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Helpful hint for brake dusting!


03reptile

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Theres been a lot of complaints about the rear pads leaving black brake dust on the rear of the car. I had same issue with my 03 Terminator and switched over to a ceramic pad which all but eliminated the problem. I now have same issue with the GT500. Problem is most vendors don't carry a ceramic pad for the GT500 as of yet. Problem solved. Spoke with SVT today and the rear pads on our Shelby Gt500s are the same size as rear pads for the regular Mustang GT, 4.6, albiet different compound. Therefore, you can order a ceramic rear pad for a 2005-2007 Mustang GT and it will fit our GT500s rear caliper. There are lots of vendors who carry ceramic pads for the Mustang GT so take your choice! Hope this helps eliminate some of the nashing of teeth about the brake dust. I'm going to get some today and will install them ASAP. If there are any issues, I'll re-post, but I believe this will work well.

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If you do that, you will be going with an inferior pad. The GT500 pad offers better stopping power than the pad used on the GT Mustang.

 

But I agree the brake dust is ridiculous. My whole lower rear bumper is covered as well as the wheel and side skirts. At first I thought I was not washing the car properly but now I noticed that was obvioulsy not the issue!

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If you do that, you will be going with an inferior pad. The GT500 pad offers better stopping power than the pad used on the GT Mustang.

 

But I agree the brake dust is ridiculous. My whole lower rear bumper is covered as well as the wheel and side skirts. At first I thought I was not washing the car properly but now I noticed that was obvioulsy not the issue!

 

I ordered the Bendix ceramic pads throught Advanced Auto. They should be in first of next week. I never noticed a degradation in braking when I changed over to the ceramic rears in my 03 Terminator. I think the difference would be minimal during daily driving. They were about $90.00 with tax. It sure will be a blessing to have less dust to deal with. I also asked Jeff at SVT and he confirmed he had done the same with his 03 Cobra with no noticable ill effects. I'll let you all know how the install and results went next week.

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You didnt know we have the same rear brakes as a mustang GT? I think it was down right stupid for ford to not put brembo's all the way around. I was at a ford dealer last week and was looking at a fully loaded ford expedition msrp 45k It had dvd package and navi. sun roof runnding boards. 5.4 . How can they make a profit on this truck at 45k but they cant add some nicer rear barkes to the gt500. SRT8 are 45k fully loaded and come with brembo's on all 4. .......................WE GOT HOSED...............................

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You didnt know we have the same rear brakes as a mustang GT? I think it was down right stupid for ford to not put brembo's all the way around. I was at a ford dealer last week and was looking at a fully loaded ford expedition msrp 45k It had dvd package and navi. sun roof runnding boards. 5.4 . How can they make a profit on this truck at 45k but they cant add some nicer rear barkes to the gt500. SRT8 are 45k fully loaded and come with brembo's on all 4. .......................WE GOT HOSED...............................

that 411 kinda pisses me off. And i don't even have my car yet.

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  • 1 month later...
Try this thread - Porterfield pads get good reviews.

 

http://www.stangsunleashed.com/forums/inde...;hl=porterfield

I installed Porterfield pads and followed the instructions to a T. Seated per instructions. Drove 300 miles to Denver never using excessive braking also per instructions. Washed car had front and rear brake dust. Returned home, the difference in braking is unreal! When I washed the car I had about the same ammount of brake dust as with stock pads. Maybe it will settle down with a few more miles. I have dust but I'm way happy with the performance.

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i have said it before on another post about the same subject--- elbow grease is the way to go for me. california duster for the paint,then quik detail spray for paint and just a nice clean rag for the rims then a light spray of rim cleaner on another clean rag==== back to normal paint and rims. :hysterical2: better to live with what the car came with.

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I have had Porterfield pads since December and it was one of the best mods I have done.I can't say enough good about them.

 

I'm with 07 on this. Mine have been on since April. The dust isn't eliminated, but it is much less. At the dearborn event, I didn't see as much dust on my rims as I did on other cars there. This is from a group who would generally clean the cars off each morning, me included, then drive all around the Motor City. At the end of the day, much less dust for me. Except for Fred's car. His rims seemed to be as clean as mine were.

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I recently put the porterfields on all 4 corners. I am still in the break in period but the stoppong power is getting better. Initially it was a little less good but now is almost the same as the stock pads about 100 miles in...maybe 150. THe dust is less already but not gone by any means. I an hoping to get to the point where I only have to really worry about the dust on the rims and back when i wash the car - knowing some will be there - I just hated doing it after any drive at all. This dust seems to be easier to remove than the stock pads brake dust. I'm still learning how to best polish the new rims but so far I am happy with the porterfield pads.

 

I followed instructions on the fronts very close and had a shop do the rears because I didn't have the tool to get them open but made them follow the directions too and clean the rotors etc. I have zero noise increase from the brakes and now that the brakes are re-set I feel like it requires just a bit more pressure for stopping but I have not gotten to where I can try a panic stop yet. The directions which I am trying to follow as close as realistic call for a bunch of 30-5 slow downs with no pressure then a some normal ones and no panic stops through out the process. I'm maybe mid way though but have not gone out to a country road and done the process - I'm trying to do it through regular opportunities and when i am not in traffic I slide one in here and there.

 

Jury is still out on the final outcome but so far so good.

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...And don't forget we get the rediculous F-150 radio antenna too :-) ..... way to save $2 on a $45K car, Ford!

(Please don't Coldwater me for that one, moderators!)

 

The 03/04 Terminators had radios that were supposed to lower as you decelerated, which is a function of the radio.

 

But did you know if you don't install the wire that allows for that function you can save two dollars?

 

Guess who's radio didn't turn down as I slowed down. :hysterical:

 

Things I think should have been on the car for it's cost:

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  • 1 month later...

Dave was busy today.

 

A few notes:

1) The fronts are so easy it's embarrasing. The only thing you must do is push the pistons back gently a slight amount.

2) There are a couple tricks on the rear

2a) Don't let the caliper hang by it's hose when you remove it. I layed mine on top of the backing plate, or you can use a coat hanger.

2b) When you rotate the brake piston to retract it, you have to either use a special tool or fabricate something. Note there are two indents on the piston...those must end up in the same relative position as when you removed it...which means you must rotate the piston some increment of 180 degrees. The tit (shown by the screwdriver in one of the pics) on the brake pad fits into one of these small indents...don't get this wrong!

2c) Where the caliper mount bolts are, there is a little rubber accordion boot. Note that there is a metal thing on the end that goes between the rubber boot and the caliper itself. It is round most of the way around...but there is a flat (see photo). This flat MUST go against the caliper.

2d) Only do one wheel at a time. Reason? If you press a piston in abruptly, it's possible (although unlikely) that the other side's piston will pop out...and you'll have a real mess. In addition, it allows you to see how things go together.

3) After completing the job, but before driving, sit in the car and gently apply the emergency brake a few times until it firms up. Then, GENTLY pump the brake pedal to bring it back up by pushing the pistons out. You can do this either with the car running or not running, but I find it easier with the car running.

4) As far as breaking the new pads in, the only real no-no is immediately doing hard stops. You want to be just a bit gentle for the first 100 stops or so.

 

I have one complaint. On the front pads, I'm shocked at the size of the leading and trailing chamfers they used to eliminate brake squeal. It severely reduces the amount of contact between rotor and pad. My only hope is that the different material they use more than makes up for this so that stopping power is not decreased.

 

A few pics below...and I'll make a 2nd reply with more pics. Sorry about the sloppiness, but the pics are basically in reverse order. :wacko:

 

Dave

th_139-3977_IMG.jpg

th_139-3976_IMG.jpg

th_139-3975_IMG.jpg

th_139-3974_IMG.jpg

th_139-3971_IMG.jpg

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I did the Steeda/Hawk HPS pads a couple of weeks ago and the brake dust is just about eliminated! 100x better than the stock pads! :yahoo:

Excellent - I was waiting for someone to try out the Hawk HPS pads and report back on whether they take care of the dust problem. I seem to recall they are much cheaper than the Porterfields and Hawk makes good high performance brake pads. :happy feet:

 

Did you have to do any special preparation or lubrication on the pads or rotors? Any squeeking?

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From the Steeda Website - these prices are for the high performance street pads.

 

Fronts use 164-HB453F585: $109.95

 

I believe the rears use the GT pads 164-HB485F.656: $69.95

 

http://www.steeda.com/products/hi_performance_brake_pads.php

 

 

THANKS thats not a bad price.

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Dave was busy today.

 

A few notes:

1) The fronts are so easy it's embarrasing. The only thing you must do is push the pistons back gently a slight amount.

2) There are a couple tricks on the rear

2a) Don't let the caliper hang by it's hose when you remove it. I layed mine on top of the backing plate, or you can use a coat hanger.

2b) When you rotate the brake piston to retract it, you have to either use a special tool or fabricate something. Note there are two indents on the piston...those must end up in the same relative position as when you removed it...which means you must rotate the piston some increment of 180 degrees. The tit (shown by the screwdriver in one of the pics) on the brake pad fits into one of these small indents...don't get this wrong!

2c) Where the caliper mount bolts are, there is a little rubber accordion boot. Note that there is a metal thing on the end that goes between the rubber boot and the caliper itself. It is round most of the way around...but there is a flat (see photo). This flat MUST go against the caliper.

2d) Only do one wheel at a time. Reason? If you press a piston in abruptly, it's possible (although unlikely) that the other side's piston will pop out...and you'll have a real mess. In addition, it allows you to see how things go together.

3) After completing the job, but before driving, sit in the car and gently apply the emergency brake a few times until it firms up. Then, GENTLY pump the brake pedal to bring it back up by pushing the pistons out. You can do this either with the car running or not running, but I find it easier with the car running.

4) As far as breaking the new pads in, the only real no-no is immediately doing hard stops. You want to be just a bit gentle for the first 100 stops or so.

 

I have one complaint. On the front pads, I'm shocked at the size of the leading and trailing chamfers they used to eliminate brake squeal. It severely reduces the amount of contact between rotor and pad. My only hope is that the different material they use more than makes up for this so that stopping power is not decreased.

 

A few pics below...and I'll make a 2nd reply with more pics. Sorry about the sloppiness, but the pics are basically in reverse order. :wacko:

 

Dave

 

Dave,

Did you do any prep to the rotors or did you just swap out the pads?

Did you use any spray disk brake silencer on the back side of the pads?

Alan

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