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KR MSRP unveiled


GT500-07

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Thought this should be a new thread

 

Complements of ShelbyDude today at 12:37pm. Very good find

 

2008 Ford Shelby GT 500 KR with a manufacturer's suggested retail price (MSRP) of $79,995. The first of this highly sought after performance car recently sold at a charity auction.

 

 

 

 

http://forum.teamshelby.com/forums/index.p...40&start=40

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Thought this should be a new thread

 

Complements of ShelbyDude today at 12:37pm. Very good find

 

2008 Ford Shelby GT 500 KR with a manufacturer's suggested retail price (MSRP) of $79,995. The first of this highly sought after performance car recently sold at a charity auction.

 

 

 

 

http://forum.teamshelby.com/forums/index.p...40&start=40

 

 

WHY SO EXPENSIVE???????????????????????????????????

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WHY SO EXPENSIVE???????????????????????????????????

 

I think the answer to this one is quite simple. Ford has seen what happened with the GT500. They left money on the table by pricing it a lot lower than any car with that kind of HP. That did not benefit the consumer, but rather the dealers. Had Ford priced 10-15K higher, the ADM would have been lower and the actual transaction price would have been roughly the same, except that Ford would have made about $100 Million on these cars for 2007 (taking into an MSRP increase of 10K, with the actual production for the 2007 model year exceeding 10,000).

 

This time around, Ford is certainly determined to get a bigger piece of the pie, and don't forget that SAI is involved in the production of this one so it is normal that they make a profit out of it too.

 

That being said, if you use the GT500 as a benchmark and try to price the additional features on the KR, KR's MSRP looks very high, but it is first and foremost a function of the regular GT500 being priced very competitively to begin with.

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Thought this should be a new thread

 

Complements of ShelbyDude today at 12:37pm. Very good find

 

2008 Ford Shelby GT 500 KR with a manufacturer's suggested retail price (MSRP) of $79,995. The first of this highly sought after performance car recently sold at a charity auction.

 

 

 

 

http://forum.teamshelby.com/forums/index.p...40&start=40

 

 

Thanks, but that wasn't my find. mywickedshelby posted this earlier today. I just repeated it in the MSRP thread.

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This time around, Ford is certainly determined to get a bigger piece of the pie, and don't forget that SAI is involved in the production of this one so it is normal that they make a profit out of it too.

 

I dunno... 1000 units times (say) $10K additional MSRP is $1 million dollars. Ford is losing billions of dollars, and raising/lowering the MSRP isn't likely to affect the final price (and any goodwill they might get from customers). I'm not sure wiggling the MSRP one way or the other is going to help them much.

 

For $1 million dollars, they could barely buy back 5 KR's... :doh:

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I dunno... 1000 units times (say) $10K additional MSRP is $1 million dollars. Ford is losing billions of dollars, and raising/lowering the MSRP isn't likely to affect the final price (and any goodwill they might get from customers). I'm not sure wiggling the MSRP one way or the other is going to help them much.

 

For $1 million dollars, they could barely buy back 5 KR's... :doh:

 

 

First of all, welcome to the forum. I know it might be small compared to Ford's current losses but you have to start somewhere. Also, unless I'm mistaken, the actual gain would be more like $10 million (1,000 x $10,000). At $80K each, I suspect that the additional profit for Ford compared with the same number of GT500 sold would be even more, maybe in the $20-25 million range.

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Absolutely, No question about it. The KR's price has made the SS the vlaue play here. The 500KR is a very questionable value at 80 grand. It will be interesting to see how long the $80,000. price point holds over a multi year run.

Yeah, not to mention the ADM's. What value can a consumer expect the car to hold? It's a Shelby yeah , but it's still a car.

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This is greed, from the for sale forum

 

 

ANY ONE LOOKING FOR A SHELBY GT500 KR?

 

IF YOU ARE LOOKING FOR A SHELBY GT500KR TO BUY CALL ME.

 

I HAVE 2 THAT I CAN LOCK DOWN FOR 179000.00 EACH.

 

LET ME KNOW IF I CAN HELP ANYONE.

 

CALL BRADLEY @ 865 661 8191

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Absolutely, No question about it. The KR's price has made the SS the vlaue play here. The 500KR is a very questionable value at 80 grand. It will be interesting to see how long the $80,000. price point holds over a multi year run.

The GT500 SS and KR are really two different animals. And really, they each appeal to different markets. At 80K each though, they are a value without a doubt.

 

The car will not hold any ADM. That is a privaledge tax paid to be any early owner. The real question here is; What percentage of the 80 thousand MSRP will a used unit bring in 3-5 years? New cars do NOT hold their value regardless of whose name or what sequence of numbers and letters it happens to be adorned with.

What? The Shelby Mustangs (and Cobras) didn't hold their value, they blasted and trail blazed VALUES on the muscle car market in general. GM and Chrysler made some stellar products in the 1960s too, but their values have traditionally lagged behind the Shelby models.

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This is greed, from the for sale forum

 

 

ANY ONE LOOKING FOR A SHELBY GT500 KR?

 

IF YOU ARE LOOKING FOR A SHELBY GT500KR TO BUY CALL ME.

 

I HAVE 2 THAT I CAN LOCK DOWN FOR 179000.00 EACH.

 

LET ME KNOW IF I CAN HELP ANYONE.

 

CALL BRADLEY @ 865 661 8191

I don't call that greed, I call it supply and demand....pretty much like many other things in our economy.

 

Let me ask this...regarding the Super Bowl game, do they pay the players on the Patriots more than any other player in the NFL? Well, they do get paid for the game...so in a sense yes...but it's not materially more.

 

Are the referees paid a lot more? I don't know for sure...perhaps a little.

 

Does it cost more to turn the lights on for that game than any other? No.

 

Sure, they have more cameras at the game...so there's a bit of added cost there....and I'm sure you can find other examples.

 

Maybe the TV station pays the announcers more? Doubt it.

 

Perhaps there's a special "Super Bowl Gatorade guy" who dumps on the winning coaches head...and maybe they pay him a lot? No.

 

Then why do the tickets cost 10 to 20 times more than a regular season game?

 

Hmmm...can't figure that one out. post-3382-1202555183.gif

 

I'm being sarcastic here, but my point is that the costs involved in playing the Super Bowl are largely the same (not exactly....but largely) as any other game during the year...but the cost to see the game in person is DRAMATICALLY higher. And this is an example of supply and demand. I know cars are different than football games....but just trying to draw some parallels. I think if the dealer can get $1 million dollars for a KR, then "have at it".

 

Dave

post-3382-1202555183.gif

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What? The Shelby Mustangs (and Cobras) didn't hold their value, they blasted and trail blazed VALUES on the muscle car market in general.

I agree with you on this one robert. Very few cars have done this in history (been worth more later as a used car than new), but it does happen, and the Shelbys are one of the best examples of this. Even adjusted for inflation they are worth more in most cases.

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I don't call that greed, I call it supply and demand....pretty much like many other things in our economy.

 

Let me ask this...regarding the Super Bowl game, do they pay the players on the Patriots more than any other player in the NFL? Well, they do get paid for the game...so in a sense yes...but it's not materially more.

 

Are the referees paid a lot more? I don't know for sure...perhaps a little.

 

Does it cost more to turn the lights on for that game than any other? No.

 

Sure, they have more cameras at the game...so there's a bit of added cost there....and I'm sure you can find other examples.

 

Maybe the TV station pays the announcers more? Doubt it.

 

Perhaps there's a special "Super Bowl Gatorade guy" who dumps on the winning coaches head...and maybe they pay him a lot? No.

 

Then why do the tickets cost 10 to 20 times more than a regular season game?

 

Hmmm...can't figure that one out. chin.gif

 

I'm being sarcastic here, but my point is that the costs involved in playing the Super Bowl are largely the same (not exactly....but largely) as any other game during the year...but the cost to see the game in person is DRAMATICALLY higher. And this is an example of supply and demand. I know cars are different than football games....but just trying to draw some parallels. I think if the dealer can get $1 million dollars for a KR, then "have at it".

 

Dave

 

I agree with you to a large extent. To take your SuperBowl analogy one step further, a 30 sec. TV ad doesn't run any longer, but cost way more during the SuperBowl than during any other regular season or playoff game. That being said, there is also a matter of business philosophy here. A business can decide to make a big buck now, or chose to leave some money on the table now, which may pay off in customer loyalty in the future. Not all businesses take the same approach when retailing a hot item and the pure "supply and demand" business model is not always applied and not necessarily the best strategy if you want to achieve long term success IMHO.

 

I'll give you an exemple that happened to me last May. For his 7th birthday, I wanted to buy to my little nephew a Nintendo Wii game console. I don't know about the US but here in Canada, demand for these has greatly exceeded supply since it was introduced late in 2006. I went to every store chain in Quebec and couldn't find one even though it had launched almost 6 months before. Every store manager told me the same thing: they receive shipments once every couple of weeks or so, and sell them on a first come first served basis with a limit of one unit per customer, and without taking advanced orders. From what they told me, they usually sell in less than an hour.

 

Asked about the price, everybody was in the same ballpark (about $280) even though demand would dictate that it sells for a price closer to the Playstation 3 or XBox 360, which are sell popular and sell for much more. Still, none of the retail stores that I went to adjusted its price upwards. They seemed content to have a steady stream of customers entering their stores every couple of weeks hoping to be lucky and find a Wii in stock. Tired from waiting to get one and with my nephew's birthday's aproaching, I finally purchased a brand new one from a private party on Ebay for about $320 (yes, I paid over MSRP on this one also :hysterical: ). I was willing to pay more to get one and asked a few of the stores I went to if that could be done, but every one stuck with their "one price for all first come first served policy". They could have made more money but refused, in order to treat all their customers fairly. It frustrated me on a personal level because I was ready to pay more to get my unit on time, but I respect that kind of business philosophy. It could aslo be said that Nintendo could have applied the supply and demand theory itself and increase MSRP for its Wii console thus making more profit, considering the high demand; however it chose not choose to do so.

 

I also use this analogy because Nintendo's position was in a way similar to that of Ford; their market share was decreasing as the sales of their previous generation console were lagging behind those of Sony and Microsoft. They finally introduced a hot product to the market (the Wii) but still priced it below its competitors and stuck with this pricing strategy. Now, they have reclaimed the No.1 status that they had in the industry in the early 90s even though they seemed almost dead only a few years ago.

 

I know that cars and game consoles are different markets and I'm not into any anti-ADM crusade (I paid about 10K over MSRP myself) but I think Ford dealers should look at the big picture, trying to achieve long term growth instead of focusing on making short term huge profit from their hottest products.

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I agree with you to a large extent. To take your SuperBowl analogy one step further, a 30 sec. TV ad doesn't run any longer, but cost way more during the SuperBowl than during any other regular season or playoff game. That being said, there is also a matter of business philosophy here. A business can decide to make a big buck now, or chose to leave some money on the table now, which may pay off in customer loyalty in the future. Not all businesses take the same approach when retailing a hot item and the pure "supply and demand" business model is not always applied and not necessarily the best strategy if you want to achieve long term success IMHO.

 

I'll give you an exemple that happened to me last May. For his 7th birthday, I wanted to buy to my little nephew a Nintendo Wii game console. I don't know about the US but here in Canada, demand for these has greatly exceeded supply since it was introduced late in 2006. I went to every store chain in Quebec and couldn't find one even though it had launched almost 6 months before. Every store manager told me the same thing: they receive shipments once every couple of weeks or so, and sell them on a first come first served basis with a limit of one unit per customer, and without taking advanced orders. From what they told me, they usually sell in less than an hour.

 

Asked about the price, everybody was in the same ballpark (about $280) even though demand would dictate that it sells for a price closer to the Playstation 3 or XBox 360, which are sell popular and sell for much more. Still, none of the retail stores that I went to adjusted its price upwards. They seemed content to have a steady stream of customers entering their stores every couple of weeks hoping to be lucky and find a Wii in stock. Tired from waiting to get one and with my nephew's birthday's aproaching, I finally purchased a brand new one from a private party on Ebay for about $320 (yes, I paid over MSRP on this one also :hysterical: ). I was willing to pay more to get one and asked a few of the stores I went to if that could be done, but every one stuck with their "one price for all first come first served policy". They could have made more money but refused, in order to treat all their customers fairly. It frustrated me on a personal level because I was ready to pay more to get my unit on time, but I respect that kind of business philosophy. It could aslo be said that Nintendo could have applied the supply and demand theory itself and increase MSRP for its Wii console thus making more profit, considering the high demand; however it chose not choose to do so.

 

I also use this analogy because Nintendo's position was in a way similar to that of Ford; their market share was decreasing as the sales of their previous generation console were lagging behind those of Sony and Microsoft. They finally introduced a hot product to the market (the Wii) but still priced it below its competitors and stuck with this pricing strategy. Now, they have reclaimed the No.1 status that they had in the industry in the early 90s even though they seemed almost dead only a few years ago.

 

I know that cars and game consoles are different markets and I'm not into any anti-ADM crusade (I paid about 10K over MSRP myself) but I think Ford dealers should look at the big picture, trying to achieve long term growth instead of focusing on making short term huge profit from their hottest products.

Now just think!! if they only made 100000 total wii's would they still ask only 280???

i'm not a gamer so I would not pay 10.00 for one but! a gamer might pay 500 + for one of the 100000 units :finger: or MORE so itis the same in lot's of other retail merchandise supply and demand !!

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Now just think!! if they only made 100000 total wii's would they still ask only 280???

i'm not a gamer so I would not pay 10.00 for one but! a gamer might pay 500 + for one of the 100000 units :finger: or MORE so itis the same in lot's of other retail merchandise supply and demand !!

 

 

My point exactly. Demand on the wii IS currently greater than supply (not sure now but it still was late last year, about a year after its launch). Yes, it's not limited in it's overall production (in a way, I agree this is more like a regular GT500 than a KR but the GT500 still brought ADM for well over a year). But the fact is Nintendo and traditional retail outlets that sell the wii have not raised the price in reaction to higher demand, which they could have done easily. Those who made a profit out of it are what I would call "second level retailers" i.e. those that puchase from traditional outlet at MSRP and resell the items for more on E-Bay. By definition, those people don't care if they get repeat customers; they're just there to make a quick buck.

 

My personal opinion is that car dealers should rather build there business the way traditional retailers do i.e. to get repeat sales and build customers' loyalty. I'm not in the car retail busness so maybe I'm all wrong and maybe the best way to profit is indeed to try to make a quick buck on a hot item before demand cools off and forget about customers loyalty. I just tought that this supply and demand thing, while true and acceptable to a degree, sometimes gets pushed to extreme levels without regard for long term consequences on the seller's business.

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The GT500 SS and KR are really two different animals. And really, they each appeal to different markets. At 80K each though, they are a value without a doubt.

 

 

What? The Shelby Mustangs (and Cobras) didn't hold their value, they blasted and trail blazed VALUES on the muscle car market in general. GM and Chrysler made some stellar products in the 1960s too, but their values have traditionally lagged behind the Shelby models.

 

Value?

 

You can get an 08 z06 for way less than 80k and it is faster in every single category, you can also get the new 08 Viper with 600hp

The SS and KR are for collectors only, much more value in buying a GT500 and building it yourself for alot less money and faster to boot

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My point exactly. Demand on the wii IS currently greater than supply (not sure now but it still was late last year, about a year after its launch). Yes, it's not limited in it's overall production (in a way, I agree this is more like a regular GT500 than a KR but the GT500 still brought ADM for well over a year). But the fact is Nintendo and traditional retail outlets that sell the wii have not raised the price in reaction to higher demand, which they could have done easily. Those who made a profit out of it are what I would call "second level retailers" i.e. those that puchase from traditional outlet at MSRP and resell the items for more on E-Bay. By definition, those people don't care if they get repeat customers; they're just there to make a quick buck.

 

My personal opinion is that car dealers should rather build there business the way traditional retailers do i.e. to get repeat sales and build customers' loyalty. I'm not in the car retail busness so maybe I'm all wrong and maybe the best way to profit is indeed to try to make a quick buck on a hot item before demand cools off and forget about customers loyalty. I just tought that this supply and demand thing, while true and acceptable to a degree, sometimes gets pushed to extreme levels without regard for long term consequences on the seller's business.

 

 

Look at it this way. If dealers did sell these at MSRP with no ADM because they were more concerned with repeat business and owner loyalty, then most people that did get one would never have gotten theirs.

 

Every dealer has many GOOD REPEAT LOYAL customers and had these been given away at MSRP every one of these would have been sold to one of those customers instead of most of the people that did get one.

 

Imagine this. No ADM. All GT500's at MSRP only. Customer walks in. I want one. Dealer....Oh, I'm sorry, but you are not a loyal enough customer here that has purchased at least 20+ vehicles from us. You will have to get in line because we have a lot of customers that are much more loyal and these are reserved for those customers first. If NONE of our TOP loyal customers want it, then we will go down the line offering it to our next most loyal customers first. Then after we get through that list of customers and if we still have one to sell, THEN you might have a shot of getting one here.

 

Yeah, but I am a loyal customer. I bought 3 vehicles here over the past 20 years! Doesn't that make me loyal? Sorry, not as loyal as the customers that buy 3 every year. And not as loyal as the ones that buy an average of at least one every year. Not as loyal as the ones that buy one every 3 years over the past 20 years. There are MANY customers that are much more loyal that we have to give first chance to buy before we get to you.

 

So for most of the people that did get one of these have ADM's to thank for it, because without the ADM most of the people that got one never would have been able to get one. All those loyal repeat customers would have gotten them instead. Then those that did get one would have had to buy it from one of those loyal customers at a premium anyway!

 

This is pretty much the reason for the ADM's. Most people that want the newest hottest product for the most part aren't the big loyal customers. So they are willing to pay more and drive the market values up creating the high demand for it.

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Look at it this way. If dealers did sell these at MSRP with no ADM because they were more concerned with repeat business and owner loyalty, then most people that did get one would never have gotten theirs.

 

Every dealer has many GOOD REPEAT LOYAL customers and had these been given away at MSRP every one of these would have been sold to one of those customers instead of most of the people that did get one.

 

Imagine this. No ADM. All GT500's at MSRP only. Customer walks in. I want one. Dealer....Oh, I'm sorry, but you are not a loyal enough customer here that has purchased at least 20+ vehicles from us. You will have to get in line because we have a lot of customers that are much more loyal and these are reserved for those customers first. If NONE of our TOP loyal customers want it, then we will go down the line offering it to our next most loyal customers first. Then after we get through that list of customers and if we still have one to sell, THEN you might have a shot of getting one here.

 

Yeah, but I am a loyal customer. I bought 3 vehicles here over the past 20 years! Doesn't that make me loyal? Sorry, not as loyal as the customers that buy 3 every year. And not as loyal as the ones that buy an average of at least one every year. Not as loyal as the ones that buy one every 3 years over the past 20 years. There are MANY customers that are much more loyal that we have to give first chance to buy before we get to you.

 

So for most of the people that did get one of these have ADM's to thank for it, because without the ADM most of the people that got one never would have been able to get one. All those loyal repeat customers would have gotten them instead. Then those that did get one would have had to buy it from one of those loyal customers at a premium anyway!

 

This is pretty much the reason for the ADM's. Most people that want the newest hottest product for the most part aren't the big loyal customers. So they are willing to pay more and drive the market values up creating the high demand for it.

 

I see your point and as usual, it's very well made. However what I meant was not that there should be some sort of "loyalty test" imposed by dealer before anyone could buy their car. What I meant was rather that if your treat a customer fairly, there is a good chance that this customer will continue to do business with you in the long run and talk about his positive experience to other people. That's what I meant when I talked about building customer loyalty. Going back to my initial post on the subject, again, I have paid over MSRP for mine and I understand that dealers don't make a fortune when they sell cars at MSRP. I don't necessarily mind some level of ADM but if as an example, I really wanted a KR and ultimately ended up paying a 60K ADM for it, I would not necessarily consider this as a positive buying experience and the dealer that sold it to me would not be on my radar screen when time comes for me to purchase my next daily driver.

 

The cars that fall into the "gotta have it" category are few and far between; the GT500 and the KR fall into that category. I would bet that many GT500 owners are first time Ford owners (I am). If you can impress customers for those cars not only with great products (the GT500 definitely being one) but also with a good buying experience, there is a chance that they will eventually think of your brand and dealership when they need to replace their "bread and butter" daily drivers. Otherwise, they may continue to look elswhere.

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I see your point and as usual, it's very well made. However what I meant was not that there should be some sort of "loyalty test" imposed by dealer before anyone could buy their car. What I meant was rather that if your treat a customer fairly, there is a good chance that this customer will continue to do business with you in the long run and talk about his positive experience to other people. That's what I meant when I talked about building customer loyalty. Going back to my initial post on the subject, again, I have paid over MSRP for mine and I understand that dealers don't make a fortune when they sell cars at MSRP. I don't necessarily mind some level of ADM but if as an example, I really wanted a KR and ultimately ended up paying a 60K ADM for it, I would not necessarily consider this as a positive buying experience and the dealer that sold it to me would not be on my radar screen when time comes for me to purchase my next daily driver.

 

The cars that fall into the "gotta have it" category are few and far between; the GT500 and the KR fall into that category. I would bet that many GT500 owners are first time Ford owners (I am). If you can impress customers for those cars not only with great products (the GT500 definitely being one) but also with a good buying experience, there is a chance that they will eventually think of your brand and dealership when they need to replace their "bread and butter" daily drivers. Otherwise, they may continue to look elswhere.

 

 

I understand your point. I wasn't implying there would be some type of "loyalty test". Every dealer knows who there good loyal customers are.

 

No matter how this was handled it would create problems of some sort.

 

You sell to a first time Ford buyer then you piss off your loyal customers. Who is more important? A first time customer that wants the number one hottest selling product or your good loyal customer that wants it? Sell to the first time customer in jusy "hopes" that "maybe" they will buy more Fords and from "your dealership" in the future and you piss off and lose the customer you already have that has proven to be a good loyal customer that has purchased many vehicles from you already.

 

Who to do choose? Obviously you would choose the loyal customer you already have.

 

If you add ADM's it makes it a little more fair to everyone. Price it at what the market is bringing. Only in some cases you piss off the loyal customers you have because they expect you to sell to them way below what the market is just because they don't want to pay over sticker.

 

So the dealer can't win no matter what they do. Ford doesn't build enough supply to over saturate the market so that leaves many buyers having to go without. Those who can and will pay end up with one. Those who can't and won't pay will be pissed and bad mouth you. Same would happen if you sold to loyal customers and never added a ADM.

 

The problem is you have 1 car to sell to 10+ buyers that want it. So no matter how you do it, you are dammed if you do and dammed if you don't. It is a no win situation.

 

I forsee more customers being chased away that bought this car and paid ADM's from being future buyers after Ford continues to build this car after 2008. Most paid those ADM's because they were lead to believe this was going to be limited to two years only. Now they have lost all that extra money they paid in huge depreciation just because Ford decides to continue to build it for more years than they lead everyone to believe.

 

That is approx 18K - 19K existing customers that purchased this car alone!

 

Why can't the MANUFACTURER just be honest and straight with the dealers and the public? WHY do they insist on being so secretive about this?

 

It's a simple question! Will this be limited to two years or not?

 

Back up a year and "maybe" the answer to that question was unknown yet. So why not just be honest? We don't know at this time. It depends on how sales go with this car. If sales are good we are considering more in the following years. If there are no plans then why not just say no, they are not building more?

 

By now they KNOW whether they are or not. Yet they still haven't said anything to their dealers about it. There is no way they can not know at this time with the 09 model year being only a few months away.

 

Yet if you were to talk to most dealers they are under the belief that 08 is it! They have no clue there will be a 09. Officially, none us know. Some of us just know based on strong rumors that have come from employees at Ford.

 

Whether they are or whether they are not, they need to inform their dealers of it one way or the other so dealers are not giving out false information to the consumers. The manufacturer needs to stop trying to run their company like they are the government and be straight forward with their dealers and the consumers!

 

They need to inform their dealers on a first to know basis before making it public to the consumers and leaving their dealers in the dark all the time. It makes their dealers look like idiots because they have not been informed of anything and consumers are walking into dealerships asking questions about products they have not heard anything about yet!

 

They need to start making sure they have the commodities available to produce what they offer and build what the consumers want instead of what they "think" they want.

 

They need to stop advertising products the consumer can't get because they can't produce it. Example. The Escape Hybrid. They have less than 400 in the nation, they can't fill any retail orders on these, people have had orders sitting for 9+ months with no idea when or if they will ever get it. Yet they keep spending millions to advertise the product and you can't even get it!

 

They need to make all retail sold orders a top priority and pull and schedule those orders before passing them over and just scheduling stock orders ahead of those that have not been sold.

 

They need to put the sold units ahead of all allocation and insure those customers are taken care of first!

 

They need to do a better job of marketing their products and educating the consumers about their products.

 

They need to build and offer superior products at prices most consumers can afford instead of pricing most of them out of the market.

 

They need to stop cheapening their products with all these huge rebates which creates lousy resale value. Price it right from the start and make it affordable for most people instead of just the middle to upper class. Stop trying to be something they are not, which is Toyota or Honda that sells to most upper white collar USA. Focus on what made their company which is blue collar USA. They priced their biggest market share out of the market and chased those consumers off to Hyundia and KIA because those are more affordable.

 

They need to trim all the fat from the top down, instead of trying to trim the meat from the bottom up!

 

Take care of the CUSTOMER! Build what they want, at a price they can afford, do away with all the BS red tape and provide them with EXCELLENT SERVICE!!!

 

Then, and ONLY THEN, will they ever start to gain back their market share.

 

How hard is it????

 

Hmmmmmmmm.....should apply for CEO? :hysterical:

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Value?

 

You can get an 08 z06 for way less than 80k and it is faster in every single category, you can also get the new 08 Viper with 600hp

The SS and KR are for collectors only, much more value in buying a GT500 and building it yourself for alot less money and faster to boot

A Corvette is a Corvette and a Viper is a Viper. They are not even in the same league as a Mustang. They never have been. If you want to compare the Corvette (which I love, by the way) or a Viper to a Mustang, let's toss in another equation.

 

You can get a motorcycle for 1/10 the price of a Z06 or Viper that will blow it away in EVERY category.....and they can seat two people too.

 

The Corvette argument doesn't hold water here because they don't compete with each other.

 

The FORD MUSTANG is the only four seat sport car out there and the Shelby version is valued for its historical performance roots. These roots make it a CULT vehicle like none other. The current Shelby models have taken and built upon that heritage. Does anyone think that the upcoming Camaro or Challenger, which I concede are both well done and welcomed in the market place will top Shelby in terms of a product lineup?

 

Let's review this:

 

GT500: Base 500 horsepower

GT500KR: Base 540 horsepower

GT500 SS: Base 600 horsepower

GT500 SS: Base 725_ish horsepower

 

And guess what? Carroll said more is coming!

 

Both GM and Chrysler could only hope to have a partner like Shelby in their stable. Neither of them have anything like Shelby because quite frankly, no other company like Shelby else exists.

 

We all have heard rumblings about Roush or Saleen taking the Camaro or Challenger and taking it to the next level. But guess what? BOTH Roush and Saleen have patterned their success around the Mustang and more candidly, around Shelby.

 

And that's why the Shelby Mustang is a CULT car. It's THE quintessential original and there's always a value that people place upon that.

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Value?

 

You can get an 08 z06 for way less than 80k and it is faster in every single category, you can also get the new 08 Viper with 600hp

The SS and KR are for collectors only, much more value in buying a GT500 and building it yourself for alot less money and faster to boot

A Corvette is a Corvette and a Viper is a Viper. They are not even in the same league as a Mustang. They never have been. If you want to compare the Corvette (which I love, by the way) or a Viper to a Mustang, let's toss in another equation.

 

You can get a motorcycle for 1/10 the price of a Z06 or Viper that will blow it away in EVERY category.....and they can seat two people too.

 

The Corvette argument doesn't hold water here because they don't compete with each other.

 

The FORD MUSTANG is the only four seat sport car out there and the Shelby version is valued for its historical performance roots. These roots make it a CULT vehicle like none other. The current Shelby models have taken and built upon that heritage. Does anyone think that the upcoming Camaro or Challenger, which I concede are both well done and welcomed in the market place will top Shelby in terms of a product lineup?

 

Let's review this:

 

GT500: Base 500 horsepower

GT500KR: Base 540 horsepower

GT500 SS: Base 600 horsepower

GT500 SS: Base 725_ish horsepower

 

And guess what? Carroll said more is coming!

 

Both GM and Chrysler could only hope to have a partner like Shelby in their stable. Neither of them have anything like Shelby because quite frankly, no other company like Shelby else exists.

 

We all have heard rumblings about Roush or Saleen taking the Camaro or Challenger and taking it to the next level. But guess what? BOTH Roush and Saleen have patterned their success around the Mustang and more candidly, around Shelby.

 

And that's why the Shelby Mustang is a CULT car. It's THE quintessential original and there's always a value that people place upon that.

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