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To all you lucky people who have GT500'S now


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Where are the vid's of smokey burnout's, Donut's and 1/4 mile times. It's your Duty as the frist to help us othere guys and girls that dont even have vin# yet. You need to start a line and start giving rids its only right! Dind't your mom or dad teach you to play well with others.................

 

I as a non-gt500 driving person demand that you gt500 drivers eather STOP driving them until we all have recived ours OR you start shareing your........

 

 

j/j have fun and post up with some real info lie how fast they really are in the 1/4 and stuff.. To everyong when i get mine even if iam the last one in the 2007 my.. I WILL take my car to the track the frist test n tune thay have on matter what.........................

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Where are the vid's of smokey burnout's, Donut's and 1/4 mile times. It's your Duty as the frist to help us othere guys and girls that dont even have vin# yet. You need to start a line and start giving rids its only right! Dind't your mom or dad teach you to play well with others.................

 

I as a non-gt500 driving person demand that you gt500 drivers eather STOP driving them until we all have recived ours OR you start shareing your........

j/j have fun and post up with some real info lie how fast they really are in the 1/4 and stuff.. To everyong when i get mine even if iam the last one in the 2007 my.. I WILL take my car to the track the frist test n tune thay have on matter what.........................

 

Don't forget, before we flog too hard, we must break the drivetrain in first.

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I am sure you guys are having no trouble putting the break in miles on with a great big smile on your face.

 

True, true.

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It's broken in after the drive home. These aren't 60's pushrod V8's.

 

 

 

I've heard many conflicting views on break-in. None of it supported by more than someone's opinion or anecdotal evidence (e.g. ...this is how I've done my last X cars, and I've never had a problem...or, my brother's best friend is a mechanic and he says I should do it this way...).

 

Is there a definitive school of thought regarding break-in? One that is supported by testing or some form of actual analysis?

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I've heard many conflicting views on break-in. None of it supported by more than someone's opinion or anecdotal evidence (e.g. ...this is how I've done my last X cars, and I've never had a problem...or, my brother's best friend is a mechanic and he says I should do it this way...).

 

Is there a definitive school of thought regarding break-in? One that is supported by testing or some form of actual analysis?

 

 

That's a great question! Seems like everybody has a different "rule."

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Don't mean to hi jack here, but I just found these web sites that I thought were pretty interesting:

 

http://www.mototuneusa.com/break_in_secrets.htm

 

And another one...though this is to do with airplane engines, it may be applicable:

 

http://www.lycoming.textron.com/main.jsp?b...ineBreakIn.html

 

I'd love to here well supported opinions (well, even marginally supported opinions).

 

I'm also interested to hear about brake break in...

 

Times have changed since I last thought about this stuff.

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I'm also interested to hear about brake break in...

 

Times have changed since I last thought about this stuff.

 

I was a brake tech for about 5 years. There are several keys to keeping effective brakes.

  1. For the first 100 or so stops, avoid significant heat build up. This gives the rotors and pads a chance to "take a set"...which means the surfaces wear slightly to conform to each other.

  2. Avoid significant amounts of heat whenever possible. For example, if you come down a long hill riding your brakes, then the road flattens at a stop light, you should brake to stop at the light, then let your foot off the brake pedal (so long as the car doesn't roll). This prevents the heat in the rotors from "baking" in the one area on the rotor where the pads are applied. Instead, by releasing the pedal, you are allowing air to flow through that small gap and cool the rotor. Not doing this will result (over time) in brake rotor "warp", and they will start to "pulsate" and require resurfacing.

  3. Do not spray cold water on a hot brake rotor, such as washing it right after a hot stop.

  4. Similarly to the above point, driving through a deep puddle while the rotors are hot may also splash cold water on a hot rotor...again...not good. This will change the metallurgy of the rotor and result in "glazing"...which is where the rotor metal becomes slightly brittle and takes on a glossy appearance. Braking performance will be slightly decreased by this.

  5. Semi-metallic brake pads improve stopping distances and reduce fade, but at a slight expense to rotor life. Take your pick.

  6. When doing your own brake job, always lubricate caliper slides. After several years, they often start to "bind", resulting in uneven pad wear (usually the inners will wear faster than the outers).

  7. If you plan on keeping your Shelby "forever", you may want to consider changing over to DOT5 silicone brake fluid. It is hydrophobic (meaning it won't attract moisture like regular brake fluid, which then means you will NEVER see corrosion in your brake parts), and has a slightly higher bulk modulus (meaning you'll feel a VERY slightly firmer pedal). The downsides to switching to DOT5 are twofold. First, you must COMPLETELY clean out all remnants of the old fluid. This means not only draining the old fluid, but disassembling calipers to clean them and replace any rubber components, flushing the entire system with denatured alcohol and then drying it with compressed air. Second, DOT5 fluid is very expensive. When I bought mine many years ago...it was $32 per quart (maybe the price has come down now?). I put DOT5 in my Camaro when I rebuilt the brake system in 1984. Today, I can guarantee you there is no rust or corrosion in any component in my braking system.

Dave :shift:

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