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When I start my car it makes a loud ticking sound.It get better after about 30 seconds but does not go away.I just started noticing it in the last couple of days.Just had a Whipple super charger installed two weeks ago.I am using Ford oil and filter.Has anybody had this problem?

 

Can you tell if it's a valvetrain tic like a hydraulic lash adjuster vs something in the S/C or a pulley, etc? You might be able to isolate it with alength of vacuum hose held to your ear or an automotive steth if you have access to one.

 

Is this the FRP Whipple 3V SuperPack? 400 or 550HP tune? Did they install the FRP tune? Did they (or another shop) do a custom tune after the install?

 

If it started doing it at the first cold-start after the S/C install I'd call them immediately and see what they have to say because it would seem to be something they did and the longer you wait the less chance you have any leverage with them. Were you there when they did the install? ...or when they completed the install and first fired it up? Did you notice anything then? Did you ask them any quetions about the install? Did they change the oil and/or filter at the same time? Did you check the filter to be sure (some shops change the oil as a matter of course on a S/C install)? Check your receipt to see what, if any, parts outside the FRP Superpack (if that's it) you were charged for. Ask about any and all that aren't clear.

 

Also ask them if they tape the intake ports closed as a matter of professional practice while working on the install -- until they were ready to drop the S/C on. Get a copy of the install manual and familiarize yourself with the install so you can ask them some questions about procedures it instructs them to do that possibly they did not (like taping the ports). Ask them how many of this specific install they've done in the last 30 days and how the installs went (open-ended questions are best). Ask if they turn off the rev limiter in the tune as a matter of practice. If it's a big shop ask these questions to the actual tech who did your work (if possible) and then see the service manager.

 

Sounds nutty, but I'd be sure to see them in person and I'd likely tape (concealed) the whole discussion ...yeah, I know it sounds crazy, but the tape is much easier to erase later than getting them to recriminate themselves once they realize you're you're not going to roll over -- it might be the only leverage you have to nego later if you're sure it was fine before you went there because they aren't going to just 'fess-up even they knew they screwed up.

 

If it sounds like valvetrain, it may be just low oil pressure to a lash adjuster but I can't see how that would spontaneously occur if no oil/filter change (and you use FMC oil/filter) unless there was abuse -- turns my stomach to think how it could have been caused.

 

Would you characterize this as a trusted full-time engine/dyno shop run by real professionals? Or more a repair/service facility that also does installs?

 

Might be worth sharing the name of the place because others may be able to provide insight on their experiences and that might help you feel better about this.

 

Genuinely sorry if my post adds you your apprehension ...not my intent, but tics don't just appear unless oil/filter changed, something got in the port or it was revved cold or over-revved (ouch, sorry). Hope it turns out to be oil. Boyscout's motto: Be prepared. Might want see your lawyer ...with the tape if it isn't.

 

Dan

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Can you tell if it's a valvetrain tic like a hydraulic lash adjuster vs something in the S/C or a pulley, etc? You might be able to isolate it with alength of vacuum hose held to your ear or an automotive steth if you have access to one.

 

Is this the FRP Whipple 3V SuperPack? 400 or 550HP tune? Did they install the FRP tune? Did they (or another shop) do a custom tune after the install?

 

If it started doing it at the first cold-start after the S/C install I'd call them immediately and see what they have to say because it would seem to be something they did and the longer you wait the less chance you have any leverage with them. Were you there when they did the install? ...or when they completed the install and first fired it up? Did you notice anything then? Did you ask them any quetions about the install? Did they change the oil and/or filter at the same time? Did you check the filter to be sure (some shops change the oil as a matter of course on a S/C install)? Check your receipt to see what, if any, parts outside the FRP Superpack (if that's it) you were charged for. Ask about any and all that aren't clear.

 

Also ask them if they tape the intake ports closed as a matter of professional practice while working on the install -- until they were ready to drop the S/C on. Get a copy of the install manual and familiarize yourself with the install so you can ask them some questions about procedures it instructs them to do that possibly they did not (like taping the ports). Ask them how many of this specific install they've done in the last 30 days and how the installs went (open-ended questions are best). Ask if they turn off the rev limiter in the tune as a matter of practice. If it's a big shop ask these questions to the actual tech who did your work (if possible) and then see the service manager.

 

Sounds nutty, but I'd be sure to see them in person and I'd likely tape (concealed) the whole discussion ...yeah, I know it sounds crazy, but the tape is much easier to erase later than getting them to recriminate themselves once they realize you're you're not going to roll over -- it might be the only leverage you have to nego later if you're sure it was fine before you went there because they aren't going to just 'fess-up even they knew they screwed up.

 

If it sounds like valvetrain, it may be just low oil pressure to a lash adjuster but I can't see how that would spontaneously occur if no oil/filter change (and you use FMC oil/filter) unless there was abuse -- turns my stomach to think how it could have been caused.

 

Would you characterize this as a trusted full-time engine/dyno shop run by real professionals? Or more a repair/service facility that also does installs?

 

Might be worth sharing the name of the place because others may be able to provide insight on their experiences and that might help you feel better about this.

 

Genuinely sorry if my post adds you your apprehension ...not my intent, but tics don't just appear unless oil/filter changed, something got in the port or it was revved cold or over-revved (ouch, sorry). Hope it turns out to be oil. Boyscout's motto: Be prepared. Might want see your lawyer ...with the tape if it isn't.

 

Dan

It started two weeks after super charger was installed.I changed the oil and filter my self about 1500 miles ago.Whipple installed the FRP tune local dealer installed s/c.They did a great job.I went with the 400 hp so I would not void my warranty.As far as abuse I drive it hard.I think it has always had a slight tick.I ordered a Ford Racing filter to try.It does not sound like it is coming from the s/c.

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It started two weeks after super charger was installed.I changed the oil and filter my self about 1500 miles ago.Whipple installed the FRP tune local dealer installed s/c.They did a great job.I went with the 400 hp so I would not void my warranty.As far as abuse I drive it hard.I think it has always had a slight tick.I ordered a Ford Racing filter to try.It does not sound like it is coming from the s/c.

 

 

Ok, cancel the recorder and the lawyers (lol) :happy feet:

 

So, rev-limiter sould be active on FRP tune. Can you tell if it's coming from valve-train vs some light piston slap/rocking? That tends to quiet down like you said as the piston expands. I recall reading thru the Ford diagnostic procedure for valve-train ticking some time ago and they did mention to check the oil-bleed holes for blockage, i.e. a sluggish hydraulic lash adjuster. There's a whole procedure to bench test them that someone posted a long time ago but what a royal PITA to take 'em out. I'm assuming you still have low miles (was that the first oil change?) so sludge/gunk blocking the HLA bleed hole seems remote, imo, tho a maching defect is possible. Might be worth it to change the oil again (into a very clean drain pan) when the oil is good and hot and let it settle out for a 30-60 minutes. Then slowly pour it off thru fine-mesh screen to see if any debris and feel thru the last couple ounces with your fingers for any fine debris you can actually feel ...might indicate piston-skirt damage. If clean (which it bet it is) an oil pressure check might help. If low it could be a pump problem or bearing damage (again seems unlikely at low miles). The dealer will probably do a pressure check first since that could definately cause valvetrain tic. I assume you let the pressure fully come up after you changed the oil before any revs. A simple cause could be just a damaged/defective drain-back seal in the oil filter that's causing a longer time for the HLAs to pump-up -- still 30 seconds seems very long ...I'd expect only 4-5 sec or so, like when you start it after changing oil/filter, so that's another reason to try another oil/filter change. Well, at least you still have powertrain warranty so it should be covered if it comes to that. Hopefully you'll find it with a little sleuthing.

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Check the stock Ford idler pulleys.

 

Mine do not like the blower belt, especially when cold. I am replacing them with the Steeda billet idler pulleys this weekend. I will post if that solves the problem.

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Mine has had small ticking to it since day one on the passenger side when down by the front pass tire and several other "ticks"...aluminum engine, injectors, stainless exhaust...I have no idea...I do however think it runs a good deal harder at 10k miles than it did at 2k though. Mine runs real hard, like my car guy friends wonder how it only has 320hp hard. Love this car. Runs like a champ.

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I would not go with 50 weight oil. I would try 5W-30 first before jumping to 5W-50. Actually I would try 0W-30. The 50 only comes into play when the engine is hot. If the engine is ticking when you start, and the oil is cold, the 50 weight will have no effect except to be slower to pump througout the engine and exasperating the problem. The 0W-20 or 0W-30 will pump much quicker reaching all points of the engine quicker than the 5 Weight. And this engine, and the bearings, clearances, etc, were never designed for 50 weight oil. The engine oil passages, bearings, clearances etc, were designed for 20 or 30 weight oil. You don't change to 50 weight oil just because there is a ticking.

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I would not go with 50 weight oil. I would try 5W-30 first before jumping to 5W-50. Actually I would try 0W-30. The 50 only comes into play when the engine is hot. If the engine is ticking when you start, and the oil is cold, the 50 weight will have no effect except to be slower to pump througout the engine and exasperating the problem. The 0W-20 or 0W-30 will pump much quicker reaching all points of the engine quicker than the 5 Weight. And this engine, and the bearings, clearances, etc, were never designed for 50 weight oil. The engine oil passages, bearings, clearances etc, were designed for 20 or 30 weight oil. You don't change to 50 weight oil just because there is a ticking.

 

+1 - the 4.6 3V uses 5-20W primarily because the variable cam timing is oil pressure activated. I would speak with Ford Racing before changing the oil viscosity,

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5W20, 5W30 and 5W50 are all the same weights (5W) in cold testing -- essential for quick pressure to the upper engine/valve-train. The second number indicates their viscocity at operating temperatures and, in effect, their ability to maintain an adequate film under progressively higher bearing loads. As a result, a 5W20 gets to the upper engine no faster than a 5W50, but *does* offer less drag at full-warm operating speeds -- i.e. better milage in EPA tests. So manufacturers spec the thinnest oil that will still adequately accept the maximum engineered loads for that engine to squeak out the best EPA nums without sacrificing premature wear under typical driving conditions.

 

So if you pump up your 3V from 300 to 550 HP with a S/C, that 5W20 is not going to maintain the same bearing film under the higher loads, especially on the rod bearings that take the highest shock loads of combustion (and hopefully never see the absurdly brutal loads of [pre]detonation with any regularity).

 

While there is evidence to suggest that valvetrains tend to last longer with lighter conventional mineral-based oils (but which then can't protect from high bearing loads as well), I've read nothing whatsoever to suggest that a modern engineered full-synthetic 5W50 that meets API-SM increases OHC valvetrain wear.

 

Moreover, Motrcraft 5W50 (WSS-M2C931_B was specifically engineered for fast cold flow, overhead cams, and severe bearing loads. If your 3V is stock or nearly so, no prob using the spec oil, but my thinking is that if you significantly increase bearing loads by supercharging your 3V, then you'll want more robust bearing protection, preferably from a wide-range full-synthetic specifically formulated for OHC valvetrains and S/C spplications. WSS-M2C931_B was spec'd by Ford for the FGT and GT500 specifically for that purpose so my thinking is it's agreat choice for a kicked-up 3V as well since ...especially since, if anything, I'd expect the hand-built system-blueprinted 4Vs to have tighter tolerances than the production-built 3Vs anyway.

 

Here's the link to Motorcraft 5W50 and it's characteristics (pdf).

 

Just some thoughts ...I'm certainly no expert on oils.

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5W20, 5W30 and 5W50 are all the same weights (5W) in cold testing -- essential for quick pressure to the upper engine/valve-train. The second number indicates their viscocity at operating temperatures and, in effect, their ability to maintain an adequate film under progressively higher bearing loads. As a result, a 5W20 gets to the upper engine no faster than a 5W50, but *does* offer less drag at full-warm operating speeds -- i.e. better milage in EPA tests. So manufacturers spec the thinnest oil that will still adequately accept the maximum engineered loads for that engine to squeak out the best EPA nums without sacrificing premature wear under typical driving conditions.

 

So if you pump up your 3V from 300 to 550 HP with a S/C, that 5W20 is not going to maintain the same bearing film under the higher loads, especially on the rod bearings that take the highest shock loads of combustion (and hopefully never see the absurdly brutal loads of [pre]detonation with any regularity).

 

While there is evidence to suggest that valvetrains tend to last longer with lighter conventional mineral-based oils (but which then can't protect from high bearing loads as well), I've read nothing whatsoever to suggest that a modern engineered full-synthetic 5W50 that meets API-SM increases OHC valvetrain wear.

 

Moreover, Motrcraft 5W50 (WSS-M2C931_B was specifically engineered for fast cold flow, overhead cams, and severe bearing loads. If your 3V is stock or nearly so, no prob using the spec oil, but my thinking is that if you significantly increase bearing loads by supercharging your 3V, then you'll want more robust bearing protection, preferably from a wide-range full-synthetic specifically formulated for OHC valvetrains and S/C spplications. WSS-M2C931_B was spec'd by Ford for the FGT and GT500 specifically for that purpose so my thinking is it's agreat choice for a kicked-up 3V as well since ...especially since, if anything, I'd expect the hand-built system-blueprinted 4Vs to have tighter tolerances than the production-built 3Vs anyway.

 

Here's the link to Motorcraft 5W50 and it's characteristics (pdf).

 

Just some thoughts ...I'm certainly no expert on oils.

 

Makes sense +1

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Dan, you are so correct. I forgot about all being the same weight when cold.

 

You may wish to consider an engine flush to see if you could remove anything that is blocking an oil passage or if a lifter is contaminated. Follow the instructions religiously and do not rev up while the flush is in the engine. Then fresh oil and filter. Run a short time, and change again.

 

good Luck and keep us posted.

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  • 1 month later...

As I am getting a s/c install next week and I was due for an oil change I had the dealer check the ticking...he said it was the injectors on my car as I suspected. Cool!

 

They also recommend the factory recommended semi-synthetic...

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You know whats funny, when I read the title to this thread I said to myself,"Could this be the same thing i'm hearing". My car has 300 miles on it and everytime I get a chance to take my car around the block, I start it, open the hood to take off the trickle charger and I hear the same loud ticking. It sounds just like the old days when the aftermarket headers leaked. It does however go away after about 30sec. I stuck my hand down there to see if any leaks were present. No luck. I also had an H-pipe installed which without having the connection welded, the band clamp install is not the greatest and thought maybe I caused this. But it is absolutely there. But it does go away very quickly. Now that you have the same thing I'm not worried. I just add it to the defects the car has. Like the my disgusting wrinkled stripes under my faulty hood scoop that I can't find or trust a competant person to fix/install them.

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You know whats funny, when I read the title to this thread I said to myself,"Could this be the same thing i'm hearing". My car has 300 miles on it and everytime I get a chance to take my car around the block, I start it, open the hood to take off the trickle charger and I hear the same loud ticking. It sounds just like the old days when the aftermarket headers leaked. It does however go away after about 30sec. I stuck my hand down there to see if any leaks were present. No luck. I also had an H-pipe installed which without having the connection welded, the band clamp install is not the greatest and thought maybe I caused this. But it is absolutely there. But it does go away very quickly. Now that you have the same thing I'm not worried. I just add it to the defects the car has. Like the my disgusting wrinkled stripes under my faulty hood scoop that I can't find or trust a competant person to fix/install them.

 

Just courious...why the H pipe?

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You know whats funny, when I read the title to this thread I said to myself,"Could this be the same thing i'm hearing". My car has 300 miles on it and everytime I get a chance to take my car around the block, I start it, open the hood to take off the trickle charger and I hear the same loud ticking. It sounds just like the old days when the aftermarket headers leaked. It does however go away after about 30sec. I stuck my hand down there to see if any leaks were present. No luck. I also had an H-pipe installed which without having the connection welded, the band clamp install is not the greatest and thought maybe I caused this. But it is absolutely there. But it does go away very quickly. Now that you have the same thing I'm not worried. I just add it to the defects the car has. Like the my disgusting wrinkled stripes under my faulty hood scoop that I can't find or trust a competant person to fix/install them.

 

Just courious...why the H pipe?

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