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paint stripes or vinyl pros cons


shelby07

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I would bite the bullitt and get a good paint shop to paint them on for you. I've had my GT (car in avatar) for over 2 1/2 years now, and the stripes were painted on as soon as the car arrived at the dealership I work at. Took a week to do, but the results were fantastic!!! To this day, after I wax them, they shine like they were sprayed yesterday. On the hood, roof and trunk, they are smooth to the touch, with no edge. The bumpers have a slight edge (plastic bumper, don't want sand too much and distort it) but thats fine with me. Plus, when you get them painted, the stripes will be run into the license plate area, which looks real good. If you have any questions, please feel free to ask. I was the 1st car that the shop did stripes on and the 1st Mustang around my area with painted ones (everyone went vinyl), and I have NEVER regretted spending the extra money. So worth it, IMO!!! :shift:

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PRO for Painted:

You can WAX over them.

They will not Shrink over Time.

They will not Crack over Time.

If they get a Tree Stain on them, you can Sand & Buff.

If they get Scratched, you can Sand & Buff.

 

Con for Painted:

They did not come that way from the Factory.

 

 

 

Pro for Vinyl:

They came that way from the Factory.

 

Con for Vinyl:

They will Shrink over Time.

They will Crack over Time.

If they get a Tree Stain on them, you can not Sand & Buff.

If they get Scratched, you can not Sand & Buff.

 

 

I perfer Painted on Stripes.

 

David.

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  • 1 month later...
I would bite the bullitt and get a good paint shop to paint them on for you. I've had my GT (car in avatar) for over 2 1/2 years now, and the stripes were painted on as soon as the car arrived at the dealership I work at. Took a week to do, but the results were fantastic!!! To this day, after I wax them, they shine like they were sprayed yesterday. On the hood, roof and trunk, they are smooth to the touch, with no edge. The bumpers have a slight edge (plastic bumper, don't want sand too much and distort it) but thats fine with me. Plus, when you get them painted, the stripes will be run into the license plate area, which looks real good. If you have any questions, please feel free to ask. I was the 1st car that the shop did stripes on and the 1st Mustang around my area with painted ones (everyone went vinyl), and I have NEVER regretted spending the extra money. So worth it, IMO!!! :shift:

 

This is the approach that solves the problem of poor quality stripes that SAI should have done to begin with - just like in '65-'66 - stripes were painted on.

What did you pay to have this effort done 06VistaBlue?

 

Those who have stripe issues are doomed to deal with the basic Ford warrantee - replace like for like until the warrantee runs out in 3 years from date of purchase.

 

I just got speaking with Drew Ford body shop in So Cal. They won't perform any warrantee work on the hood scoop or stripe replacement for non customer purchasers - I didn't buy it from them, yet they are closest to me. Reason being I'm told is that the SAI/Ford warrantee process is very difficult to deal with and that the previous repairs they have made reveal poor quality stripes ultimately resulting in no one being happy - except SAI - who has dodged another bullet until the warrantee runs out. This leaves second owners like me (bought from original owner in Sept '07 w/ 5k miles) shafted as a result.

 

The problem with the stripes is that they are a very poor quality vinyl. It is only 4 mil thick. The backing paper on the stripe sticker is 6 mil?!?

 

My car just turned 15k miles and is parked indoors and driven hard regularly. The original Owner bought the protection coating provided by the dealer (Xzilon) and the stripes still look pretty good. In fact, the body shop estimator who has dealt with other SGTs said these were the best he's seen - and my car is a March '07 (#0076). I keep it clean and waxed, but I now know that in a few years the stripes will start deteriorating and I'll be stuck having to buy the better 3M stripes that are 10 or 12 mil and will be of a much higher quality.

 

To me this is total BS. By going with the low bid vendor, SAI can ride through the 3 year warrantee process and then sell better replacements to Owners (maybe non Owners too - bad for owners) and make even more $$.

 

Ironically for me, this issue is only fully exposed due to the poor quality hood scoops. The replacement hood scoops are rivited to the hood which results in more clamping force but exhasperates the poor stripe issue since they wrinkle and deform easily under this increased load - a vicious cycle with no end in site.

 

At this point I think that the right solution is to get a good quality hood scoop that rivits to the hood and use a high quality stripe.

 

What I would really like is a functional scoop a la Mach 1. I think that SAI should offer a hood swap out program with air intake change over parts for a discount.

 

I'm tired of explaining to people that $200 worth of parts and another $720 (8 @ $90) for labor is the source of a major problem that detracts from the car's value and reeks of a poor quality product. This is why I am curious how mcuh extra you paid for painted stripes.

 

The current hood scoop amounts to a bird turd on the top of a wedding cake for me.

 

Sorry for the rant, but this is fresh.

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I just got speaking with Drew Ford body shop in So Cal. They won't perform any warrantee work on the hood scoop or stripe replacement for non customer purchasers - I didn't buy it from them, yet they are closest to me.

 

Unless things have changed that is a violation of their franchise agreement with Ford. They can not pick and choose warranty items.

 

Now on the other hand its probably best not to use a dealership that doesn't want to do the repair. I can't picture the quality being that good with the attitiude they have.

 

Just my 2

 

Steve

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I have a question. If a dealer screws up your stripe install, does that same dealer have to make another claim with Shelby for the replacement stripes, or can another dealer repair the first dealers screw-up? It is my understanding that Shelby will only send one set of stripes at THEIR expense. After that, it is the responsibily of the dealer to flip the bill. So I would be surprised if another dealer would do the work.

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PRO for Painted:

You can WAX over them.

They will not Shrink over Time.

They will not Crack over Time.

If they get a Tree Stain on them, you can Sand & Buff.

If they get Scratched, you can Sand & Buff.

 

Con for Painted:

They did not come that way from the Factory.

 

 

 

Pro for Vinyl:

They came that way from the Factory.

 

Con for Vinyl:

They will Shrink over Time.

They will Crack over Time.

If they get a Tree Stain on them, you can not Sand & Buff.

If they get Scratched, you can not Sand & Buff.

 

 

I perfer Painted on Stripes.

 

David.

 

David,

Yes paint is best, but costly. I just got turned on to the following Company that has what appears to be a good alternative, ACI Paintfilm in Tulsa, OK http://www.wrapwithpaint.com/paintfilm.htm

I just ordered a catalog with a sample to check it out.

2 mil vinyl with 3 mil of clearcoat. Warrantee for 5 years in horizontal position. Looks like a superior product. I'll let you know. Oh and it costs $320 for a set die cut including down over the bumpers. They claim you can buff and polish just like paint.

Does anyone out there have any of these brand?

MR

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David,

Yes paint is best, but costly. I just got turned on to the following Company that has what appears to be a good alternative, ACI Paintfilm in Tulsa, OK http://www.wrapwithpaint.com/paintfilm.htm

I just ordered a catalog with a sample to check it out.

2 mil vinyl with 3 mil of clearcoat. Warrantee for 5 years in horizontal position. Looks like a superior product. I'll let you know. Oh and it costs $320 for a set die cut including down over the bumpers. They claim you can buff and polish just like paint.

Does anyone out there have any of these brand?

MR

 

I have ACI paint film on my Super Snake hood.It's an excellent product and color match.

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1....just like in '65-'66 - stripes were painted on.

 

2....Ironically for me, this issue is only fully exposed due to the poor quality hood scoops. The replacement hood scoops are rivited to the hood which results in more clamping force but exhasperates the poor stripe issue since they wrinkle and deform easily under this increased load - a vicious cycle with no end in site.

 

3....At this point I think that the right solution is to get a good quality hood scoop that rivits to the hood and use a high quality stripe.

 

4....What I would really like is a functional scoop a la Mach 1. I think that SAI should offer a hood swap out program with air intake change over parts for a discount.

 

5....I'm tired of explaining to people that $200 worth of parts and another $720 (8 @ $90) for labor is the source of a major problem that detracts from the car's value and reeks of a poor quality product. This is why I am curious how mcuh extra you paid for painted stripes.

 

6....The current hood scoop amounts to a bird turd on the top of a wedding cake for me.

 

mrichards,

 

I don't know if you've followed my thread "Absolute Hood Scoop Final Fix" in the Shelby GT section of the Team Shelby forum. The solution you seek is available but is not covered under warranty. A ton of research and information is contained in the thread referenced above but I will briefly address each of your points here.

 

1. In 65 and 66 the stripes were painted on, some by Shelby American. But many 65 and 66 GT350s were built and delivered without any stripes over the top of the car. Owners had the guardsmen blue stripes painted on their cars after the fact. This does not detract much, if at all, from the value of the aftermarket painted cars today. The hood scoop was open on those cars but it was not plumbed down onto the air cleaner, it was simply open into the engine compartment.

 

2. Your comment here is spot on. The original Shelby GT hood scoop was constructed of soft bumper cover material that expanded, contracted, and warped quite a bit with changes in temperature. When riveted down to the hood it would pull and push on those thin vinyl stripes as it expanded and contracted, damaging the stripes. The riveted installation not only makes it impossible to modulate the amount of force used to attach the scoop, it makes it impossible to remove that scoop if the stripes ever need to be replaced without drilling out those rivets which will certainly damage the scoop.

 

3. I had a new hood scoop built out of vinyl-ester resin fiberglass. It is not attached to the hood using rivets, it is attached using rivets nuts and domed top set screws that allow it to be attached with just enough force and also make it easily removable. The stripes on my hood are painted on to eliminate any problem there.

 

4. My scoop is functional à la 1966 Shelby GT350. SAI will not cover any part of this modification, nor should they be expected to.

 

5. I paid approximately $800 to have the stripes painted on my hood, I paid $200 to have my hood scoop painted, and it cost $700 to have Phoenix Composites build an aviation grade vinylester resin fiberglass hood scoop that will withstand temperatures up to 400° and supply me with the hardware to attach it. I can't remember what it cost me to have the hole cut in my hood, but it wasn't much. This maintains the original look of my car and is cheaper than buying, finishing, and painting a CS6 hood.

 

6. I love the Shelby GT. I like it better than my GT500. But the flawed scoop in the middle of the hood directly in my line of sight as I drove the car was like a big zit on the tip of the nose of a beautiful girl. It may not have impaired her function, but it certainly was distracting. Now, with a perfect, smooth, and open hood scoop that looks exactly as it should......all is right with the world!!!! I did not expect or ask for my warranty to pay for this. I'm happy to have this issue behind me.

 

Chip

 

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post-12804-1223746815_thumb.jpg

post-12804-1223746826_thumb.jpg

post-12804-1223746836_thumb.jpg

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mrichards,

 

I don't know if you've followed my thread "Absolute Hood Scoop Final Fix" in the Shelby GT section of the Team Shelby forum. The solution you seek is available but is not covered under warranty. A ton of research and information is contained in the thread referenced above but I will briefly address each of your points here.

 

1. In 65 and 66 the stripes were painted on, some by Shelby American. But many 65 and 66 GT350s were built and delivered without any stripes over the top of the car. Owners had the guardsmen blue stripes painted on their cars after the fact. This does not detract much, if at all, from the value of the aftermarket painted cars today. The hood scoop was open on those cars but it was not plumbed down onto the air cleaner, it was simply open into the engine compartment.

 

2. Your comment here is spot on. The original Shelby GT hood scoop was constructed of soft bumper cover material that expanded, contracted, and warped quite a bit with changes in temperature. When riveted down to the hood it would pull and push on those thin vinyl stripes as it expanded and contracted, damaging the stripes. The riveted installation not only makes it impossible to modulate the amount of force used to attach the scoop, it makes it impossible to remove that scoop if the stripes ever need to be replaced without drilling out those rivets which will certainly damage the scoop.

 

3. I had a new hood scoop built out of vinyl-ester resin fiberglass. It is not attached to the hood using rivets, it is attached using rivets nuts and domed top set screws that allow it to be attached with just enough force and also make it easily removable. The stripes on my hood are painted on to eliminate any problem there.

 

4. My scoop is functional à la 1966 Shelby GT350. SAI will not cover any part of this modification, nor should they be expected to.

 

5. I paid approximately $800 to have the stripes painted on my hood, I paid $200 to have my hood scoop painted, and it cost $700 to have Phoenix Composites build an aviation grade vinylester resin fiberglass hood scoop that will withstand temperatures up to 400° and supply me with the hardware to attach it. I can't remember what it cost me to have the hole cut in my hood, but it wasn't much. This maintains the original look of my car and is cheaper than buying, finishing, and painting a CS6 hood.

 

6. I love the Shelby GT. I like it better than my GT500. But the flawed scoop in the middle of the hood directly in my line of sight as I drove the car was like a big zit on the tip of the nose of a beautiful girl. It may not have impaired her function, but it certainly was distracting. Now, with a perfect, smooth, and open hood scoop that looks exactly as it should......all is right with the world!!!! I did not expect or ask for my warranty to pay for this. I'm happy to have this issue behind me.

 

Chip

 

Scoop_22.jpg

Scoop_44.jpg

C_S_Scoop_4.jpg

C_S_Scoop_5.jpg

C_S_Scoop_6.jpg

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mrichards,

 

I don't know if you've followed my thread "Absolute Hood Scoop Final Fix" in the Shelby GT section of the Team Shelby forum. The solution you seek is available but is not covered under warranty. A ton of research and information is contained in the thread referenced above but I will briefly address each of your points here.

 

1. In 65 and 66 the stripes were painted on, some by Shelby American. But many 65 and 66 GT350s were built and delivered without any stripes over the top of the car. Owners had the guardsmen blue stripes painted on their cars after the fact. This does not detract much, if at all, from the value of the aftermarket painted cars today. The hood scoop was open on those cars but it was not plumbed down onto the air cleaner, it was simply open into the engine compartment.

 

2. Your comment here is spot on. The original Shelby GT hood scoop was constructed of soft bumper cover material that expanded, contracted, and warped quite a bit with changes in temperature. When riveted down to the hood it would pull and push on those thin vinyl stripes as it expanded and contracted, damaging the stripes. The riveted installation not only makes it impossible to modulate the amount of force used to attach the scoop, it makes it impossible to remove that scoop if the stripes ever need to be replaced without drilling out those rivets which will certainly damage the scoop.

 

3. I had a new hood scoop built out of vinyl-ester resin fiberglass. It is not attached to the hood using rivets, it is attached using rivets nuts and domed top set screws that allow it to be attached with just enough force and also make it easily removable. The stripes on my hood are painted on to eliminate any problem there.

 

4. My scoop is functional à la 1966 Shelby GT350. SAI will not cover any part of this modification, nor should they be expected to.

 

5. I paid approximately $800 to have the stripes painted on my hood, I paid $200 to have my hood scoop painted, and it cost $700 to have Phoenix Composites build an aviation grade vinylester resin fiberglass hood scoop that will withstand temperatures up to 400° and supply me with the hardware to attach it. I can't remember what it cost me to have the hole cut in my hood, but it wasn't much. This maintains the original look of my car and is cheaper than buying, finishing, and painting a CS6 hood.

 

6. I love the Shelby GT. I like it better than my GT500. But the flawed scoop in the middle of the hood directly in my line of sight as I drove the car was like a big zit on the tip of the nose of a beautiful girl. It may not have impaired her function, but it certainly was distracting. Now, with a perfect, smooth, and open hood scoop that looks exactly as it should......all is right with the world!!!! I did not expect or ask for my warranty to pay for this. I'm happy to have this issue behind me.

 

Chip

 

 

Chip.

 

Thanks for the feedback and comments. I've had trouble navigating all of the hood scoop threads trying to find out current info. I'll check it out.

 

You're fix is really nice. When they painted your stripes I assume that they removed the windshield washer squiters too right?

 

I am a little suprised that you like the SGT better than your GT500?!? Why?

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You're fix is really nice. When they painted your stripes I assume that they removed the windshield washer squiters too right?

 

I am a little suprised that you like the SGT better than your GT500?!? Why?

 

mrichards,

 

Yes, the windshield washer nozzels were removed before the hood was painted and the hood was removed from the car as well.

 

To answer your second question I have cut and pasted a post I wrote a few weeks ago.

 

____________________________________________________________

 

Gentlemen,

 

Most GT500 owners have never driven a Shelby GT. Most Shelby GT owners have probably never driven a GT500. And I would venture to say that only a handful of GT500 owners have driven a Shelby GT/SC. I have driven 6000 miles in a normally aspirated Shelby GT, over 1000 miles in my now Whipple supercharged Shelby GT, and not quite 1000 miles in my stock 2009 GT500. I love both cars and spent the money to buy both cars so I think I can be pretty objective here. SGT/SC or GT500? It's not even close. My SGT/SC significantly outperforms my GT500 in every area except maximum horsepower potential. Handling...... it's no contest here. When I get out of my Shelby GT and get into my GT500 it feels like I'm driving a Crown Victoria. Braking.......the stock brakes on my Shelby GT are more confidence inspiring than the big Brembos on the GT500 as they don't need to contend with the huge nosedive, soft suspension, and front weight bias of the 500. I'm sure the Brembos would fade less under hard usage. Acceleration.....the SGT/SC pulls harder, especially at low RPMs. Throttle response is also much quicker on my SGT/SC. Feel and feedback.....again, no contest. The SGT/SC hands down. The stock shifter in the GT500 feels vague and rubbery, the shifter on the Shelby GT is positive and precise. Steering inputs yield immediate response on my SGT, the same input on my GT500 takes awhile for the message to get through the soft suspension to the tires. Appearance.....this is purely subjective but to me, the SGT is the better looking car.

 

Reading all of this one might think that I don't like the GT500 and that's not the case. I like it a lot and it's bulletproof forged internals will allow some future massive horsepower increases. I just don't like it quite as much as I like the Shelby GT. If I could only keep one, the GT500 would go. Having both cars I will not be spending time modifying my Shelby GT to make it more like a GT500. I will be spending time modifying my GT500 to make it feel and drive more like a Shelby GT.

 

A classic parallel to my experience here is the experience of Shelby American when they introduced the 427 Cobra. That car never enjoyed the success on the race track that the 289 comp cars did. The bigger engine appeared to screw up the balance and handling of the little Cobra and even the finest drivers like Ken Miles had a difficult time keeping them on the track. In the same way, the lightweight aluminum block 4.6L V-8 most definitely makes the Mustang a better balanced and better handling car. Even with considerable suspension modifications I don't see my GT500 ever handling as well as my SGT.

 

Finally, a real intangible. I have owned a number of supercars including my current 650 HP Ford GT. Genuine supercars have a feel all their own. My Whipple equipped Shelby GT feels, responds, and accelerates like a supercar. My GT500 does not.

 

Shelby enthusiasts who have not driven the Shelby GT are missing a bet. Right now there are still brand-new Shelby GTs languishing on dealership lots at huge discounts. The six original Cobra Daytona Coupe's sat outside at Shelby American for a year and a half before he could finally offload them at a huge discount for $7,000 apiece. A whole lot of us missed a bet on those as well 'eh!

 

Chip

 

post-12804-1223959864_thumb.jpg

 

______________________________________________________________________________

post-12804-1223959864_thumb.jpg

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This is the approach that solves the problem of poor quality stripes that SAI should have done to begin with - just like in '65-'66 - stripes were painted on.

What did you pay to have this effort done 06VistaBlue?

 

 

Hey bud, sorry for the delay. I work at a Ford dealer (I'm in sales there, been there for 12 years and am only 32). The body shop we use for warranty work, and such, did my stripes. He never did a set before, so it was done as cash, and he did a **** good job. I paid $1,000 for it, and this included painting and installing a Street Scenes Ducktail spoiler as well. He removed the bumpers, hood and trunk lid and painted them all after the stripes were masked off. Once they were done, he masked the ducktail spoiler and installed that as well. The lines are perfect. Then he sanded them smooth and cleared them. Only hints of an edge are on the bumpers (which have been redone due to an driver who rear-ended me and myself doing something stupid, like forget to set the E-Brake, and damaging the paint there. You can't even feel the stripes on the roof and hood. When I wax the car, they come out fantastic!!! Its well worth the effort to do, and if your gonna hold onto your car forever, paint is definitely the way to go. :nice:

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Hey bud, sorry for the delay. I work at a Ford dealer (I'm in sales there, been there for 12 years and am only 32). The body shop we use for warranty work, and such, did my stripes. He never did a set before, so it was done as cash, and he did a **** good job. I paid $1,000 for it, and this included painting and installing a Street Scenes Ducktail spoiler as well. He removed the bumpers, hood and trunk lid and painted them all after the stripes were masked off. Once they were done, he masked the ducktail spoiler and installed that as well. The lines are perfect. Then he sanded them smooth and cleared them. Only hints of an edge are on the bumpers (which have been redone due to an driver who rear-ended me and myself doing something stupid, like forget to set the E-Brake, and damaging the paint there. You can't even feel the stripes on the roof and hood. When I wax the car, they come out fantastic!!! Its well worth the effort to do, and if your gonna hold onto your car forever, paint is definitely the way to go. :nice:

 

06 -

Thanks for the info. To clarify - you had the vinyl stripes removed first, then painted on stripes right?

 

I got the samples back from ACI and they look great. They are 6 mil (w.o the backing) and look way better than mine do on the car.

 

Based on what I'm reading here, it seems like one may as well get them painted on as repalcing them twice over the car's life would more than cover the painting costs.

 

I'm going to get the Phoenix Comp sccop too - thanks Chip!

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mrichards,

 

Yes, the windshield washer nozzels were removed before the hood was painted and the hood was removed from the car as well.

 

To answer your second question I have cut and pasted a post I wrote a few weeks ago.

 

____________________________________________________________

 

Gentlemen,

 

Most GT500 owners have never driven a Shelby GT. Most Shelby GT owners have probably never driven a GT500. And I would venture to say that only a handful of GT500 owners have driven a Shelby GT/SC. I have driven 6000 miles in a normally aspirated Shelby GT, over 1000 miles in my now Whipple supercharged Shelby GT, and not quite 1000 miles in my stock 2009 GT500. I love both cars and spent the money to buy both cars so I think I can be pretty objective here. SGT/SC or GT500? It's not even close. My SGT/SC significantly outperforms my GT500 in every area except maximum horsepower potential. Handling...... it's no contest here. When I get out of my Shelby GT and get into my GT500 it feels like I'm driving a Crown Victoria. Braking.......the stock brakes on my Shelby GT are more confidence inspiring than the big Brembos on the GT500 as they don't need to contend with the huge nosedive, soft suspension, and front weight bias of the 500. I'm sure the Brembos would fade less under hard usage. Acceleration.....the SGT/SC pulls harder, especially at low RPMs. Throttle response is also much quicker on my SGT/SC. Feel and feedback.....again, no contest. The SGT/SC hands down. The stock shifter in the GT500 feels vague and rubbery, the shifter on the Shelby GT is positive and precise. Steering inputs yield immediate response on my SGT, the same input on my GT500 takes awhile for the message to get through the soft suspension to the tires. Appearance.....this is purely subjective but to me, the SGT is the better looking car.

 

Reading all of this one might think that I don't like the GT500 and that's not the case. I like it a lot and it's bulletproof forged internals will allow some future massive horsepower increases. I just don't like it quite as much as I like the Shelby GT. If I could only keep one, the GT500 would go. Having both cars I will not be spending time modifying my Shelby GT to make it more like a GT500. I will be spending time modifying my GT500 to make it feel and drive more like a Shelby GT.

 

A classic parallel to my experience here is the experience of Shelby American when they introduced the 427 Cobra. That car never enjoyed the success on the race track that the 289 comp cars did. The bigger engine appeared to screw up the balance and handling of the little Cobra and even the finest drivers like Ken Miles had a difficult time keeping them on the track. In the same way, the lightweight aluminum block 4.6L V-8 most definitely makes the Mustang a better balanced and better handling car. Even with considerable suspension modifications I don't see my GT500 ever handling as well as my SGT.

 

Finally, a real intangible. I have owned a number of supercars including my current 650 HP Ford GT. Genuine supercars have a feel all their own. My Whipple equipped Shelby GT feels, responds, and accelerates like a supercar. My GT500 does not.

 

Shelby enthusiasts who have not driven the Shelby GT are missing a bet. Right now there are still brand-new Shelby GTs languishing on dealership lots at huge discounts. The six original Cobra Daytona Coupe's sat outside at Shelby American for a year and a half before he could finally offload them at a huge discount for $7,000 apiece. A whole lot of us missed a bet on those as well 'eh!

 

Chip

 

 

 

 

Chip,

 

Great write up. Interesting comparo and makes me like my SGT more! This car handles a sideways drift at speed very nice and predictable - sweet.

Your stable looks pretty complete. When it's car run time, how do you choose which one to take out?!?

 

 

Mark

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06 -

Thanks for the info. To clarify - you had the vinyl stripes removed first, then painted on stripes right?

 

I got the samples back from ACI and they look great. They are 6 mil (w.o the backing) and look way better than mine do on the car.

 

Based on what I'm reading here, it seems like one may as well get them painted on as repalcing them twice over the car's life would more than cover the painting costs.

 

I'm going to get the Phoenix Comp sccop too - thanks Chip!

 

Hey Mark, I never had vinyl stripes. When I ordered my 2006 GT, painted stripes were my only opiton. When it arrived, it went directly to the body shop after PDI at my dealership I work at, and they painted the stripes on. I never wanted to deal with vinyl stripes, since I plan on keeping my car forever, and wanted them painted, so I could wax them, and I wouldn't have any fade issues that go on with vinyl.

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Chip,

 

Great write up. Interesting comparo and makes me like my SGT more! This car handles a sideways drift at speed very nice and predictable - sweet.

Your stable looks pretty complete. When it's car run time, how do you choose which one to take out?!?

 

Mark

 

If it's a Ford GT event, I drive the GT. If it's a Cobra event, I drive the Cobra. I occasionally drive the GT500 to give it some exercise. If I just want to go out and have a good time driving my favorite car, I take out the Shelby GT/SC. The GT/SC is a blast because everybody is stunned about how fast it is. Light weight, high horsepower, great balance, and 4 seats with a trunk, cupholder, and great stereo! It's harder to enjoy the Ford GT, especially in traffic. People are always rushing up behind and beside it to get a better look and I'm afraid one of Arizona's 1 million uninsured illegal aliens will rearend it. It's easier to enjoy the Shelby GT.

 

Chip

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