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Best place to get a Co2 Fire Extinguisher


skiph

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Knowing there is a "bit" of a risk of getting all kind of different suggestions on this, here we go.

 

I prefer to always carry a Fire Extinguisher in my cars. For the other cars I have, dry chemical is OK as I'm good with the mess they make on them and my insurance Co paying for damage and cleanup to get things put back together properly.

 

However, for my pride and joy, I prefer Co2, but can'f find one ANYWHERE local to buy. :cry:

 

So, looks like it is a purchase on the web for this one. But, with all the hits I'm getting, I thought I would ask all the experts out there on what some suggestions would be (based on first hand purchase would be best of course).

 

With all that said, thoughts everybody?

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Knowing there is a "bit" of a risk of getting all kind of different suggestions on this, here we go.

 

I prefer to always carry a Fire Extinguisher in my cars. For the other cars I have, dry chemical is OK as I'm good with the mess they make on them and my insurance Co paying for damage and cleanup to get things put back together properly.

 

However, for my pride and joy, I prefer Co2, but can'f find one ANYWHERE local to buy. :cry:

 

So, looks like it is a purchase on the web for this one. But, with all the hits I'm getting, I thought I would ask all the experts out there on what some suggestions would be (based on first hand purchase would be best of course).

 

With all that said, thoughts everybody?

I got a Halon extinguisher at Aircraft Spruce http://www.aircraftspruce.com/catalog/pspages/h3rhalon.php

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I got a Halon extinguisher at Aircraft Spruce http://www.aircraftspruce.com/catalog/pspages/h3rhalon.php

I did the same thing and got it from the same outfit. Do you see some advantage to CO2? If so, please share because I am not aware of it (and, trust me, that does not mean there is no advantage). Thanks in advance.

 

Jim

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Co2 and Halon are not good for outside gasoline fires. Halon was designed for enclosed computer room environments and even then it takes huge amounts to be effective. The heat from gasoline fires is very hot and you can not usually get close enough to make Co2 effective with a handheld bottle.

 

Your first idea was the best for outside gasoline fires.

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Check out this product, its a replacement for halon and is made specifically for vehicle applications.

 

Halguard

 

Chemically identical product as that offered by Aircraft Spruce, http://www.aircraftspruce.com/catalog/pspages/h3rhalon.php but appears to be marketed directly to the automotive crowd. I had not seen this company before. Nice find.

 

Jim

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I went with Co2 as I thought they took Halon off the market.

 

True on Halon being "the solution" for computer rooms, and I seem to remember commercial kitchens over the stoves and things (I think). Hummm..on additional thinking I might go that route for my kitchen too, to ovoid the mess from dry chemical.

 

 

The idea is to get to something before it gets out of hand. Once any car fire is to hot to get close to use Co2, it's to hot to get to with anything :angry22:

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The idea is to get to something before it gets out of hand. Once any car fire is to hot to get close to use Co2, it's to hot to get to with anything :angry22:

Remember the fire extinguisher mantra: "May the car you use it on not be yours."

 

Jim

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Halon 1211, 1301 or 2402 are banned as of 1998 per the EPA except for aviation fire suppression applications, thus the reason they are still allowed to sell those ones. The ones that I posted are a new "clean" version of halon which can be used on vehicles and can be recharged if used.

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Halon 1211, 1301 or 2402 are banned as of 1998 per the EPA except for aviation fire suppression applications, thus the reason they are still allowed to sell those ones. The ones that I posted are a new "clean" version of halon which can be used on vehicles and can be recharged if used.

 

Thanks zeindog. Never knew there was an exemption for aircraft.

 

Whats the diff between the 1211, 1301 & 2402?

 

Steve

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The numbers have to do with the chemical makeup of the halon. The first number is the number of bromine molecules, the second is the number of flourine molecules, the third is the number of chlorine molecules and the fourth is the number of carbon molecules. I needed a little help from my old chemistry of fire books but I remember learning about halon a few years ago. They are just variations of halon and were developed at different points in time.

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I'm using 1211. Great stuff. I use it in all the airplanes I fly and its great for the Shelby too. Actually I have not used it--it is there just in case!

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Knowing there is a "bit" of a risk of getting all kind of different suggestions on this, here we go.

 

I prefer to always carry a Fire Extinguisher in my cars. For the other cars I have, dry chemical is OK as I'm good with the mess they make on them and my insurance Co paying for damage and cleanup to get things put back together properly.

 

However, for my pride and joy, I prefer Co2, but can'f find one ANYWHERE local to buy. :cry:

 

So, looks like it is a purchase on the web for this one. But, with all the hits I'm getting, I thought I would ask all the experts out there on what some suggestions would be (based on first hand purchase would be best of course).

 

With all that said, thoughts everybody?

Check out Griot's Garage at this link

 

http://www.griotsgarage.com/p2p/searchResu...vals&page=1

 

Jim

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