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Heated Garage


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I have been told to never use a propane forced air heater to heat my garage because it will cause my car to rust faster and if I should heat my garage use a natrual gas furnace heater.

 

Can anyone confirm this or have further comments?

 

 

I dont know why this would cause more humidity in the air or some other reason it would cause more rusting then other heating methods? But I can offer a comment from my buddy here at work who has a two car garage in NY state and he races snowmobles in the quartermile and his garage is set up as a shop. heats it with propane and has had no issues with rusting of items stored in the garage.

Keith

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I have been told to never use a propane forced air heater to heat my garage because it will cause my car to rust faster and if I should heat my garage use a natrual gas furnace heater.

 

Can anyone confirm this or have further comments?

Propane puts out a moist heat thus causing humidity which will cause metal to rust.

Where as natural gas is a dry heat and you have to have a humidifier

in your home to put moisture back in the air.

Hope this helps

Ron

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I have been told to never use a propane forced air heater to heat my garage because it will cause my car to rust faster and if I should heat my garage use a natrual gas furnace heater.

 

Can anyone confirm this or have further comments?

 

MY NEIGHBOR IS A DEALER AND COLLECTOR AND HE'S GOT VERY SERIOUS CARS AND HE HAS USED PROPANE FOR AT LEAST 15 YEARS AND NO PROBLEM. HE HAS 6 CARS DOUBLE STACKED AND 4 SINGLES AND IS ADDING ON TO GIVE HIM 3 MORE STALLS. WE DON'T HAVE MUCH HUMIDITY HERE BUT IF THE HEAT IS RUNNING IT WOULDN'T MAKE ANY DIFFERENCE. SOUNDS LIKE AN OLD WIVES TALE TO ME.

 

BOB

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I have been told to never use a propane forced air heater to heat my garage because it will cause my car to rust faster and if I should heat my garage use a natrual gas furnace heater.

 

Can anyone confirm this or have further comments?

 

 

For short time work I just use a kerosene heater. It will run for several hours and heats my three car garage fine.

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If the car (and all of its underneath parts as well as the inside of the exhaust pipes) is clean, dry, and free from any type of corrosion accelerants (salt etc), heat should be no issue what so ever. The reason why this story continues is that most of us put our daily drivers away (many times at least) wet and caked with salt. Under that condition, you are better with cold than with heat.

 

That corrosion engineering course I was forced to take 30 years ago sure came in handy just now :hysterical2:

 

..first time, in what 30 years.... :superhero:

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pffffft

 

I have one of those airplane jet engined kerosene heaters and if it does anything, it dries up moisture. I live in NY so we get our share of humidity and in the winter in my detached garage, i sometimes have condensation in the garage on stuff like the snap-on tool box and tools. The heater would dry it while it's running. I wish i could maintain a temp of 52 degrees throughout the winter. Perhaps when i re-do my garage, i'll install some type of permanent heating system.

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I think it would depend on the heater used. I have a large unit heater running on propane. The exhaust gas exits through a flue to the exterior, air passes over the heat exchanger much like a gas furnace in your home. No moisture or rust problems. Now if you ran a propane infrared or force air where the burnt gases are expelled with the heat into your garage, that may add moisture and cause rust. :redcard:

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Cool thanks for the good info. Keep em comming if you have more info. So far I am thinking that overall there is no factual evidence proving that using a propane forced air heater will cause a car to rust any faster.

 

 

Neither propane nor natural gas forced air heaters (they type with a flue) will add ANY net moisture to the room being heated.

 

BOTH propane and natural gas DIRECT VENT heaters will add LOTS of moisture to the space being heated. Up north, the propane would be worse as the NG is dried to a much lower dewpoint for pipelines going north so they do not freeze regulator valves where the pressure drops are taken.

 

A kerosene heater will not add any significant moisture either. I would not want ANY of the direct vent type units in an enclosed garage space do to the oxygen depletion and carbon monoxide issues.

 

Let me know if I can be of any other help with this...HVAC engineering is something I am called on to do from time to time.

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My garage is insulated, so I don't need a serious heater. A small electirc oil radiator works just fine - keeps it in the 70s. Also keeps the house more efficiently heated since I'm no longer introducing a cold room into the house. JC makes a good point for the CO alone...

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I have been told to never use a propane forced air heater to heat my garage because it will cause my car to rust faster and if I should heat my garage use a natrual gas furnace heater.

 

Can anyone confirm this or have further comments?

 

 

The fuel you use will have no effect on the humidity of the building

 

The type of unit you use will.

 

 

There is this marketing term

"Vent Free"

"Ventless"

"Non Ventented" Ect Ect Ect

 

Its a marketing term thats all

 

When ever you here the term just think room vented, meaning the by products of burning a fossil fuel are left inside the room or building the unit is located in .Those types of units ABSOLUTELY make a ton of moisture and leave in the the area trying to be heated

 

Then depending on how oxyegen deprived the unit may be at any given point ,or how dirty the unit is burning at a certain time will depend

on how much and what type of moisture the unit will leave in the space its trying to heat. The moisture left behind in the heated space could be a very corrosive moisture ready to start eating metal products.

 

Always use a vented unit, always install the vented unit in a proper location , in a garage most states require a units burner chamber to located at least 18" off the floor to avoide an explosion from heavey flamable gases left near floor level

 

The best unit to install is also a unit that uses outside air for combustion

 

I am a mecanical contractor and use a "Hot Dawg" hanging unit heater in my garage to keep my cars toasty

 

 

Good luck

 

ps this isnt my just my personal thoughts, its factual

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This all good info. What about the moisture seeping up through the concrete? We have 4 to 6 in. concrete without any moisture barrier beneath it. I'm worried it might end up rusting my car out from the bottom up. I have been looking at mats and/or rubber tile floor to put under the car to help protect it.. What's your thoughts or ideas?

 

GT500_Grad

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This all good info. What about the moisture seeping up through the concrete? We have 4 to 6 in. concrete without any moisture barrier beneath it. I'm worried it might end up rusting my car out from the bottom up. I have been looking at mats and/or rubber tile floor to put under the car to help protect it.. What's your thoughts or ideas?

 

GT500_Grad

 

epoxy floor covering. acid wash the concrete first.

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This all good info. What about the moisture seeping up through the concrete? We have 4 to 6 in. concrete without any moisture barrier beneath it. I'm worried it might end up rusting my car out from the bottom up. I have been looking at mats and/or rubber tile floor to put under the car to help protect it.. What's your thoughts or ideas?

 

GT500_Grad

 

Excellent question, So I was always told to tape a peice of plastic on the floor and go back in 3 days , if there is moisture between the plastic and the concrete then there is no vapor barrier under the concrete and the expoxy will not stick so I never did my garage as it did not pass the plastic test.

 

3 years ago in our work shop we exspanded out offices and figured we would try expoxy, I did the plastic test and sure enough it showed there was no vapor barrier and against my suggestions of not using expoxy they installed the epoxy. My partner purchased on line but it seamed like it was the same stuff sold in home depot. They cleaned the floor, they used the acid wash as directed and with all of the file cabinets and desk slid across the floor, all of the little chair wheels going across it dailey it hasent lifted and still shines the same as the day it was laided down. this spring I am going to try it in my wifes garage but I am now a beliver in the 2 part expoxy systems for garage floors , The epoxy now acts as a vapor barrier as if I do the plastic test on it no moisture is under the plastic no mater how long I leave it down

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Excellent question, So I was always told to tape a peice of plastic on the floor and go back in 3 days , if there is moisture between the plastic and the concrete then there is no vapor barrier under the concrete and the expoxy will not stick so I never did my garage as it did not pass the plastic test.

 

3 years ago in our work shop we exspanded out offices and figured we would try expoxy, I did the plastic test and sure enough it showed there was no vapor barrier and against my suggestions of not using expoxy they installed the epoxy. My partner purchased on line but it seamed like it was the same stuff sold in home depot. They cleaned the floor, they used the acid wash as directed and with all of the file cabinets and desk slid across the floor, all of the little chair wheels going across it dailey it hasent lifted and still shines the same as the day it was laided down. this spring I am going to try it in my wifes garage but I am now a beliver in the 2 part expoxy systems for garage floors , The epoxy now acts as a vapor barrier as if I do the plastic test on it no moisture is under the plastic no mater how long I leave it down

 

That's been my experience as well - with one caveat. I had to do mine twice.

 

The first time - I used the muriatic acid and did not rinse well enough - I simply used a hose and a brush. I put epoxy down and over two years or so - it cracked and lifted all over. So I got a power washer and power washed off all of the remaining epoxy - and also remaining acid that I figured was there. I then put it down a second time and it's been 5 years now with no flaws. I have dragged my 3-ton jack all over this floor - and all sorts of other stuff. No problem whatsoever. I believe the epoxy provides a very effective vapor barrier. My garage would be humid at times before and is now bone dry year round.

 

The key to making epoxy work is preparation. The concrete must be etched and must be free of any contaminants. (lesson learned)

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What a great topic for Northerners! Well I took back my propane force air bullet. I guess my next question here is besides epoxing, what else could you do to stop moisture from arising from the concrete? What about putting down 4x8 sheets of plywood to park the car on?

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What a great topic for Northerners! Well I took back my propane force air bullet. I guess my next question here is besides epoxing, what else could you do to stop moisture from arising from the concrete? What about putting down 4x8 sheets of plywood to park the car on?

 

 

 

I dont think that will help as the plywood is just going to apsorb the moisture and release into the air. If concerned I would set up a de-humidifier in the garage.

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What a great topic for Northerners! Well I took back my propane force air bullet. I guess my next question here is besides epoxing, what else could you do to stop moisture from arising from the concrete? What about putting down 4x8 sheets of plywood to park the car on?

 

The wood would do not good ,actually it could make things worse at it would work as a "wick" to pull the moisture out of the floor.

 

Yesterday was a bad day in our area (NY/NJ metro area) I had the heat off in the garage, the garage once it get cold stays cold until I heat it. Yesterday was wet after a night of rain but real warm above 50 degrees. I had to get some tools out of the garage to bring to work and as soon as I open my garage door and walked in I realized it was a mistake. As quick as I opened the door I seen my cars just flash over with moisture. .Just like taking an icey cold beer out of a cooler on a damp warm day.

 

I turned the heat on and left.

 

If you dont want to heat or dehumid you car for the winter. I have seen these real cool car capsules that have a fan in them and the car sits in that for the winter. Great idea but just not so easy to get at the car to play around with it.

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