines that I want to remove. I actually used the Swirl-X the first go around but now have that look like a few spiders have laid their webs. I have a daily driver so she has seen dust, rain, frost..So just looking to strip everything I put on 2 months ago and start over.

 

And the get together sounds good, will PM you when my schedule settles down.

 

Todd

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Every new vehicle needs to be clayed. If you dont clay you are just protecting dirt when you wax. Clay can scratch the clear coat if it is to aggresive and or very contaminated with particles. Claying a vehicle is no worse than washing or drying a car if its done right. If you really want to start with a clean paint surface use car soap and use two to three times the recommended capfuls. Most car soaps will strip away wax (with one capful of soap)because the manufactorers want you to buy more soap and wax. Its clever marketing. My Show Car Wash does not strip wax or sealant. Now for swirls and scratch removal, most over the counter removers only cover up the damage because most consumers DO NOT know how to use a compound properly to remove swirls and could cause more damage to the car. Here is a good link for reading and learning about what works on our shelby's.

 

http://www.teamshelby.com/forums/index.php?showtopic=24464

 

Now if you have questions about proper detailing give me a call and ask away. I do this for a living and see what works and what doesnt first hand. 773-612-1332.

 

I own a black Shelby GT and it sees alot of abuse but looks awesome in any light.

DSC02551.jpg

 

Heres a picture of a 1990 LX 7Up car with 20 year old original swirled up paint. The drivers side is after a proper buff.

DSC02638.jpg

 

One last point, the EPA would not let a car leave the plant with uncured paint. Cars now a days with the great technology we have are cured and ready to be protected right before the leave for the dealer. Take a tour one day and see how the cars are built and painted and you will be amazed at what you see.

 

Thanks for the info.

 

This is my first black car and I am finding out the hard way that this looking clean thing in bright sunlight is a real P.I.T.A. Was looking at her in the garage and though WOW, she looks good. Pulled her out for day of fun and when the bright clear sky sun hit her, I said Woah! I have some work to do!!! :cry:

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Any advice on water spot removal. :(

 

Any cleaner wax combo works fine.Must have some grit in it,but you dont need much to take it out. As Ive said many tomes here (Im getting boring I know),but if you use the Megiars glaze, it'll also take the spots out

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Man, that's a SWEEET lookin' little Shelby GT ya got there bud.

 

And it's pretty clear to me that I just *gotta* get me a set of those Alcoa dura-brite's!

 

 

Good job,

Phill

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Every new vehicle needs to be clayed. If you dont clay you are just protecting dirt when you wax. Clay can scratch the clear coat if it is to aggresive and or very contaminated with particles. Claying a vehicle is no worse than washing or drying a car if its done right. If you really want to start with a clean paint surface use car soap and use two to three times the recommended capfuls. Most car soaps will strip away wax (with one capful of soap)because the manufactorers want you to buy more soap and wax. Its clever marketing. My Show Car Wash does not strip wax or sealant. Now for swirls and scratch removal, most over the counter removers only cover up the damage because most consumers DO NOT know how to use a compound properly to remove swirls and could cause more damage to the car. Here is a good link for reading and learning about what works on our shelby's.

 

http://www.teamshelby.com/forums/index.php?showtopic=24464

 

Now if you have questions about proper detailing give me a call and ask away. I do this for a living and see what works and what doesnt first hand. 773-612-1332.

 

I own a black Shelby GT and it sees alot of abuse but looks awesome in any light.

DSC02551.jpg

 

Heres a picture of a 1990 LX 7Up car with 20 year old original swirled up paint. The drivers side is after a proper buff.

DSC02638.jpg

 

One last point, the EPA would not let a car leave the plant with uncured paint. Cars now a days with the great technology we have are cured and ready to be protected right before the leave for the dealer. Take a tour one day and see how the cars are built and painted and you will be amazed at what you see.

 

Thanks ShowCar, I feel a lot better now and will take my car in this week. The dealer was pretty cool about waiting for me to decide when I want to do it. Is there anything to watch out for after the claybar or give instruction prior to letting the dealer have the car for the service? I know for a fact that this dealer pulls in a detail guy to do their cars.

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I replied to your PM Smbullet. Jim, I clay mine two to three times a year. I drive her alot and race it alot. Try to clay it once a year if it spends alot of time in the garage.

 

ShowCar,

 

Thank you very much, I drive mine to work a bit, but garaged at both ends, I wash the car once every week or two as it gets dusty more than dirty and the brake dust is too much to look at, but I guess I could just quick detail spray and be done, it will definitely be harder to wash the car as the weather gets colder.

 

Thanks again.

 

Regards,

Jim

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