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OIL CHANGE


gt500forever

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Dear All,

 

I bought my GT500 on sep. 2007 and only has 300miles on them.

 

Do I need to change my oil now? or should I wait until mile reaches upto 1000miles?

 

Is my equip with any oil change alert message on the vehichle ? or I can just change oil whenever I want to without bother to reset any buttons?

 

Pls let me know.

 

Thanks

 

GT500forever,

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You could easily go to a 1,000 miles + &I don`t believe there is any think that wil tell you when to change your oil. Some changed their oil at 500 & others around 1,000 your choice when you want to change it.

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I'll vouch for him on that.

 

:hysterical2:

 

I changed mine at about 800 first time, but every 3,000 or so from here on.

I changed mine at 500 and the next one is at 3,500. (which is in 50 miles)

 

I want to be like Dave! :hysterical2:

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I did my first oil change at 1200 miles. I now have 2500 and probably won't be driving it very much cause of the weather. Come Spring time I will change it again! I plan to fill up the tank, put the car on jack stands and go out and start the car every 2 weeks and let it idle until it it at normal operating temp. Then when the weather breaks and it is time to get it out again I will fill it back up and drive it like I stole it again!

 

JJ

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I did my first oil change at 1200 miles. I now have 2500 and probably won't be driving it very much cause of the weather. Come Spring time I will change it again! I plan to fill up the tank, put the car on jack stands and go out and start the car every 2 weeks and let it idle until it it at normal operating temp. Then when the weather breaks and it is time to get it out again I will fill it back up and drive it like I stole it again!

 

JJ

Be sure to run the A/C for a minute also each time you start it.

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Dave

Is running the AC for a mninute or so for the sake of keeping the AC in operating condition or is there another benefit. By-the-way, thanks for the St Louis info, sounds like a good time.

AC refrigerant has a trace amount of lubricating oil in it to lube the seals throughout the system. If you don't run it in the winter occasionally, the seals slowly dry out and eventually will crack and the system will leak. This takes a long time, but if you want your AC to work well 10-15 years from now...run it for 1-2 minutes once a month even in winter.

 

You're welcome RE: St. Louis. I can tell you more details if you like...let me know. Had a good time last weekend also. :happy feet:

 

AD

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I did my first oil change at 1200 miles. I now have 2500 and probably won't be driving it very much cause of the weather. Come Spring time I will change it again! I plan to fill up the tank, put the car on jack stands and go out and start the car every 2 weeks and let it idle until it it at normal operating temp. Then when the weather breaks and it is time to get it out again I will fill it back up and drive it like I stole it again!

 

JJ

 

Are you lifting the wheels off the ground ?????????? Its not recommended to take all the weight from the suspension.

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AC refrigerant has a trace amount of lubricating oil in it to lube the seals throughout the system. If you don't run it in the winter occasionally, the seals slowly dry out and eventually will crack and the system will leak. This takes a long time, but if you want your AC to work well 10-15 years from now...run it for 1-2 minutes once a month even in winter.

 

You're welcome RE: St. Louis. I can tell you more details if you like...let me know. Had a good time last weekend also. :happy feet:

 

AD

 

I'm not absolutely sure with the Shelby, but usually running the defroster does the trick as well because the A/C runs while the defroster is on. The A/C is used to dehumidify the air.

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Old school says the first 500 mile has is hard on oil because everything is breaking in (wearing in)

Use to be at 500 mile you could change oil and find lot of fine metal's wear in oil.

I change mine at 500 miles it wasn’t that bad but I am glad I did.

 

And I will change it at 1000 mile another old school requirement.

 

0 to 500 mile should be all street driving slow and easy, no revving the engine.

500 to 1000 mile is crewzen the strip and freeway driving without maintaining the same speed for more then 10 -15 mins. Always very speed ever 10 mins. or so.

 

If the engine was build well and you followed those instructions you prolong you're engine's life, and would get better performance and power from it.

 

I know I'm going to get a rashen it chit from allot of folks now.

Before you hammer me -- conceder this.

 

If you take a poll on HP for stock engine(you could use any car/ engine) but let use the gt500

You will get reading of RWHP that range from 430 to 456 and up rwhp.

Ask yourself why that is.

 

Two reasons

 

1. Ever engine drive train is different --- true

2. The way her owner broke her in.

Nice and easy to start get her warm up to you and get use to running, keep her oil clean so she stays fresh and well lubricated; then after (a 1000 miles) she hot to trot drive her hard and put her away wet.

Drive her the way you intend to drive her and don't look back.

 

In todays world of new and improved toys. Oils lubercate much better and parts are made of better and stronger materials; less wear last longer. But break in still plays an important roll.

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Built my ramps today and changed the oil with 916 miles on the odometer. It was messy and the oil was like black molasses.

 

Used a 16mm wrench on the drain plug. The factory filter must have been screwed on by a gorilla. I used oil filter pliers to remove it. Had to squeeze real hard and use two hands to get it loose; deformed the filter pretty good. The FL-820S is large enough where you can get a good grip and hand-tighten it with two hands. It also mounts in an inverted position so you can fill it up with fresh oil before you install.

 

I filled with 6.5 quarts of Motorcraft 5W-50 per the manual.

 

I'll change again in 3000 miles or 6 months, which ever comes first.

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The FL-820S is large enough where you can get a good grip and hand-tighten it with two hands. It also mounts in an inverted position so you can fill it up with fresh oil before you install.

Do you think this is needed. I have never heard of this being done.

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Do you think this is needed. I have never heard of this being done.

I prefer to do this so the oil pressure builds up quicker. Learned of it long ago, don't know where, but it's been a habit whenever the filter mounting allows to me to pre-fill the filter. I really don't know if this makes any difference but it makes sense to me. You can't do this if the filter is mounted horizonally.

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I prefer to do this so the oil pressure builds up quicker. Learned of it long ago, don't know where, but it's been a habit whenever the filter mounting allows to me to pre-fill the filter. I really don't know if this makes any difference but it makes sense to me. You can't do this if the filter is mounted horizonally.

I was just curious about it.

 

Is your car going to be sitting over the winter and if so, will you really be changing the oil at 6 months even if you only have a few hundred miles on it ?

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On the oil change, the first is the most critical, just because there's little metal bits floating around in it. You won't see it, it's the stuff that the filter doesn't catch. I changed mine at 80 miles, and then 1000 miles. Next will be 3k, and every 3k after that.

 

Todays manufacturing standards make break-in less of a factor than it was. However, it's still important.

 

The main, most important thing on break in is to vary the load on the engine. Even the manual tells you not to drive at the same speed for extended periods of time. All the way back to whenever, the word was to go out and drive up and down hills to break in an engine.

 

Most of the moving parts are too big to matter (like the oil pump), or no metal-to-metal contact (like bearings). What you really want to do during the break-in is seat the rings. Nothing is perfect, and the cylinders have high and low spots, as do the rings and pistons. The cylinders are honed and the rings also have material meant to wear off during break-in. What happens is the rings and cylinder wear unevenly to "fill in" slight imperfections to create a perfect compression seal.

 

Generating power forces the rings against the cylinder. This causes them to seal, and during the break-in is when the intentional wear happens. Backing off the power creates a vacuum state and scavenges any debris to be blown out the exhaust (we're talking really tiny stuff here). Sometimes during break-in, it will actually smoke a little on deceleration as the oil is sucked past the rings (before they have fully sealed) from the bottom up.

 

Running at the same power level (i.e., cruise control at 65 mph) does not really generate enough power to force the rings against the cylinder during the break-in period, and they will wear pretty much in the same shape that they were manufactured, which is not necessarily a good thing.

 

After being broken in, the ring edges are perfectly smooth, and the cylinder walls are shiny. No more wear will occur (at least, not for a long while!), so you're pretty much stuck with what you have at that time. Symptoms of a poorly broken in engine are a variation in compression from cylinder-to-cylinder, because of the different levels of ring sealing.

 

Because manufacturing standards are so high today, especially with an engine like the 5.4L, the parts are in really good shape to begin with, and I think it would be really hard to badly screw up a break-in.

 

Still, most of my early miles were in the Georgia mountains, I did a lot of speeding up and slowing down, and at 1,000 miles I can't tell you for sure if my cruise control works.

 

The gas pedal works, that's for damn sure...

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