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storage - what to do and how to prepare?


sherpa

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might leave on a business trip and won't be home for 8 month. i will be storing the car in a locked garage. the weather of the storage place will be between 50 to 75 degrees.

 

can i please get tips on what to do and how to prepare?

 

also when i come back 8 month later, what should i do then?

 

thank you

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Put in fresh oil, run it (drive) long enough to heat soak it, fill tank after adding "Staybil" fuel stabilizer or simular product and run for another ten minutes or so, inflate tires if down, put on jack stands, throw a couple of bags of desicant in the car on a sheet of tin foil (couple in the passenger compartment and one or so in the trunk), cover and keep your comprehensive insurance.

 

When you get back, change the oil, remove the desicant, check the tires and drive.

 

Or just give the keys to your (fill in the blank) and let them take care of it. :hysterical:

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also hook up a battery tender trickle charger for the battery,it is an all automatic unit.

if you dont,car will not start. :doh:

stabil fuel additive with a full tank of gas (run car 5 to 10 minutes before storage or put it in the tank before your final fill up at the pump).

i change my oil after it sits over the winter,this way before you drive it,the motor is ready to go with fresh oil.

i think changing the oil before and after storage is a little over kill with the synthetic blends.

also i do not ever use jack stands on any of my cars,just leave the car sitting on the ground,i have been doing this since 1984 and never had problems with my tires.

 

all 4 of my cars get this treatment every year, IMO if it works for me it will work for you!

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also hook up a battery tender trickle charger for the battery,it is an all automatic unit.

if you dont,car will not start. :doh:

stabil fuel additive with a full tank of gas (run car 5 to 10 minutes before storage or put it in the tank before your final fill up at the pump).

i change my oil after it sits over the winter,this way before you drive it,the motor is ready to go with fresh oil.

i think changing the oil before and after storage is a little over kill with the synthetic blends.

also i do not ever use jack stands on any of my cars,just leave the car sitting on the ground,i have been doing this since 1984 and never had problems with my tires.

 

all 4 of my cars get this treatment every year, IMO if it works for me it will work for you!

 

I agree that oil change before and after storage are probably overkill, however, these cars have a 5 year powertrain warranty, and the owners manual dictates every 6 months. I would go annual on the oil changes, but I don't want any risk for a warranty claim denial...

 

I never use jack stands either. Sometimes the tires ride alittle rough for the first few miles, but they smooth out pretty quick.

 

I have always tried to start and run the car until fully warm, about once per month, but for all I know, that may do more damage than good. I have heard this argued back and forth...

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Agree with all here with a few minor adjustment IMO.

 

1. Fuel stablizer. Run your tank low, put the solution in the tank at the gas station, then fill it up and drive it home.

 

2. Battery trickle charger. As stated, that's a must.

 

3. Oil. Whether you decide to change it before you shut the car down for the 8 months, you should definately change it BEFORE you start the car after the 8 months. I would also disconnect the ignition module (or do something else so the engine won't start) so you can turn the car over for about 15 to 20 seconds before you allow the engine to run. What I am essentially trying to say is turn the car over so the oil pump has a chance to prime and push oil up into the oil galleys and supercharger before you actually start the engine.

 

4. Don't put the car on jack stands because you will run the risk of the suspension being sagged when you get back. I suggest that you over inflate the tires by about 10 Lbs and just let them sit on the ground. If you really want to put the car up on jack stands, then I would remove the wheels off of the car in order to take the load off of the suspension components so they don't sag.

 

5. Desicant (mosture remover). Considering where you live Iz, using that stuff is also a must just like Ford Blue Blood says. I would also put your vent control in the off position, but drop your windows down about two inches. That's because the felt in the upper window seal could adheare itself to the glass after 8 months of sitting, and because you want the leather in the seats to breath too.

 

6. Leather surfaces. Apply a good coat of Lexol's leather conditioner onto all of the leather surfaces and allow it to wick in. It is a skin after all, and should be mosturized just like skin.

 

7. Car cover. If you don't have one already, you should definately invest in a good car cover that breathes. Don't buy or use the one size fits all car cover that you can buy at Costco or Target, instead get yourself a custom fit cover that will run you a few hundred dollars or so.

 

8. Wiper blades. Pull the wiper arms up and off of the glass so they are freestanding. That will keep the blades from flattening out on the windshield.

 

I think that about covers it all.

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Did you all notice... he said he would be gone for 8 months? If you do not put you car on jack stands your tires will probabably be permanently flat spotted when you get back. I know this from experience. I got into a bad motorcycle accident when I was 22 and I was in the hospital for 7 months; two months after I got out I was barely strong enough to drive my car '86 GT convertible. But, at any rate it sat for 9 months total and the brand new tires i had put on it 9 months early were permantely flat spotted. I even took the tires to have them shaved thinking tht would fix it but to no avail.

 

YES, DO put it on jack stands. Don't know what some of you are talkin about... that the suspension will sag. You do realize that there are two ways to have your car on the stands? unloaded suspension and loaded suspension

 

1. unloaded: put the jack stands under the body... this WILL UNLOAD the suspension and your suspension will hang- this I would NOT recommend.

 

2. loaded: put the jack stands under the rear axle... this WILL LOAD the susepension.. same as the car sitting on its tires. for the front put the jack stands as far out as possible [outward from the k-memeber] under the front control arms. if you need to take the tires off then do so. This will keep the front suspension loaded as if it were siting on the tires. after you get it up like this push down on the front and back of the car just to make sure the suspensions is compressed.

 

I went to Japan this summer, it was only for 3 months and I went ahead and put my car up on jack stands - with the suspension loaded. I don't want to take any chance flat spotting tires again.

 

and yes you want to change you're oil BEFORE you go. Old oil in your engine is acidic and has other impurities in it. you don't want that oil sitting in your engine for 8 months. so put fresh oil in as stated above. As far as changing it when you get back before you start it up... thats personal preference.. personally I don't think it will matter one way or the other .

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All good points. Had mine sitting for 5 months, and had my brother start her about once a week or two. No issues. No tire flat spots. Sat on the ground. I did have him lower one window about 5 inches, in the event he didn't make it down, and the battery died. Windows raise and lower about 1/2" when opening and closing the door. Just a thought depending on what you do with the battery. Windows up..dead battery...not a good thing.

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I disagree with placing jack stands under the suspension components and FoMoCo agrees. Also, placing jack stands under the differental banjo housing could cause it to bow over time, also not recommended by FoMoCo; hell they don't even want you to jack the car up by the banjo housing. Over inflating the tires by 10 lbs will cause them to crown, and when you bring them back down to the proper pressure, they will not have any flat spots on them.

 

Having old oil sitting in the bottom of the pan will not be an issue just as long as you drain it and change it before you run the engine again.

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sorry but where do u buy this "Staybil" "Fuel stabilizer" and "desicant"?

 

if i totally disconnect the battery, and reconnect after 6-8 month, is that ok? i hate to plug in anything so no chance of electrical fire or anything. its a home garage and not a self-storage place. btw not my home either lol sooooo i really dont want anything happen.

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sorry but where do u buy this "Staybil" "Fuel stabilizer" and "desicant"?

 

if i totally disconnect the battery, and reconnect after 6-8 month, is that ok? i hate to plug in anything so no chance of electrical fire or anything. its a home garage and not a self-storage place. btw not my home either lol sooooo i really dont want anything happen.

Iz, Staybil is the brand name for the fuel stabilzer solution that you pour into your gas tank. "Desicant gel" is a dry chemical that takes mosture and dampness out of confined spaces such as car interiors, trunks, home closets, etc. It's the stuff that comes in those little pouches that have "DO NOT EAT" printed on them when you buy a new electronic device like a stereo. The manufacturer usually places a few of them inside the packing box in order to keep the electronic components dry during shipping.

 

You can find disicant in most larger hardware stores, and you can find Staybil in most auto parts stores.

 

You can completely disconnect the battery if you like, but there is no guarantee that it won't get run down anyway, and you will have to reprogram your stereo too. With modern, computer controled cars, you would be better off just using a battery trickle charger, and I would not be too concerned about it starting an electrical fire. Many, many, people use them all over the world without any incident.

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I disagree with placing jack stands under the suspension components and FoMoCo agrees. Also, placing jack stands under the differental banjo housing could cause it to bow over time, also not recommended by FoMoCo; hell they don't even want you to jack the car up by the banjo housing. Over inflating the tires by 10 lbs will cause them to crown, and when you bring them back down to the proper pressure, they will not have any flat spots on them.

 

Having old oil sitting in the bottom of the pan will not be an issue just as long as you drain it and change it before you run the engine again.

 

 

 

First, FoMoCo doesn't recommend a lot of things that we do to these cars so the fact that they don't recommend jack stands under suspension components has no validity whatsoever.

Second, never said place the jack stands under the diff housing [don't know how you came up wiht that conclusion]and can't think of anybody that would be that stupid to do that. If for nothing else the car would flip over if you only had a jack stands in the center.

 

You put the jack stands as far out as possible preferably under the control arm mount. Or under the axle tube. Its not rocket science.

 

True most of the oil will be sitting in the pan. but there will still be a film of oil on the rest of the parts in the bearings up in the valve train. Its better to have fresh oil sitting on these parts and in the bearing not oil that has been run in your car for two months that or so. thats why you follw the procedure somebody above posted about putting in new oil and then firing up the car one time. that circulates the new oil on the parts. Now you have fresh oil in and on everything ready for storage.

 

You can buy stabil at Home Depot or any hardware store.

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First, FoMoCo doesn't recommend a lot of things that we do to these cars so the fact that they don't recommend jack stands under suspension components has no validity whatsoever.

Second, never said place the jack stands under the diff housing [don't know how you came up wiht that conclusion]and can't think of anybody that would be that stupid to do that. If for nothing else the car would flip over if you only had a jack stands in the center.

 

You put the jack stands as far out as possible preferably under the control arm mount. Or under the axle tube. Its not rocket science.

 

True most of the oil will be sitting in the pan. but there will still be a film of oil on the rest of the parts in the bearings up in the valve train. Its better to have fresh oil sitting on these parts and in the bearing not oil that has been run in your car for two months that or so. thats why you follw the procedure somebody above posted about putting in new oil and then firing up the car one time. that circulates the new oil on the parts. Now you have fresh oil in and on everything ready for storage.

 

You can buy stabil at Home Depot or any hardware store.

 

I'm not sure why you would recommend placing the jack stands on the suspension parts. Yes, this will eliminate the chance of flat spots on the tires, but does not address suspension sag because the suspension is still loaded just as if it was not on jacks.

 

Jack stands should be on the frame, so the suspension is extended. Some suspension parts don't like to hang completely unsupported, so the jack stands should be set to a height that allows for significant extension of the suspension, but not totally letting it hang free.

 

bt8.jpg

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if i totally disconnect the battery, and reconnect after 6-8 month, is that ok? i hate to plug in anything so no chance of electrical fire or anything. its a home garage and not a self-storage place. btw not my home either lol sooooo i really dont want anything happen.

 

if you totally disconect the battery i would bet it will not work when you put it back on. i run 4 battery tenders in my garage directly hooked up to the battery on the cars.

absolutly no problems whatsoever. my storage on my cars is october to may which is about the same 8 months you are storing. believe me you will not get any problems/fires/acid expolsions etc........

i even have a car over another car on a four post hoist with the 2 gang battery tender runing. they are trickle chargers and will only come on when the battery needs to be charged.

also i dont care what anyone says about the jacks under the car,DO NOT DO IT !

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I'm not sure why you would recommend placing the jack stands on the suspension parts. Yes, this will eliminate the chance of flat spots on the tires, but does not address suspension sag because the suspension is still loaded just as if it was not on jacks.

 

Jack stands should be on the frame, so the suspension is extended. Some suspension parts don't like to hang completely unsupported, so the jack stands should be set to a height that allows for significant extension of the suspension, but not totally letting it hang free.

 

Because putting the jack stands under the suspension is the same as the car sitting on the ground sans for the fact that the tires are no longer touching.

 

You're wrong. Loading the suspension DOES address suspension sag BECAUSE when the suspension is loaded the supension is NOT sagging. Your statement "does not address suspension sag because the suspension is still loaded just as if it was not on jacks" is an oxymoron. You cant have a loaded suspension AND suspension sag at the same time. NOT even in bizarro world. So therefore, YES it IS addressing suspension sag.

 

The only time the suspension sags is WHEN the susspension is unloaded. From what you wrote above it appers you don't understand the differrence between loaded supension and unloaded or suspension sag.

 

When you have jack stands under the body this UNLOADS suspension an the wheels and suspension hang/sag.

 

When the jack stands are under the supension parts or the car is sitting on itS tires on the ground the suspension is LOADED.

 

1. Car sitting with tires on the ground = suspension loaded; supension NOT sagging

2. Car sitting with jack stands under supension = suspension loaded; suspension NOT sagging; tires not on the ground

3. Car sitting with jack stands under the body = suspension unloaded; suspension sagging

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ok i will buy Staybil/fuel stabilizer n trickle charger from auto part store and get the "Desicant gel" from home depo.

 

guess put the car on jack stands is still a debate.

 

by not using jack stands, will the tires be totally flat after 8 month or still get some air in there?

 

and if using a jack stands where the wheels are totally off the ground, will air from the tires leak much?

 

another thought, y dont i just drain da engine oil completely during storage and just put new ones when i am ready to drive after 8 month?

 

the reason i say that is after 8 month of storage and need to change to new oil, how do i drive the car up the ramps to change oil? i gotta start the car right, wouldn't that means the old oil will be reflow on the engine one more coat again?

 

btw, i thank everyone wholeheartedly for their input.

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by not using jack stands, will the tires be totally flat after 8 month or still get some air in there?

just to be clear the point about putting the car on jack stands is to prevent a permanent flat spot in the tires NOT to prevent the tire from going flat [losing air]

 

and if using a jack stands where the wheels are totally off the ground, will air from the tires leak much?

again having the car on jack stands has nothing to do with air leaking. If there's a leak it makes no diff its on jack stands or not. the tire will go flat. However if you do have a slow leak it is would be way better forthe car to be on jack stands rather then coming home 8 months later and see your car with a complete flat sitting on the rim. then you probably for sure will need to buy a new tire.

 

another thought, y dont i just drain da engine oil completely during storage and just put new ones when i am ready to drive after 8 month?

 

 

Because you want to circulate the new oil through the engine before you store it. If you drain the old oil and just leave it you still have a film of the old oil on the parts and on the bearings.

 

 

the reason i say that is after 8 month of storage and need to change to new oil, how do i drive the car up the ramps to change oil? i gotta start the car right, wouldn't that means the old oil will be reflow on the engine one more coat again?

Just because you have ramps doesn't mean that you have to drive your car up them. You can jack your car up, then place the ramp under the tires... lower the jack and abracadabrha!!... you're car is on the ramps. Secondly if you have jack stands you can use those instead of the ramps.

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ok i will buy Staybil/fuel stabilizer n trickle charger from auto part store and get the "Desicant gel" from home depo.

 

guess put the car on jack stands is still a debate.

 

by not using jack stands, will the tires be totally flat after 8 month or still get some air in there?

 

and if using a jack stands where the wheels are totally off the ground, will air from the tires leak much?

 

another thought, y dont i just drain da engine oil completely during storage and just put new ones when i am ready to drive after 8 month?

 

the reason i say that is after 8 month of storage and need to change to new oil, how do i drive the car up the ramps to change oil? i gotta start the car right, wouldn't that means the old oil will be reflow on the engine one more coat again?

 

btw, i thank everyone wholeheartedly for their input.

Iz, Inflate the tires 10 Lbs over and leave it on the ground; much less work and hassle regardless of anything else, and trust me, the tires won't develop any flat spots in 8 months. Whenever you decide to change the oil just make sure to prime the oil pump for at least 15 to 20 seconds before you allow the engine to fire up. Don't dry storage (drain all the oil out) the engine for the 8 months because you might cause the rear engine seal to get dry and leak.

 

Here is a link to the DIY network that tells you everything you need to know about storing your car.

 

http://www.diynetwork.com/diy/ab_exterior/...2272119,00.html

 

Please take note of the TIP that's under storage point #4.

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hey Son of GT that was a great link to read.

i forgot to mention to everyone that running a de-humidifier will also do a great job controlling the humidity in your garage.

i run a de-humidifier in my 4 car garage when i feel the humidity is high during storage and it keeps the garage cool and dry which is perfect for winter storage.i even use it in the summer when the humidity is high.

it is a great unit to have for under $200 and it keeps the air the way it should be in the garage.

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I've been storing cars for about 7-8 months at a time in my garage for years. I've always over inflate the tires, put the tires on something other then the concrete (wood, rubber, whatever), disconnect battery, charge it fully, store in the house, put in a box of baking soda inside (interior and trunk), and cover it. For the GT500 vert, I open the windows a crack (all 4) before I pull the battery of course.

 

The oil change topic has been debated to death, as well as the storing of the car on jack-stands (wherever you decide to put them). I've had flat spots on tires after storage when I didn't overinflate the tires, but never since I started doing that. Putting the car on jackstands has it's own issues...most of which have already been cited. The one that I always fall back on is that the car was designed to support the weight via the wheels. If the weight of the car is being supported anywhere else (even close, but not exactly at the wheels) then the suspension is distributing the weight incorrectly. Who knows how every component is engineered and what stresses are involved. I'm sure this is just as irresponsible speculation as the other reasons for/against (except the official position Ford states), but plain mechanical engineering/statics tells me that it's not a good idea.

 

Also, I do the same for my motorcycle and I just replaced the battery after 11 years of use. The key to battery life is store them charged, and don't let them get drained or freeze.

 

Whatever you do....take a good picture of it at your favorite hangout...and put it on your computer's desktop, phone, or whatever. That way you can keep dreaming of getting back in it and having fun!

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Oh...and a positive for the "dumb" Nav system. After 7 months of having the battery pulled, when I reconnected it all of my waypoints, station presets, and system settings were all still there!

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